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9 records – page 1 of 1.

A 10-week randomized trial comparing eccentric vs. concentric hamstring strength training in well-trained soccer players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49656
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Roald Mjølsnes
Arni Arnason
Tor Østhagen
Truls Raastad
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Humans
Knee - physiology
Male
Muscles - physiology
Physical Education and Training - methods
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soccer
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the effects of a 10-week training program with two different exercises -- traditional hamstring curl (HC) and Nordic hamstrings (NH), a partner exercise focusing the eccentric phase -- on muscle strength among male soccer players. METHODS: Subjects were 21 well-trained players who were randomized to NH training (n = 11) or HC training (n = 10). The programs were similar, with a gradual increase in the number of repetitions from two sets of six reps to three sets of eight to 12 reps over 4 weeks, and then increasing load during the final 6 weeks of training. Strength was measured as maximal torque on a Cybex dynamometer before and after the training period. RESULTS: In the NH group, there was an 11% increase in eccentric hamstring torque measured at 60 degrees s(-1), as well as a 7% increase in isometric hamstring strength at 90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. Since there was no effect on concentric quadriceps strength, there was a significant increase in the hamstrings:quadriceps ratio from 0.89 +/- 0.12 to 0.98 +/- 0.17 (11%) in the NH group. No changes were observed in the HC group. CONCLUSION: NH training for 10 weeks more effectively develops maximal eccentric hamstring strength in well-trained soccer players than a comparable program based on traditional HC.
PubMed ID
15387805 View in PubMed
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The effect of geriatric rehabilitation on physical performance and pain in men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140094
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011 May-Jun;52(3):e129-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristiina Niemelä
Raija Leinonen
Pia Laukkanen
Author Affiliation
Kauniala Hospital and Rehabilitation Center for War Veterans, Kylpyläntie 19, FI-02700 Kauniainen, Finland. kristiina.niemela@suomi24.fi
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011 May-Jun;52(3):e129-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cognition
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Intervention Studies
Knee - physiology
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Strength - physiology
Pain - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Rehabilitation Centers
Treatment Outcome
Veterans
Abstract
In the developed countries, people are living longer and the number of aged persons is growing. Knowledge on the effectiveness of rehabilitative procedures is needed and information in physical performance between men and women is scarce. An intervention study was carried out in two war veterans' rehabilitation centers in Finland to examine the effects of geriatric inpatient rehabilitation on physical performance and pain in elderly men and women. The study included 441 community-dwelling persons with a mean age of 83 years. A clinical assessment and a structured interview were carried out. Cognitive capacity was evaluated with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). Physical performance was measured through several validated tests. Pain was measured with the visual analogy scale (VAS). The rehabilitation was carried out with the standard rehabilitation protocol. Both men and women showed a statistically significant improvement in physical performance tests. The experience of pain and disease symptoms diminished significantly in both sexes (p
PubMed ID
20943278 View in PubMed
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Growth, development and fitness of the Canadian Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2136
Source
Medicine and Science in Sports. 5(3):161-169.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Rode, A.
Shephard, R.J.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Medicine and Science in Sports. 5(3):161-169.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Igloolik
Height
Weight
Muscle strength
Aerobic power
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Child Development
Female
Growth
Humans
Inuits
Knee - physiology
Male
Muscles - physiology
Oxygen consumption
Physical Exertion
Physical Fitness
Puberty
Pulse
Respiration
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Skinfold thickness
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1274.
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Measures of knee function: International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Physical Function Short Form (KOOS-PS), Knee Outcome Survey Activities of Daily Living Scale (KOS-ADL), Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Activity Rating Scale (ARS), and Tegner Activity Score (TAS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124133
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Nov;63 Suppl 11:S208-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011

Muscle strength as a predictor of onset of ADL dependence in people aged 75 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52208
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2002 Jun;14(3 Suppl):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Taina Rantanen
Kirsten Avlund
Harri Suominen
Marianne Schroll
Kerstin Frändin
Era Pertti
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, and Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä. Taina@maila.jyu.fi
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2002 Jun;14(3 Suppl):10-5
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Elbow - physiology
Female
Forecasting
Hand Strength
Humans
Isometric Contraction
Knee - physiology
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this prospective study over 5 years was to examine maximal isometric strength of multiple muscle groups as a predictor of losing independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The participants were from the Nordic Research on Aging (NORA75). These analyses are restricted to 567 people who at baseline were independent in ADL and participated in strength tests, and who five years later participated in follow-up ADL assessments. Tests on maximal isometric strength of hand grip, elbow flexion, knee extension and trunk flexion and extension were done using adjustable dynamometers. For each muscle group tested, three equal groups were formed for men and women separately based on distributions of results. Those who reported being unable or needing help for eating, dressing, bathing, toileting, walking indoors or transferring from a bed or a chair were rated as ADL dependent. Of the 227 initially ADL independent men, 21 (9.3%) became dependent in ADL. In women, the figures were 30 (8.8%) of 340. Multiple logistic regression models were used to predict the risk of ADL dependence in groups based on strength tertiles. After confirming that the association of muscle strength and incident ADL-dependence was similar in men and women, both genders were included in the same analyses adjusted for body weight and height, gender and research locality. Gender specific cut-offs were used for strength tertiles. All the strength tests predicted ADL dependence, with those being in the lowest tertile having two to three times greater risks than those in the highest tertile of strength. Further adjustments for chronic diseases did not materially change the results. Strength tests could be used to identify people who are still independent in ADL but who are at increased risk of becoming dependent because of poor muscle strength, and who could reduce their risk by strengthening exercises.
PubMed ID
12475129 View in PubMed
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Muscle strength correlates with total body bone mineral density in young women but not in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52051
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Feb;14(1):24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
E. Ribom
O. Ljunggren
K. Piehl-Aulin
S. Ljunghall
L E Bratteby
G. Samuelson
H. Mallmin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. eva.ribon@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Feb;14(1):24-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Comparative Study
Female
Hand - physiology
Humans
Knee - physiology
Life Style
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a growing health problem. One of the proposed reasons for this is a more sedentary lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between muscle strength and total body bone mineral density (TBMD) in young adults at expected peak bone mass. METHODS: Sixty-four women and 61 men (total 125) 21 years of age were included. Handgrip strength, isokinetic knee-flexion and -extension muscle strength, TBMD, and body composition were measured. RESULTS: Univariate regression analyses showed that knee flexion and extension explained almost 30% of the variation in TBMD in women, whereas handgrip strength was not associated with TBMD. In men, no correlation between any measures of muscle strength and TBMD was evident. Stepwise regression analysis showed that knee-flexion and -extension muscle strength in women were associated with TBMD, R2=0.27. In men, lean body mass, fat mass, weight, and height were predictors for TBMD, R2=0.43, whereas muscle strength did not affect the prediction of TBMD. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle strength at weight-bearing sites is related to TBMD in women, whereas body composition is related to TBMD in men. The association of lower limb strength on TBMD only in young women indicates a gender difference.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Feb;14(1):114971423
PubMed ID
14723784 View in PubMed
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Muscle strength differences in urban and rural populations in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73263
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1993 Dec;74(12):1315-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
K. Ringsberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1993 Dec;74(12):1315-8
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Isometric Contraction
Knee - physiology
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Rural Health
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urban health
Abstract
The isometric extension and flexion strength of the right knee was investigated in 396 men and 537 women. The probands were randomly selected from the National Population Records, either from the city of Malmö, Sweden, or from a typical agricultural region 60km outside the city. Both the extension and the flexion strength decreased with age in both groups. Between 50 years and 80 years of age the decrease was almost 40%. The urban probands had significantly lower muscle strength in both sexes. The difference was most pronounced for the knee extension strength. Also, the flexion strength was less in the urban population, the difference significant only in octogenarians.
PubMed ID
8259899 View in PubMed
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Shared genetic and environmental effects on strength and power in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176744
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Jan;37(1):72-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Kristina Tiainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Markku Alén
Eino Heikkinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Markku Koskenvuo
Asko Tolvanen
Satu Pajala
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35(Viveca), Fin-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland. tiainen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Jan;37(1):72-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Knee - physiology
Lower Extremity - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscles - physiology
Twins - physiology
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
This study examined the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on maximal leg extensor power and also investigated whether leg extensor power and maximum voluntary isometric knee extensor strength share a genetic component.
Muscle functions were measured as part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging in 101 monozygotic (MZ) and 116 dizygotic (DZ) female twin pairs aged 63-76 yr. Leg extensor power was measured using the Nottingham Leg Extensor Power Rig and maximum voluntary isometric knee extensor strength using an adjustable dynamometer chair. The analyses were carried out using the maximum likelihood method in Mx-program on the raw data set.
A bivariate Cholesky decomposition model showed that leg extensor power and isometric knee extensor strength shared a genetic component in common, which accounted for 32% of the total variance in leg extensor power and 48% in isometric knee extensor strength. In addition, power and strength had a nonshared environmental effect in common accounting for four percent of the variance in power and 52% in strength. Remaining variance for leg extensor power was due to trait-specific shared and nonshared environmental effects.
Observed genetic effect in common for leg extensor power and maximum voluntary isometric knee extensor strength indicated that these two traits are regulated by the same genes. However, also environmental effects have a significant role in explaining the variability in power and strength.
PubMed ID
15632671 View in PubMed
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The tuberositas tibiae and extension in the knee joint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250719
Source
Acta Morphol Neerl Scand. 1976 Sep;14(3):215-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1976
Author
A E Ljunggren
Source
Acta Morphol Neerl Scand. 1976 Sep;14(3):215-39
Date
Sep-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computers
Female
Humans
Knee - physiology
Male
Norway
Sex Factors
Tibia - anatomy & histology
Abstract
In all 56 tibiae from Lapps and 56 from Norwegians have been studied. These ethnic groups represent different weight bearing situations. Variables dealing with the extension in the knee joint are dealth with. The bone is mainly studied in the AP and the ML planes. The material is analyzed statistically. The distribution form is examined and the deviations from normality are found to be moderate. Chiefly positive skewness occurs. Platykurtosis is found equally often as leptokurtosis. The deviations from a standard normal distribution are not supposed to affect the results significantly. There is a non-systematic pattern of distribution. The variability is generally lower in Lapps than in Norwegians. The variability is about the same in linear and angular variables and in indices. In linear variables females and Lapps show lower mean values than males and Norwegians, respectively. Lapps show the largest indices. In linear variables, contrary to in angular variables and indices, the sex differences exceed the differences between the ethnic groups. As a rule sex differences are largest in Lapps. The variations of the tuberositas tibiae are supposed to be in particular the results of muscular forces in bone remodeling. The relationship between the habitual knee position and extension is discussed.
PubMed ID
1007969 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.