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The 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus is not linked to calcium stone formation or calciuric phenotypes in French-Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206213
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
P. Scott
D. Ouimet
Y. Proulx
M L Trouvé
G. Guay
B. Gagnon
L. Valiquette
A. Bonnardeaux
Author Affiliation
Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Calcium - urine
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Kidney Calculi - enzymology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Pedigree
Phenotype
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Calcium urolithiasis is often associated with increased intestinal absorption and urine excretion of calcium, and has been suggested to result from increased vitamin D production. The role of the enzyme 1 alpha-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting step in active vitamin D production, was evaluated in 36 families, including 28 sibships with at least a pair of affected sibs, using qualitative and quantitative trait linkage analyses. Sibs with a verified calcium urolithiasis passage (n = 117) had higher 24-h calciuria (P = 0.03), oxaluria (P = 0.02), fasting and postcalcium loading urine calcium/creatinine (Ca/cr) ratios (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002, respectively), and serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels (P = 0.02) compared with nonstone-forming sibs (n = 120). Markers from a 9-centiMorgan interval encompassing the VDD1 locus on chromosome 12q13-14 (putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase) were analyzed in 28 sibships (146 sib pairs) of single and recurrent stone formers and in 14 sibships (65 sib pairs) with recurrent-only (> or = 3 episodes) stone-forming sibs. Two-point and multipoint analyses did not reveal excess in alleles shared among affected sibs at the VDD1 locus. Linkage of stone formation to the VDD1 locus could be excluded, respectively, with a lambda d of 2.0 (single and recurrent stone formers) and 3.25 (recurrent stone formers). Quantitative trait analyses revealed no evidence for linkage to 24-h calciuria and oxaluria, serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels, and Ca/cr ratios. This study shows absence of linkage of the putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus to calcium stone formation or to quantitative traits associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria. In addition, there is coaggregation of calciuric and oxaluric phenotypes with stone formation.
PubMed ID
9513904 View in PubMed
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Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Aug 24;88(34):34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1988

[10 years' experience of the operation of a nephrological day hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215286
Source
Urol Nefrol (Mosk). 1995 May-Jun;(3):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
S O Androsova
N G Miroshnichenko
O N Lavrova
T A Panina
Source
Urol Nefrol (Mosk). 1995 May-Jun;(3):41-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Day Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Hospital Bed Capacity, under 100
Hospitals, Special - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Kidney Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Moscow
Nephrology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
For a decade 324 patients with nephropathy have been admitted to a day hospital for obtaining more accurate data on nephropathy activity, on the role of hemodynamic and metabolic factor in the disease progression. The treatment group patients received repeated courses of high-dose cytostatics and corticosteroids. Pregnant women at risk of nephropathy were given small doses of aspirin and curantil.
PubMed ID
7618224 View in PubMed
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[20 years' experience with kidney transplantation in Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235401
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
C G Groth
L. Ost
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Date
Apr-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cyclosporins - therapeutic use
Forecasting
Graft Rejection - drug effects
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - surgery
Kidney Transplantation
Postoperative Complications - surgery
Reoperation
Sweden
Abstract
Renal transplantations have now been carried out at our hospital for just over 20 years. The results have gradually improved and are now very satisfactory. There are many explanations for this development, but the improvement in immunosuppression has probably been the most crucial development. Renal transplantation is cheaper and it provides greater wellbeing for the patient than does chronic dialysis treatment. The indications have been widened and the number of patients waiting for a new kidney is increasing. An improved retrieval of cadaveric kidneys will be necessary for the required expansion of kidney transplantation programmes.
PubMed ID
3307211 View in PubMed
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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxycholecaliferol and fractures of the proximal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252013
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1975
Author
B. Lund
O H Sorensen
A B Christensen
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Date
Aug-16-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Femoral Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Kidney - metabolism
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - complications - etiology
Phosphorus - blood
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-H.C.C.) has been measured in 67 consective cases of fracture of the proximal femur. The values found in these patients were not different from values found in these patients were not different from those in control groups at the same time of the year. Plasma 25-H.C.C. was not correlated to plasma calcium or phosphorus, the Ca times P product, or the alkaline phosphatase. X-rays showed Looser zones in only 1 patient, in whom the lowest plasma 25-H.C.C. was found. Osteomalacia is not uncommon among elderly people in Denmark, but it is more likely to depend on a decline in the renal efficiency to convert 25-H.C.C. to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol than a low dietary intake of vitamin D.
PubMed ID
50509 View in PubMed
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210Pb and 210Po in tissues of some Alaskan residents as related to consumption of caribou or reindeer meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5061
Source
Health Physics. 1970 Feb;18(2):127-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1970

The 1994 annual report of the North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211369
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Aug;10(4):422-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
E C Kohaut
A. Tejani
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA.
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Aug;10(4):422-34
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Annual Reports as Topic
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - mortality - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - utilization
Male
Renal Dialysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study (NAPRTCS) is a research effort that was organized and initiated in 1987. The following manuscript is the 1994 NAPRTCS annual report which has summarized data that has been voluntarily contributed by 83 centers. The report includes data on 3,183 patients who have undergone a total of 3,445 renal transplants between 1 January 1987 and 18 February 1994 when the data set was closed. The report also contains data on 1,611 independent courses of dialysis which were initiated between 1 January 1992 and 18 February 1994. This report is meant to update the previous NAPRTCS annual reports as well as demonstrate how the NAPRTCS database has changed clinical practice since its inception. There have been 855 graft failures among the 3,438 transplants. Due to the maturing of the database, chronic rejection now accounts for 34% of graft failures which have occurred over the last year. Graft failure was increased in recipients if the recipients were 6 years did not have catch-up growth post transplant. Overall graft survival has improved markedly since the inception of this study. The dialysis database is just maturing and the data confirm that growth on dialysis continues to be very poor. The 1994 annual report of NAPRTCS extends previous findings of this valuable database. It is gratifying to know that early findings of NAPRTCS have led to changes in therapy which have led to improvement in the care of these very special children.
PubMed ID
8865236 View in PubMed
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The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
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The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134302
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
Anson Cheung
Jeannine Costigan
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
John Floras
Nadia Giannetti
Adam Grzeslo
Karen Harkness
George A Heckman
Jonathan G Howlett
Simon Kouz
Kori Leblanc
Elizabeth Mann
Eileen O'Meara
Miroslav Rajda
Vivek Rao
Jessica Simon
Elizabeth Swiggum
Shelley Zieroth
J Malcolm O Arnold
Tom Ashton
Michel D'Astous
Paul Dorian
Haissam Haddad
Debra L Isaac
Marie-Hélène Leblanc
Peter Liu
Bruce Sussex
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. robert.mckelvie@phri.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Palliative Care - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Societies, Medical
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):871.e721885242
PubMed ID
21601772 View in PubMed
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3329 records – page 1 of 333.