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[20 years' experience with kidney transplantation in Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235401
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
C G Groth
L. Ost
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Date
Apr-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cyclosporins - therapeutic use
Forecasting
Graft Rejection - drug effects
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - surgery
Kidney Transplantation
Postoperative Complications - surgery
Reoperation
Sweden
Abstract
Renal transplantations have now been carried out at our hospital for just over 20 years. The results have gradually improved and are now very satisfactory. There are many explanations for this development, but the improvement in immunosuppression has probably been the most crucial development. Renal transplantation is cheaper and it provides greater wellbeing for the patient than does chronic dialysis treatment. The indications have been widened and the number of patients waiting for a new kidney is increasing. An improved retrieval of cadaveric kidneys will be necessary for the required expansion of kidney transplantation programmes.
PubMed ID
3307211 View in PubMed
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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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The 1994 annual report of the North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211369
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Aug;10(4):422-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
E C Kohaut
A. Tejani
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA.
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Aug;10(4):422-34
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Annual Reports as Topic
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - mortality - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - utilization
Male
Renal Dialysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study (NAPRTCS) is a research effort that was organized and initiated in 1987. The following manuscript is the 1994 NAPRTCS annual report which has summarized data that has been voluntarily contributed by 83 centers. The report includes data on 3,183 patients who have undergone a total of 3,445 renal transplants between 1 January 1987 and 18 February 1994 when the data set was closed. The report also contains data on 1,611 independent courses of dialysis which were initiated between 1 January 1992 and 18 February 1994. This report is meant to update the previous NAPRTCS annual reports as well as demonstrate how the NAPRTCS database has changed clinical practice since its inception. There have been 855 graft failures among the 3,438 transplants. Due to the maturing of the database, chronic rejection now accounts for 34% of graft failures which have occurred over the last year. Graft failure was increased in recipients if the recipients were 6 years did not have catch-up growth post transplant. Overall graft survival has improved markedly since the inception of this study. The dialysis database is just maturing and the data confirm that growth on dialysis continues to be very poor. The 1994 annual report of NAPRTCS extends previous findings of this valuable database. It is gratifying to know that early findings of NAPRTCS have led to changes in therapy which have led to improvement in the care of these very special children.
PubMed ID
8865236 View in PubMed
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Abnormal diurnal rhythm of urine output following renal transplantation: the impact of blood pressure and diuretics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139130
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
K. Alstrup
C. Graugaard-Jensen
S. Rittig
K A Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. karenalstrup@dadlnet.dk
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drinking
Female
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Polyuria - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urination - drug effects
Urodynamics - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Nocturnal polyuria is the excretion at night of an excessive volume of urine. A major problem following renal transplantation is an abnormal diurnal rhythmicity in urine output. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria among renal transplant recipients in the early period after transplantation as well as at least 1 year after transplantation. We aimed to explore possible pathophysiological mechanisms behind nocturnal polyuria in this group of patients, focusing on the impact of blood pressure and medication.
Seventeen recently transplanted patients 17 late transplant recipients, and 17 healthy controls were included in the study. Voiding habits were assessed by completion of a frequency-volume chart recording all fluid intakes and voiding. A concomitant 24-hour blood pressure profile was obtained in all.
Renal transplant recipients had a high prevalence of nocturnal polyuria (74%) and a disturbed blood pressure profile with a lack of appropriate nocturnal dipping (P
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2012 Mar;187(3):96422325519
PubMed ID
21094810 View in PubMed
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ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139624
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2010 Oct;57(10):A4197
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Karoline Schousboe
Kjell Titlestad
Francois Baudier
Lars Ulrich Hansen
Claus Bistrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. kschousboe@dadlnet.dk
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2010 Oct;57(10):A4197
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived - therapeutic use
Antigens, CD20 - immunology
Blood Group Incompatibility - blood - immunology
Creatinine - blood
Denmark
Female
Graft Rejection
Humans
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - mortality - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Mycophenolic Acid - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Tacrolimus - therapeutic use
Abstract
Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney transplantation without increasing rejection or mortality rates.
Retrospective evaluation. Eleven patients received ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The patients were followed for 3-26 months.
One patient had an antibody-mediated rejection, one patient suffered T-cell-mediated rejection, and one patient died of myocardial infarction with a functioning graft on the third post-operative day. Both rejections were treated effectively. Among the patients, the average serum creatinine level was 128 micromol/l.
The rejection and mortality rates for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH are similar to the results from ABO-compatible kidney transplantations performed at the OUH and at other hospitals.
PubMed ID
21040684 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal patients on the road to kidney transplantation: is residence location a barrier?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167757
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(5):826-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
K E Yeates
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. yeatesk@post.queensu.ca
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(5):826-8
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Indians, North American
Kidney Failure, Chronic - ethnology - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Rural Population
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
Transportation
Abstract
Aboriginal dialysis patients have reduced access to kidney transplantation. The reasons for this disparity are unknown. Tonelli et al. show that in Canada, residence location does not significantly impact on an Aboriginal dialysis patient's likelihood of receiving kidney transplantation. This Commentary explores the issue of decreased access and examines issues surrounding the findings of Tonelli et al.
Notes
Comment On: Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(5):924-3016788690
PubMed ID
16929330 View in PubMed
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Accepting kidneys from older living donors: impact on transplant recipient outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136196
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Apr;11(4):743-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
A. Young
S J Kim
M R Speechley
A. Huang
G A Knoll
G V Ramesh Prasad
D. Treleaven
M. Diamant
A X Garg
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Western Ontario, Canada. ann.young@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Apr;11(4):743-50
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cadaver
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Graft Rejection
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology - surgery
Kidney Function Tests
Kidney Transplantation - mortality
Living Donors
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Young Adult
Abstract
Older living kidney donors are regularly accepted. Better knowledge of recipient outcomes is needed to inform this practice. This retrospective cohort study observed kidney allograft recipients from Ontario, Canada between January 2000 and March 2008. Donors to these recipients were older living (= 60 years), younger living, or standard criteria deceased (SCD). Review of medical records and electronic healthcare data were used to perform survival analysis. Recipients received 73 older living, 1187 younger living and 1400 SCD kidneys. Recipients of older living kidneys were older than recipients of younger living kidneys. Baseline glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of older kidneys was 13 mL/min per 1.73 m² lower than younger kidneys. Median follow-up time was 4 years. The primary outcome of total graft loss was not significantly different between older and younger living kidney recipients [adjusted hazard ratio, HR (95%CI): 1.56 (0.98-2.49)]. This hazard ratio was not proportional and increased with time. Associations were not modified by recipient age or donor eGFR. There was no significant difference in total graft loss comparing older living to SCD kidney recipients [HR: 1.29 (0.80-2.08)]. In light of an observed trend towards potential differences beyond 4 years, uncertainty remains, and extended follow-up of this and other cohorts is warranted.
PubMed ID
21401866 View in PubMed
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Access to kidney transplantation: the limitations of our current understanding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160974
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
John S Gill
Olwyn Johnston
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia - Canada. jgill@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Living Donors
Patient Selection
Registries
Renal Insufficiency - epidemiology - surgery
Residence Characteristics
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Since kidney transplantation (KTX) is the preferred means of treating kidney failure, ensuring that all patients who may benefit from KTX have equal access to this scarce resource is an important objective. Studies focusing on this issue will become increasingly important as the gap between the demand and supply of organs continues to increase, and changes to the United Network of Organ Sharing organ allocation policy are actively debated. However, it is clear that current methods used to study access to KTX have serious limitations. This review highlights the shortcomings of the methods currently used to assess access to KTX, and the limitations of registry data and national wait-list data as information sources to study patient access to KTX. The review also provides suggestions for research and analytical approaches that might be utilized to improve our future understanding of patient access to KTX. The information provided will aid the reader to critically assess issues related to patient access to KTX.
PubMed ID
17918132 View in PubMed
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Access to living donor transplantation for Aboriginal recipients: a study of living donor presentation and exclusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131257
Source
Clin Transplant. 2011 Nov-Dec;25(6):E617-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Dunsmore
M. Karpinski
A. Young
L. Storsley
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
Clin Transplant. 2011 Nov-Dec;25(6):E617-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Diabetes Mellitus - physiopathology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - mortality - surgery
Kidney Transplantation
Living Donors
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Aboriginals experience high rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and are less likely to receive a kidney transplant from a living donor. We hypothesized that higher rates of hypertension and diabetes in Aboriginal communities would result in fewer potential living donors coming forward and more exclusions for medical reasons. We performed a retrospective study to examine the frequency of potential donor presentation and the reasons for donor exclusion among Aboriginal and Caucasian wait-listed ESRD patients at our center. Three hundred and eighty-five wait-listed patients were studied, including 174 Aboriginals and 211 Caucasians. Time on the waiting list was similar between groups. A similar proportion of Aboriginals and Caucasians had at least one potential donor (40% vs. 46%), and the rate of donor exclusion for medical reasons was also similar (23% vs. 21%). Potential donors to Aboriginals were more likely to be excluded for non-medical reasons (50% vs. 30%; p
PubMed ID
21919960 View in PubMed
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Access to organs for transplantation: overcoming "rejection".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239279
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 15;132(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1985
Author
M A Somerville
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 15;132(2):113-7
Date
Jan-15-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadaver
Canada
Commerce
Contract Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethics, Medical
Graft Rejection
Health Services Accessibility - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Tissue Donors - psychology
Abstract
Recent success in overcoming rejection of transplanted organs has led to a much greater demand for organs from donors and to a reconsideration of mechanisms for increasing the availability of organs from cadavers. In the latter respect the two basic systems are "contracting-in" and "contracting-out". Each system has different benefits and harms, and it is a value judgement that should be adopted. However, both systems raise legal, ethical and practical issues that must be addressed if organs for transplantation are to become available to all who need them.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Feb 18;1(8373):407-811644279
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1983 Apr;13(2):20-26853148
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1983 Dec;13(6):23-326360951
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1983 May;143(5):975-86679240
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Mar 29;310(13):864-86366555
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1984 Feb;14(1):22-36715148
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Mar 23-30;251(12):15926700059
PubMed ID
3880649 View in PubMed
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697 records – page 1 of 70.