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Ambler class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Canadian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180913
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004 Apr;48(4):1204-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Michael R Mulvey
Elizabeth Bryce
David Boyd
Marianna Ofner-Agostini
Sara Christianson
Andrew E Simor
Shirley Paton
Author Affiliation
Nosocomial Infections, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba. michael_mulvey@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004 Apr;48(4):1204-14
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada - epidemiology
Chromosome Mapping
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Escherichia coli - drug effects - enzymology
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Klebsiella - drug effects - enzymology
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Sequence Data
Phenotype
Plasmids - genetics
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Transformation, Bacterial - genetics
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
This report describes a study carried out to gain baseline information on the molecular characteristics of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Canada. A total of 29,323 E. coli and 5,156 Klebsiella sp. isolates were screened at 12 participating sites. Of these, 505 clinically significant, nonrepeat isolates displaying reduced susceptibility to the NCCLS-recommended beta-lactams were submitted to a central laboratory over a 1-year period ending on 30 September 2000. A total of 116 isolates were confirmed to be ESBL producers. PCR and sequence analysis revealed the presence of TEM-11 (n = 1), TEM-12 (n = 1), TEM-29 (n = 1), TEM-52 (n = 4), CTX-M-13 (n = 1), CTX-M-14 (n = 15), CTX-M-15 (n = 11), SHV-2 (n = 2), SHV-2a (n = 12), SHV-5 (n = 6), SHV-12 (n = 45), and SHV-30 (n = 2). Five novel beta-lactamases were identified and designated TEM-115 (n = 2), TEM-120 (n = 1), SHV-40 (n = 2), SHV-41 (n = 4), and SHV-42 (n = 1). In addition, no molecular mechanism was identified for five isolates displaying an ESBL phenotype. Macrorestriction analysis of all ESBL isolates was conducted, as was restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of plasmids harboring ESBLs. Although a "clonal" distribution of isolates was observed at some individual sites, there was very little evidence suggesting intrahospital spread. In addition, examples of identical or closely related plasmids that were identified at geographically distinct sites across Canada are given. However, there was considerable diversity with respect to plasmid types observed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15047521 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Klebsiella oxytoca septicemias associated with the use of invasive blood pressure monitoring equipment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224047
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Apr;36(3):289-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
U. Ransjö
Z. Good
K. Jalakas
I. Kühn
I. Siggelkow
B. Aberg
E. Anjou
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Apr;36(3):289-91
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Monitors
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Piperacillin - pharmacology
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seven cases of septicemia with piperacillin-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca (PRKO) occurred at 2-monthly intervals in a thoracic surgery intensive care unit. All PRKO isolates were serotyped, and phenotyped with a biochemical typing system. Only one patient in the unit was found to be colonized in stool or respiratory tract with PRKO, and this strain was different from the septicemia strains in phenotype though not in serotype. Environmental cultures, from humidifiers, oxygenators, pressure transducers, etc. were negative. PRKO of the epidemic phenotype was recovered from several non-patient transducer domes. The outbreak ended when transducer heads were disinfected and the use of non-patient domes was abolished.
PubMed ID
1574979 View in PubMed
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A case-control study of risk factors for urinary acquisition of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing CTX-M-15 in an outbreak situation in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145253
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Jul;42(6-7):439-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Birgitta Lytsy
Johan Lindbäck
Erik Torell
Staffan Sylvan
Inga Velicko
Asa Melhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. birgitta.lytsy@akademiska.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Jul;42(6-7):439-44
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Female
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - urine
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - isolation & purification
Logistic Models
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urine - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
A retrospective case-control study was initiated at Uppsala University Hospital in 2006 during a major outbreak caused by a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain producing CTX-M-15. To identify risk factors associated with acquisition of the outbreak strain in the urinary tract, 52 case patients with a urine culture positive for the outbreak strain between 1 May and 31 December 2005 were enrolled. Case patients were matched 1:2 with concurrently hospitalized control patients with significant growth of susceptible Escherichia coli in a urine sample. Conditional logistic regression analyses identified hospital stay >or=9 days (odds ratio (OR) 18.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.74-61.2), nasogastric feeding tube (OR 18.0, 95% CI 2.28-142) and diarrhoea (OR 9.62, 95% CI 3.30-28.1) as risk factors with high ORs. The odds of previous use of cephalosporins were 7.58 (95% CI 3.13-18.4) times higher in case patients compared with the controls. Several multivariable models were evaluated to reduce bias from confounding. These models identified prolonged period of hospitalization, diarrhoea, malignancy and antibiotic use as the most important risk factors for acquisition of the outbreak strain, factors that are often found in elderly patients with a poor functional status.
PubMed ID
20180680 View in PubMed
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Central line-associated bloodstream infection in neonatal intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106771
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;34(11):1167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Ana C Blanchard
Elise Fortin
Isabelle Rocher
Dorothy L Moore
Charles Frenette
Claude Tremblay
Caroline Quach
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;34(11):1167-73
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Birth weight
Candidemia - epidemiology
Candidiasis - epidemiology
Catheter-Related Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Catheterization, Central Venous - adverse effects
Central Venous Catheters - adverse effects - microbiology
Comorbidity
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Describe the epidemiology of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) participating in a standardized and mandatory CLABSI surveillance program.
Retrospective cohort. Setting. We included patients admitted (April 2007-March 2011) to 7 level II/III NICUs who developed a CLABSI (as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network).
CLABSIs/1,000 central line-days and device utilization ratio were calculated; ?(2) test, Student t test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Poisson regression were used.
Overall, 191 patients had 202 CLABSI episodes for a pooled mean rate of 4.0 CLABSIs/1,000 central line-days and a device utilization ratio of 0.20. Annual pooled mean CLABSI rates increased from 3.6 in 2007-2008 to 5.1 CLABSIs/1,000 central line-days in 2010-2011 (P - .01). The all-cause 30-day case fatality proportion was 8.9% (n = 17) and occurred a median of 8 days after CLABSI. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was identified in 112 (50.5%) cases. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in 22 cases, and 3 (13.6%) were resistant to methicillin. An underlying intra-abdominal pathology was found in 20% (40/202) of CLABSI cases, 50% of which were reported in the last year of study. When adjusted for mean birth weight, annual CLABSI incidence rates were independently associated with the proportion of intra-abdominal pathology (P = .007) and the proportion of pulmonary pathology (P = .016) reported.
The increase in CLABSI rates in Quebec NICUs seems to be associated with an increased proportion of cases with underlying intra-abdominal and pulmonary pathologies, which needs further investigation.
PubMed ID
24113600 View in PubMed
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Changes in the incidence and spectrum of neonatal septicemia during a fifteen-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60261
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Sep;74(5):687-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
R. Bennet
M. Eriksson
B. Melen
R. Zetterström
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Sep;74(5):687-90
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Citrobacter - isolation & purification
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology
Septicemia - epidemiology - microbiology
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
Over a period of 15 years the incidence of neonatal septicemia seen at St Göran's Children's Hospital has increased both per 1000 births and per 100 admitted neonates. The spectrum of causative organisms has changed towards more Gram-positive organisms and fewer Gram-negative organisms. In the initial antibiotic treatment an aminoglycoside and ampicillin derivate will still be needed to give full coverage.
PubMed ID
3901662 View in PubMed
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Concurrent emergence of multidrug resistance and heat resistance by CTX-M-15-encoding conjugative plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121738
Source
APMIS. 2012 Sep;120(9):699-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Martin S Bojer
Anette M Hammerum
Steffen L Jørgensen
Frank Hansen
Stefan S Olsen
Karen A Krogfelt
Carsten Struve
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 2012 Sep;120(9):699-705
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - metabolism - microbiology
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - genetics - metabolism
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Plasmids - genetics
Retrospective Studies
beta-Lactamases - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
A plasmid-encoded ClpK protein was recently identified as a predictor of a heat-resistant phenotype in the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study was undertaken to evaluate the presence of the clpK gene in extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae and to assess the probable co-transfer of multi-resistance with the heat resistance phenotype. A Danish collection of 80 ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae bloodstream infection isolates was screened for clpK by colony hybridization. Nineteen isolates (24%) were positive for clpK; some of them representing major clones identified in Denmark. Among these, nine isolates belonged to a single K. pneumoniae CTX-M-15 clone with sequence type (ST)16 exhibiting a heat-resistant phenotype. This clone has a multi-hospital occurrence and has also been detected outside Denmark. Horizontal co-transfer of multiple antibiotic resistances, including the CTX-M-15 resistance determinant, and the heat resistance phenotype was observed. Thus, the clpK gene is harbored by different ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates including a clone of ST16 internationally spread. The co-localization of clpK on transferable ESBL-encoding plasmids allowing co-dissemination of multiple drug resistance with bacterial heat resistance is a highly interesting phenomenon that may further complicate the prevention of spreading of certain successful clones of multi-resistant K. pneumoniae.
PubMed ID
22882258 View in PubMed
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[DISTRIBUTION OF BACTERIA OF THE KLEBSIELLA STRAIN IN WATER OBJECTS AND THEIR VALUE IN DEVELOPING OF THE WATER CAUSED ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275141
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(4):397-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Yu A Rakhmanin
L V Ivanova
T Z Artyomova
E K Gipp
A V Zagaynova
T N Maksimkina
A V Krasnyak
P V Zhuravlev
V V Aleshnya
O P Panasovets
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(4):397-406
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - microbiology - standards
Dysentery - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Klebsiella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Purification - methods - standards
Water Supply - methods - standards
Waterborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The wide circulation of Klebsiella bacteria in water ofwater objects of different climatic zones of Russia and various function is established. So bacteria of the Klebsiella strain are in superficial sources of the centralized water supply depending on extent of their biological and chemical pollution; underground waters at the unprotected water-bearing horizons; in drinking water at insufficiently effective system of its cleaning and disinfecting. Klebsiella circulating in water was shown to keep properties of pathogenicity and a virulence, possess resistance both to modern preparations and disinfecting agents (chlorine, an ultraviolet to radiation). Bacteria of the Klebsiella strain have high penetration in the water-bearing horizons. At strains of Klebsiella there is allocated considerable pathogenic potential (adhesive, invasive, phosphatase, lecithinase, DNA-ase, hemolytic activity) and genetic markers of pathogenicity of cnf-1. The etiologic role of bacteria of Klebsiella and an infecting (100, COE/dm3) dose emergence of acute intestinal infections (AII) is established. Detection of Klebsiella in water objects and especially in water of drinking appointment, in the absence of total coliform bacteria (TCB) contributes to the epidemic danger of water use.
PubMed ID
27430075 View in PubMed
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Emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae during the years 2000 and 2004 in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141840
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010 Aug;16(8):1158-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
S D Forssten
E. Kolho
A. Lauhio
L. Lehtola
S. Mero
A. Oksaharju
J. Jalava
E. Tarkka
M. Vaara
J. Vuopio-Varkila
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland. sofia.forssten@th1.fi
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010 Aug;16(8):1158-61
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - biosynthesis
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cluster analysis
Community-Acquired Infections - microbiology
Cross Infection - microbiology
DNA Fingerprinting
Escherichia coli - classification - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Klebsiella pneumoniae - classification - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Epidemiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
The molecular epidemiology of 33 Escherichia coli and 81 Klebsiella pneumoniae extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing healthcare-associated and community-acquired isolates collected in the Helsinki district during 2000-2004 was investigated. Clonality studies, antimicrobial susceptibility and genotyping of the isolates were performed. Newly emerging CTX-M-producing E. coli and bla(SHV-12)-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were detected. Clonal clusters of both species persisted throughout the study period.
PubMed ID
20670290 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.