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156 records – page 1 of 16.

The 24-hour rhythmicity of birth. A populational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65725
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
E. Glattre
T. Bjerkedal
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(1):31-6
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Delivery, Obstetric
Extraction, Obstetrical
Female
Humans
Labor, Induced
Norway
Pregnancy
Abstract
The incidence of birth has been determined for each hour of the day for all births in Norway in 1968-1977 of fetuses of 16 weeks of gestation or older, with resident mothers. The 24-hour incidence variations of births (A) with spontaneous onset and parturition, (B) with spontaneous onset, but delivery intervention, (C) with induced onset, but spontaneous birth, and (D) with induced onset and delivery intervention, are all different. It is shown that the curve for the hourly incidence of birth category A coincides very well with previous results of other workers. When multiple births are excluded and category A is split into first and later births in Northern and Southern Norway, dissimilarities arise between the respective 24-hour incidence curves. The results indicate that the 24-hour birth incidence variation has an underlying endogenous, circadian rhythmicity - possibly synchronized by the sun. The 24-hour rhythmicities of birth categories B, C and D seem to be purely exogenous - reflecting the working activity rhythms of hospital obstetricians and midwives.
PubMed ID
6858620 View in PubMed
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[ACCELERATION AND INDUCTION OF LABOR ACTIVITIES IN THE OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE IEVPATORIIA CITY HOSPITAL.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67050
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;105:64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
K I BRAHINSKYI
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;105:64
Date
1963
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Labor, Induced
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
14137873 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture and/or sweeping of the fetal membranes before induction of labor: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114508
Source
J Perinat Med. 2013 Sep 1;41(5):555-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2013
Author
Bodil Birgitte Andersen
Birthe Knudsen
Jens Lyndrup
Anni E Fælling
Dinni Illum
Marianne Johansen
Alice Borgen
Helle Jager
Charlotte Bjerre
Niels J Secher
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. bodilandersen@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Perinat Med. 2013 Sep 1;41(5):555-60
Date
Sep-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Adult
Denmark
Extraembryonic Membranes - physiology
Female
Humans
Labor, Induced - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Prolonged - therapy
Prospective Studies
Abstract
To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture, and sweeping of the fetal membranes, as methods for induction of labor.
Four hundred and seven pregnant women with normal singleton pregnancies and cephalic presentations were randomized at three delivery wards in Denmark at day 290 of gestation into groups of acupuncture, sweeping, acupuncture and sweeping and controls. The primary objective was to compare the proportion of women going into labor before induction of labor at 294 days in the four groups. The secondary objective was to compare the combined groups: with and without acupuncture, and with and without sweeping of the fetal membranes. The midwives, completing the forms for the trial at labor or induction, were blinded to group assessments.
Four hundred and seventeen women were randomized. Ten were excluded after randomization. One hundred and four women were randomized to acupuncture, 103 to sweeping of the membranes, 100 to both acupuncture and sweeping, and 100 were randomized to the control group. Comparison of the four groups demonstrated no significant difference in the number of women achieving spontaneous labor before planned induction. No difference was demonstrated by comparing the combined groups treated with acupuncture with the groups not treated with acupuncture (P=0.76). However, significantly more women went into labor before planned induction (P=0.02) in the combined groups receiving sweeping, compared with the groups not treated with sweeping.
Acupuncture at 41+ weeks of gestation did not reduce the need for induction. The study was of a sufficient size to demonstrate, in parallel, that sweeping of the fetal membranes significantly reduced the need of induction, sparing about 15% for formal induction of labor.
PubMed ID
23612695 View in PubMed
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Adverse Obstetric Outcomes Among Early-Onset Cancer Survivors in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269216
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Oct;126(4):803-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Johanna Melin
Sirpa Heinävaara
Nea Malila
Aila Tiitinen
Mika Gissler
Laura Madanat-Harjuoja
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Oct;126(4):803-10
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms
Pregnancy
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate risk of adverse obstetric outcomes and operative deliveries in female cancer survivors (diagnosed younger than 35 years of age) compared with female siblings of survivors.
Nationwide cancer and birth registries were merged to identify 1,800 first postdiagnosis deliveries of female cancer survivors and 7,137 first deliveries of female siblings between January 1987 and December 2013. Multiple unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk for adverse obstetric outcomes and operative deliveries adjusting for maternal age, year of delivery, gestational age, and smoking.
We found a significantly elevated risk for induction of labor, 19.1% in survivors and 15.6% in siblings (odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.35) and cesarean delivery, 23.6% in survivors and 18.6% in siblings (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.31) among cancer survivors compared with female siblings. The risks of instrumental vaginal delivery, malpresentation, placental pathologies, and postpartum hemorrhage were not, however, elevated among cancer survivors. The highest risks of adverse obstetric outcomes were seen among women treated in their childhood (aged 0-14 years).
Cancer survivors have a small but statistically increased risk for induction of labor and cesarean delivery compared with siblings without a history of cancer. Our findings indicate that pregnancies in cancer survivors are typically uncomplicated and cancer survivors should not be discouraged to have children after their cancer is cured.
II.
PubMed ID
26348187 View in PubMed
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Adverse obstetric outcomes among female childhood and adolescent cancer survivors in Sweden: A population-based matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309347
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2019 12; 98(12):1603-1611
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2019
Author
Gabriela Armuand
Agneta Skoog Svanberg
Marie Bladh
Gunilla Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2019 12; 98(12):1603-1611
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Cancer Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Clitoris - injuries
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Dystocia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Labor Presentation
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Lacerations - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer treatment during childhood may lead to late adverse effects, such as reduced musculoskeletal development or vascular, endocrine and pulmonary dysfunction, which in turn may have an adverse effect on later pregnancy and childbirth. The aim of the present study was to investigate pregnancy and obstetric outcomes as well as the offspring's health among childhood and adolescent female cancer survivors.
This register-based study included all women born between 1973 and 1977 diagnosed with cancer in childhood or adolescence (age
PubMed ID
31329281 View in PubMed
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Adverse obstetric outcomes in pregnancies resulting from oocyte donation: a retrospective cohort case study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274086
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:247
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Evangelia Elenis
Agneta Skoog Svanberg
Claudia Lampic
Alkistis Skalkidou
Helena Åkerud
Gunilla Sydsjö
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:247
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - epidemiology
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Oligohydramnios - epidemiology
Oocyte Donation - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Placenta, Retained - epidemiology
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Oocyte donation has been associated to gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders, placental abnormalities, preterm delivery and increased rate of caesarean delivery while simultaneously being characterized by high rates of primiparity, advanced maternal age and multiple gestation constituting the individual risk of mode of conception difficult to assess. This study aims to explore obstetrical outcomes among relatively young women with optimal health status conceiving singletons with donated versus autologous oocytes (via IVF and spontaneously).
National retrospective cohort case study involving 76 women conceiving with donated oocytes, 150 nulliparous women without infertility conceiving spontaneously and 63 women conceiving after non-donor IVF. Data on obstetric outcomes were retrieved from the National Birth Medical Register and the medical records of oocyte recipients from the treating University Hospitals of Sweden. Demographic and logistic regression analysis were performed to examine the association of mode of conception and obstetric outcomes.
Women conceiving with donated oocytes (OD) had a higher risk of hypertensive disorders [adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) 2.84, 95% CI (1.04-7.81)], oligohydramnios [aOR 12.74, 95% CI (1.24-130.49)], postpartum hemorrhage [aOR 7.11, 95% CI (2.02-24.97)] and retained placenta [aOR 6.71, 95% CI (1.58-28.40)] when compared to women who conceived spontaneously, after adjusting for relevant covariates. Similar trends, though not statistically significant, were noted when comparing OD pregnant women to women who had undergone non-donor IVF. Caesarean delivery [aOR 2.95, 95% CI (1.52-5.71); aOR 5.20, 95% CI (2.21-12.22)] and induction of labor [aOR 3.00, 95% CI (1.39-6.44); aOR 2.80, 95% CI (1.10-7.08)] occurred more frequently in the OD group, compared to the group conceiving spontaneously and through IVF respectively. No differences in gestational length were noted between the groups. With regard to the indication of OD treatment, higher intervention was observed in women with diminished ovarian reserve but the risk for hypertensive disorders did not differ after adjustment.
The selection process of recipients for medically indicated oocyte donation treatment in Sweden seems to be effective in excluding women with severe comorbidities. Nevertheless, oocyte recipients-despite being relatively young and of optimal health status- need careful counseling preconceptionally and closer monitoring prenatally for the development of hypertensive disorders.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26450684 View in PubMed
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Amniotic-fluid embolism and medical induction of labour: a retrospective, population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166936
Source
Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1444-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2006
Author
Michael S Kramer
Jocelyn Rouleau
Thomas F Baskett
K S Joseph
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, QC, Canada. michael.kramer@mcgill.ca
Source
Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1444-8
Date
Oct-21-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Embolism, Amniotic Fluid - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Induced
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Amniotic-fluid embolism is a rare, but serious and often fatal maternal complication of delivery, of which the cause is unknown. We undertook an epidemiological study to investigate the association between amniotic-fluid embolism and medical induction of labour.
We used a population-based cohort of 3 million hospital deliveries in Canada between 1991 and 2002 to assess the associations between overall and fatal rates of amniotic-fluid embolism and medical and surgical induction, maternal age, fetal presentation, mode of delivery, and pregnancy and labour complications.
Total rate of amniotic-fluid embolism was 14.8 per 100,000 multiple-birth deliveries and 6.0 per 100,000 singleton deliveries (odds ratio 2.5 [95% CI 0.9-6.2]). Of the 180 cases of amniotic-fluid embolism in women with singleton deliveries during the study period, 24 (13%) were fatal. We saw no significant temporal increase in occurrence of amniotic-fluid embolism for total or fatal cases. Medical induction of labour nearly doubled the risk of overall cases of amniotic-fluid embolism (adjusted odds ratio 1.8 [1.3-2.7]), and the association was stronger for fatal cases (crude odds ratio 3.5 [1.5-8.4]). Maternal age of 35 years or older, caesarean or instrumental vaginal delivery, polyhydramnios, cervical laceration or uterine rupture, placenta previa or abruption, eclampsia, and fetal distress were also associated with an increased risk.
Medical induction of labour seems to increase the risk of amniotic-fluid embolism. Although the absolute excess risk is low, women and physicians should be aware of this risk when making decisions about elective labour induction.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1399-40117055926
PubMed ID
17055946 View in PubMed
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-Anesthesia and analgesia practice patterns in French obstetrical patients-.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204492
Source
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim. 1998;17(3):210-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
M. Palot
J J Chalé
B. Colladon
G. Levy
B. Maria
E. Papiernik
P. Souteyrand
M. Naiditch
Author Affiliation
Département d'anesthésie-réanimation, CHU, Reims, France.
Source
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim. 1998;17(3):210-9
Date
1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data
Analgesia, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Conduction - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, General - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Maternity - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Private - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Labor, Obstetric
Night Care - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the rate of epidural analgesia (EA) for parturition and the techniques of anaesthesia for Caesarean section (CS).
Retrospective study.
A series of 84,235 deliveries.
The series was extracted from a total of 770,054 deliveries carried out in 1991, according to the number of births in each hospital (1/1 if the births were or = 2,000 per year). The data analyzed included: anaesthesia technique, whether or not there was an anaesthetist on night duty at the hospital, birth rate in the hospital, type of hospital: university (UH), general (GH) or private (PH). For vaginal deliveries, the mode of labour commencement (spontaneous or induced), the multiplicity of pregnancies and a history of past CS were also noted.
Vaginal deliveries: the overall rate of EA was 37.2%. EA were not carried out in 5% of maternity hospitals. In cases of spontaneous labour, the average rate was 32.1%, significantly less than for induced labour (59.6%, P
PubMed ID
9750732 View in PubMed
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The association between obstetrical interventions and late preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104857
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):538.e1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Kate L Bassil
Abdool S Yasseen
Mark Walker
Michael D Sgro
Prakesh S Shah
Graeme N Smith
Douglas M Campbell
Muhammad Mamdani
Ann E Sprague
Shoo K Lee
Jonathon L Maguire
Author Affiliation
Maternal-Infant Care Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):538.e1-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
There is concern that obstetric interventions (prelabor cesarean section and induced delivery) are drivers of late preterm (LP) birth. Our objective was to evaluate the independent association between obstetric interventions and LP birth and explore associated independent maternal and fetal risk factors for LP birth.
In this population-based cross-sectional study, the BORN Information System was used to identify all infants born between 34 and 40 completed weeks of gestation between 2005 and 2012 in Ontario, Canada. The association between obstetric interventions (preterm cesarean section and induced delivery) and LP birth (34 to 36 completed weeks' gestation vs 37 to 40 completed weeks' gestation) was assessed using generalized estimating equation regression.
Of 917,013 births between 34 and 40 weeks, 49,157 were LP (5.4%). In the adjusted analysis, "any obstetric intervention" (risk ratio [RR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.74), induction (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.61-0.82) and prelabor cesarean section (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.59-0.74) were all associated with a lower likelihood of LP vs term birth. Several independent potentially modifiable risk factors for LP birth were identified including previous cesarean section (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.16-1.40), smoking during pregnancy (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.21-1.36) and high material (RR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.03-1.18) and social (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16) deprivation indices.
After accounting for differences in maternal and fetal risk, LP births had a 35% lower likelihood of obstetric interventions than term births. Obstetric care providers may be preferentially avoiding induction and prelabor cesarean section between 34 and 37 weeks' gestation.
PubMed ID
24582931 View in PubMed
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156 records – page 1 of 16.