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Birth weight and risk of renal cell cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19974
Source
Kidney Int. 2001 Mar;59(3):1110-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
A. Bergström
P. Lindblad
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.bergstrom@mep.ki.se
Source
Kidney Int. 2001 Mar;59(3):1110-3
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Birth weight
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prenatal period has been suggested to be important for future cancer risk. Conditions in utero are also important for the development of the kidney, and birth weight, a marker of fetal nutrition and growth, is linearly correlated with the number of nephrons and the structural and functional unit of the kidney. An association between birth weight and renal cell cancer, the major form of kidney cancer, is biologically plausible, but has never been studied. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, case-controlled study in Sweden of men and women aged 20 to 79 years. We collected self-reported information on categories of birth weight from 648 patients with newly diagnosed renal cell cancer and from 900 frequency-matched control subjects. We used unconditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as estimates of the relative risks. RESULTS: An increased risk of renal cell cancer was observed among men with a birth weight of > or =3500 g (adjusted OR = 1.3, 95% CI, 1.0 to 1.8) compared with men with a birth weight between 3000 and 3499 g, especially in the subgroup without hypertension or diabetes (adjusted OR = 1.8, 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.6). No clear association among men with a birth weight
PubMed ID
11231367 View in PubMed
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Childhood cancer and paternal employment in agriculture: the role of pesticides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21734
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(5):825-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
N T Fear
E. Roman
G. Reeves
B. Pannett
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(5):825-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Agriculture
Brazil - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Paternal Exposure
Pesticides - adverse effects
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Wilms Tumor - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the offspring of men potentially exposed to pesticides at work may be at increased risk of kidney cancer (Wilms' tumour), brain tumours, Ewing's bone sarcoma and acute leukaemia. This paper examines the association between potential occupational exposure of fathers to pesticides and offspring's death from cancer in a large national database. Records for 167703 childhood deaths occurring during 1959-63, 1970-78 and 1979-90 in England and Wales have been analysed. Among the offspring of men with potential occupational exposure to pesticides there were 5270 deaths, of which 449 were due to cancer. Associations were assessed using proportional mortality ratios (PMRs), with adjustment for age, year of death and paternal social class. Of the childhood cancers previously linked with potential paternal occupational exposure to pesticides, the only statistically significant excess was for kidney cancer (PMR=1.59, 95% CI=1.18-2.15, based on 42 deaths). Although these results offer some support for the suggestion that paternal occupational exposure to pesticides may be related to the subsequent development of kidney cancer in offspring, other explanations cannot be excluded. In the light of the findings presented here and elsewhere, further, more detailed, research into the nature of this relationship is warranted.
PubMed ID
9514065 View in PubMed
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Diet and vitamin or mineral supplements and risk of renal cell carcinoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182393
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Oct;14(8):705-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Jinfu Hu
Yang Mao
Kathy White
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Oct;14(8):705-14
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Diet
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
To assess the role of diet and vitamin or mineral supplements in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk.
Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1279 (691 male and 588 female) newly diagnosed histologically confirmed RCC cases and 5370 (2696 male and 2674 female) population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. Measurement included information on socioeconomic status, smoking habits, alcohol use, diet, and vitamin or mineral supplements. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived through unconditional logistic regression.
A significant inverse association with RCC was observed with increasing total consumption of vegetables and vegetable juices for males and females combined. Increased consumption for two specific vegetable groups was inversely associated among females but not males: for females, the adjusted ORs for the highest quartile of consumption compared with the lowest were 0.5 (95% CI = 0.4-0.7) and 0.6 (95% CI = 0.4-0.8), p
PubMed ID
14674734 View in PubMed
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Dietary risk factors for renal cell carcinoma in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22695
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
A. Mellemgaard
J K McLaughlin
K. Overvad
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Fats
Dietary Proteins
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals
Sex Factors
Vitamins
Abstract
The role of diet in the aetiology of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in a population-based case-control study in Denmark. Cases were 20-79 years old, with a histologically verified diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Controls were sampled from the general population and were frequency-matched on age and sex. A total of 351 cases (73% of the eligible) and 340 controls (68% of the eligible) were included in the study. Dietary information was obtained in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and the information was confirmed in a subsequent interview performed by trained interviewers who also elicited information on other suspected risk factors such as smoking, occupation, medical history, education and reproductive history. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios, and, both frequency of consumption of various food stuffs and computed nutrients were examined. A positive association was observed between risk of renal cell carcinoma and total energy intake (odds ratio, OR, for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.7 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.0-3.0) for men, and 3.5 (95% CI 1.6-6.5) for women), fat intake (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.9 (95% CI 1.1-3.5) for men, and 3.3 (95% CI 1.6-6.9) for women). For women, an effect was also seen for intake of carbohydrates (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 3.2 (95% CI 1.5-6.8), while no protective effect was seen for vegetables or fruit. Dairy products may be associated with risk of renal cell cancer (OR for women using thickly spread butter compared to thinly spread: 11.4 (95% CI 2.8-45), OR for women who drank more than one glass of milk with 3.5% fat content compared to never drink milk: 3.7 (95% CI 1.2-11). As expected, total energy intake, intake of fat, protein and carbohydrates were closely correlated making it difficult to identify one of the energy sources as more closely associated with risk of renal cell cancer than the other. Several energy sources have been identified as possible risk factors for renal cell carcinoma. It is possible that a high energy intake as such rather than the individual sources are responsible for the increased risk. Furthermore, dairy fats may be associated with renal cell carcinoma risk. The observed associations appeared stronger in women, and did not explain the association with obesity and low socio-economic status previously found in Denmark.
PubMed ID
8695272 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of renal-cell carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11081
Source
J Nephrol. 1997 Mar-Apr;10(2):93-106
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Tavani
C. La Vecchia
Author Affiliation
Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy.
Source
J Nephrol. 1997 Mar-Apr;10(2):93-106
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Diet
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Renal-cell cancer is responsible for about 2% of all cancer deaths in developed countries and represents 80-85% of all tumors of the kidney. Its etiology is still largely undefined. Recently the results of a large international population-based case-control study (International Renal-Cell Cancer Study), conducted between 1989 and 1991 in Australia, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and USA, including 1732 cases and 2309 controls, showed an increased risk of renal-cell cancer in relation to tobacco smoking, elevated body mass index, a few medical conditions, the use of beta-blockers, a family history of the disease, high intake of dairy products and low intake of fruit and vegetables and, in women, multiparity. Most other studies agree about a causal role of cigarette smoking in the etiology of renal-cell cancer, although its association is less strong than for several other tobacco-related neoplasms, with a relative risk of about 2 for current smokers. Other established risk factors are elevated body mass index (mainly in women) and a family history of the disease. Occupational exposure to chemicals appears to have little significance, although associations with specific products, such as asbestos fibres, have been reported. Some relationship has been observed between renal-cell cancer and hypertension, use of anti-hypertensives and kidney diseases, although this issue remains open to discussion. Data are inconsistent on the role of nutrition, mainly for fats and proteins, while vegetable and fruit consumption seems to convey some protection on renal-cell cancer risk. The risk of renal-cell cancer was not materially elevated in relation to coffee, tea and alcohol intake and, in women, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, and menstrual factors.
PubMed ID
9238616 View in PubMed
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International renal-cell cancer study. III. Role of weight, height, physical activity, and use of amphetamines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23344
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 27;60(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-1995
Author
A. Mellemgaard
P. Lindblad
B. Schlehofer
R. Bergström
J S Mandel
M. McCredie
J K McLaughlin
S. Niwa
N. Odaka
W. Pommer
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 27;60(3):350-4
Date
Jan-27-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amphetamines - adverse effects
Body Weight
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Risk
Abstract
Although numerous studies have identified obesity or high relative weight as a risk factor for renal-cell cancer in women, the degree to which this effect is present in men remains unclear. A multicenter population-based case-control study concerning incident cases of histologically verified renal-cell cancer (n = 1,732) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 2,309) was conducted in Australia, Denmark, Germany (2 centers), Sweden and the United States. Relative weight was estimated by the body mass index, and the association between this factor and other factors, such as height, physical activity and use of amphetamines, was measured by the relative risk estimated in logistic regression models. Body mass index was found to be a risk factor among women and, to a lesser extent, among men. A 3-fold increased risk (RR = 3.6, 95% CI = 2.3-5.7) was observed for women with a relative weight in the top 5% compared with those in the lowest quartile. Rate of weight change (estimated as weight change per annum in kilograms) appeared to be an independent risk factor among women but not among men. Physical activity and height were unrelated to risk of renal-cell cancer regardless of level of BMI, while use of amphetamines was associated with an increased risk among men, although no dose or duration effect was seen. Our findings verify the link between high relative weight and risk of renal-cell cancer, particularly among women. The mechanism that underlies this association is, however, still unclear, although the rate of weight change may play a role.
PubMed ID
7829243 View in PubMed
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International renal-cell cancer study. I. Tobacco use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23349
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 17;60(2):194-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1995
Author
J K McLaughlin
P. Lindblad
A. Mellemgaard
M. McCredie
J S Mandel
B. Schlehofer
W. Pommer
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Etiology, Bethesda, MD.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 17;60(2):194-8
Date
Jan-17-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The relationship between renal-cell cancer (RCC) and tobacco use was investigated in an international, multicenter, population-based case-control study. Coordinated studies were conducted in Australia, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and the United States using a shared protocol and questionnaire. A total of 1,732 cases (1,050 men, 682 women) and 2,309 controls (1,429 men, 880 women) were interviewed for the study. No association was observed between risk and use of cigars, pipes or smokeless tobacco. A statistically significant association was observed for cigarette smoking, with current smokers having a 40% increase in risk [relative risk (RR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.7]. Risk increased with intensity (number of cigarettes) and duration (years smoked). Among current smokers the RR for pack-years rose from 1.1 (95% CI 0.8-1.5) for 42 pack years (p for trend 15 years) experienced a reduction in risk of about 15-25% relative to current smokers. Those who started smoking late (> 24 years of age) had about two-thirds the risk of those who started young (
PubMed ID
7829215 View in PubMed
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International renal-cell cancer study. VIII. Role of diuretics, other anti-hypertensive medications and hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23045
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Oct 9;63(2):216-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1995
Author
J K McLaughlin
W H Chow
J S Mandel
A. Mellemgaard
M. McCredie
P. Lindblad
B. Schlehofer
W. Pommer
S. Niwa
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20850, USA.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Oct 9;63(2):216-21
Date
Oct-9-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Diuretics - adverse effects - classification
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Odds Ratio
Risk
Abstract
Risk of renal-cell cancer in relation to use of diuretics, other anti-hypertensive medications and hypertension was assessed in a multi-center, population-based, case-control study conducted in Australia, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and the United States, using a shared protocol and questionnaire. A total of 1,732 histologically confirmed cases and 2,309 controls, frequency-matched to cases by age and sex, were interviewed. The association between renal-cell cancer and the drugs was estimated by relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Risks were increased among users of diuretics and other anti-hypertensive medications. After adjustment for hypertension, risk for diuretics was reduced to unity, except among long-term (15+ years) users. Risk for use of non-diuretic anti-hypertensive drugs remained significantly elevated and increased further with duration of use. Overall risk was not enhanced when both classes of medications were used. Excess risk was not restricted to any specific type of diuretic or anti-hypertensive drug and no trend was observed with estimated lifetime consumption of any particular type of product. The RR for hypertension after adjustment for diuretics and other anti-hypertensive medications was 1.4 (95% CI = 1.2-1.7), although among non-users of any anti-hypertensive medications, there was little excess risk associated with a history of hypertension. Exclusion of drug use that first occurred within 5 years of cancer diagnosis or interview did not alter the associations. Our findings suggest small effects on renal-cell cancer risk associated with hypertension and use of diuretics and other anti-hypertensive medications. However, because of potential misclassifications of these highly correlated variables, it is difficult to distinguish the effect of treatment from its indication, hypertension.
PubMed ID
7591207 View in PubMed
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International renal cell cancer study. VII. Role of diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11286
Source
Int J Cancer. 1996 Jan 3;65(1):67-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-3-1996
Author
A. Wolk
G. Gridley
S. Niwa
P. Lindblad
M. McCredie
A. Mellemgaard
J S Mandel
J. Wahrendorf
J K McLaughlin
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1996 Jan 3;65(1):67-73
Date
Jan-3-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
We investigated the role of diet in the etiology of renal cell cancer (RCC) in a multi-center, population-based case-control study conducted in Australia, Denmark, Sweden and the United States, using a shared protocol. A total of 1,185 incident histopathologically confirmed cases (698 men, 487 women) and 1,526 controls (915 men, 611 women) frequency-matched to cases by sex and age were included in the analyses. The association between RCC and diet was estimated by relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, sex, study center, body mass index and smoking. A statistically significant positive association was observed for total energy intake (RR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.4-2.2 for the highest vs. lowest quartile, p value for trend
PubMed ID
8543399 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.