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Acrylamide intake through diet and human cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92784
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2008
Author
Mucci Lorelei A
Wilson Kathryn M
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. lmucci@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Date
Aug-13-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Adult
Animals
Body Weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Models, Animal
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
More than one-third of the calories consumed by U.S. and European populations contain acrylamide, a substance classified as a "probable human carcinogen" based on laboratory data. Thus, it is a public health concern to evaluate whether intake of acrylamide at levels found in the food supply is an important cancer risk factor. Mean dietary intake of acrylamide in adults averages 0.5 microg/kg of body weight per day, whereas intake is higher among children. Several epidemiological studies examining the relationship between dietary intake of acrylamide and cancers of the colon, rectum, kidney, bladder, and breast have been undertaken. These studies found no association between intake of specific foods containing acrylamide and risk of these cancers. Moreover, there was no relationship between estimated acrylamide intake in the diet and cancer risk. Results of this research are compared with other epidemiological studies, and the findings are examined in the context of data from animal models. The importance of epidemiological studies to establish the public health risk associated with acrylamide in food is discussed, as are the limitations and future directions of such studies.
PubMed ID
18624443 View in PubMed
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Active and passive smoking and risk of renal cell carcinoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175756
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2005 Mar;41(5):770-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Jinfu Hu
Anne-Marie Ugnat
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, 120 Colonnade Road 6702A, AL: 6702A, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. jinfu_hu@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2005 Mar;41(5):770-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the role of active and passive smoking in the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1279 incident RCC cases and 5370 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. Data were collected on socio-economic status, smoking habits, diet and passive smoking status, as well as residential and occupational history. The study found an increased risk of RCC associated with active smoking. Elevated risk of RCC was also observed with passive smoking; compared with those never exposed to either passive or active smoking, men and women with 43 or more years of passive residential and/or occupational exposure had respective adjusted Odds Ratios (ORs) of 3.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.4-10.6) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-3.3) (P=0.001 and P=0.09, respectively). Both active and passive smoking might play a role in the aetiology of RCC.
PubMed ID
15763654 View in PubMed
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Acute hepatic porphyria and cancer risk: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285629
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):229-240
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
C M Baravelli
S. Sandberg
A K Aarsand
R M Nilsen
M C Tollånes
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):229-240
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Porphobilinogen Synthase - deficiency
Porphyrias, Hepatic - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acute hepatic porphyria (AHP) is considered to be a risk factor for primary liver cancer (PLC), but varying risk estimates have been published.
Our aim was to investigate the risk of PLC and other cancers in persons with AHP using a nationwide cohort design. Given that greater numbers of women than men tend to have manifest and more severe AHP, a further aim was to investigate sex differences in this risk.
The study sample consisted of all Norwegian residents aged 18 years or older during the period 2000-2011. Persons with AHP (n = 251) were identified through the Norwegian Porphyria Centre, and patients with a cancer diagnosis were identified by linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway.
For persons with AHP, the annual incidence rate of PLC was 0.35%. PLC risk was substantially higher for individuals with an AHP diagnosis compared to the reference population [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 108, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56-207]. In a meta-analysis of published studies on PLC and AHP, including ours, women had a higher risk than men. In addition, our results suggested that persons with AHP may have increased risks of kidney (aHR 7.4, 95% CI 2.4-23.1) and endometrial cancers (aHR 6.2, 95% CI 2.0-19.3).
Our findings confirmed a substantially higher risk of PLC associated with AHP compared to the general population. In a meta-analysis, the risk was shown to be greater for women than men. The novel findings of a moderate to substantial association between AHP and kidney and endometrial cancers should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
28730628 View in PubMed
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Age-specific familial risks for renal cell carcinoma with evidence on recessive heritable effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17710
Source
Kidney Int. 2004 Jun;65(6):2298-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Kidney Int. 2004 Jun;65(6):2298-302
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Female
Genes, Recessive
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Systematic comparisons of mode of inheritance for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have not been carried out. The occurrence of cancer in parents and offspring may be due to dominant causes, whereas cancer affecting only siblings may indicate a recessive causation. Environmental effects need to be excluded. METHODS: The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born after 1931 with their biologic parents, totaling 10.2 million persons. Cancer data were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry from years 1961 to 2000, included 2415 cases of RCC in offspring and 18531 in parents. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% CI limits were calculated for offspring whose parents or sibling were diagnosed with RCC. RESULTS: The SIRs for siblings for RCC depended on their age difference. SIR was 7.63 (95% CI 3.63-14.08) when the age difference was less than 3 years and compared to 3.43 (95% CI 1.77-6.02) for large age difference. SIRs for familial risk of RCC were 1.73 (95% CI 1.31-2.26) when a parent and 4.58 (95% CI 2.87-6.94) when a sibling had RCC. Age-specific analysis of familial RCC among siblings revealed maxima at ages 40 to 49 and 60 to 68 years. CONCLUSION: The findings in the present study offer evidence on recessive effects in early onset RCC.
PubMed ID
15149343 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a prospective study of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9191
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Dec 10;117(5):848-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2005
Author
Bahram Rashidkhani
Agneta Akesson
Per Lindblad
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Dec 10;117(5):848-53
Date
Dec-10-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous literature, although not consistent, suggests that moderate alcohol consumption might be associated with decreased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in women. Thus, we examined the association between alcohol intake and the incidence of RCC by analyzing data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based prospective cohort of 59,237 women, aged 40-76 years, who, at baseline in 1987-1990, were cancer free and had completed a food-frequency questionnaire including questions about alcohol consumption. Through June 30, 2004, 132 incident cases of RCC were diagnosed. We used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate age and body mass index (BMI) adjusted rate ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Women who consumed >4.3 grams per day of alcohol (ethanol) had nonsignificantly lower risk of RCC than did women who consumed or = 55 years of age at entry into the cohort, corresponding risk estimates were RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.10-1.05, p for trend = 0.04 and among women with BMI >25 kg/m2, RR = 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.97, p for trend = 0.04. Consistent with these findings, women who drank 1 or more servings of total alcoholic beverages per week had lower RCC risk than did women who drank less (RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.94); the corresponding estimate for women > or = 55 years of age was RR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.22-0.88. Results from our prospective cohort study of middle-aged and elderly women indicate that moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with decreased risk of RCC.
PubMed ID
15957170 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and renal cell carcinoma in Canadian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157674
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jinfu Hu
Yue Chen
Yang Mao
Marie Desmeules
Les Mery
Author Affiliation
Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 120 Colonnade Road, AL 6701A, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Jinfu_Hu@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):7-14
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is inversely associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but sex-specific results are inconsistent. The present study examines the association between alcohol intake and the risk of RCC among men and women.
Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1138 newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed RCC cases and 5039 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. A food frequency questionnaire provided data on eating habits and alcohol consumption 2 years before data collection. Other information included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits, alcohol use, and diet. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived through unconditional logistic regression.
Total alcohol intake was inversely associated with RCC in men and in women; the OR for the highest intake group (> or =22.3 g/day among men and > or =7.9 g/day among women) versus the non-drinkers was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5-0.9) for both sexes. Analysis of menopausal status produced ORs for the highest intake group versus the non-drinkers of 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7-2.1) among premenopausal women and 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) among postmenopausal women. Smoking and obesity were not important effect modifiers.
Moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with a decreased risk of RCC in men and in women (mainly postmenopausal women).
PubMed ID
18420355 View in PubMed
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Source
Nature. 2016 Sep 14;537(7620):S103-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-2016
Author
Jesse Emspak
Source
Nature. 2016 Sep 14;537(7620):S103-4
Date
Sep-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Age Factors - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Aged - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Body Mass Index - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Diuretics - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Ethanol - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Female - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Gene-Environment Interaction - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Humans - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Life Style - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Male - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Middle Aged - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Risk Factors - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Sex Factors - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology - genetics - statistics & numerical data - pharmacology - administration & dosage - pharmacology - epidemiology - classification - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - epidemiology - epidemiology - epidemiology
PubMed ID
27626777 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic beverages and risk of renal cell cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162295
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Aug 6;97(3):429-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-6-2007
Author
J P Greving
J E Lee
A. Wolk
C. Lukkien
P. Lindblad
A. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Aug 6;97(3):429-33
Date
Aug-6-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Beverages
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Using a mailed questionnaire, we investigated the risk of renal cell cancer in relation to different types of alcoholic beverages, and to total ethanol in a large population-based case-control study among Swedish adults, including 855 cases and 1204 controls. Compared to non-drinkers, a total ethanol intake of >620 g month(-1) was significantly related to a decreased risk of renal cell cancer (odds ratio (OR) 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4-0.9; P-value for trend=0.03). The risk decreased 30-40% with drinking more than two glasses per week of red wine (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9), white wine (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-1.0), or strong beer (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-1.0); there was a clear linear trend of decreasing risk with increasing consumption of these beverages (P-values for trends
Notes
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PubMed ID
17653076 View in PubMed
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Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and the risk of cancer: a population-based cohort study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19411
Source
Cancer. 2001 Nov 1;92(9):2462-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2001
Author
S. Friis
H T Sørensen
L. Mellemkjaer
J K McLaughlin
G L Nielsen
W J Blot
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. friis@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer. 2001 Nov 1;92(9):2462-70
Date
Nov-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A recent observational study suggested that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors protects against cancer in general and against breast and female reproductive tract cancers in particular. To explore these hypotheses, the authors examined cancer risk among users of ACE inhibitors in North Jutland County, Denmark. METHODS: Using data from the population-based Prescription Database of North Jutland County and the Danish Cancer Registry, cancer incidence among 17,897 individuals prescribed ACE inhibitors was compared with expected incidence based on county specific cancer rates during an 8-year study period with a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for cancers overall and at selected sites. In addition, the authors performed a direct comparison of users of ACE inhibitors with users of beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers (n = 47,579 individuals) by means of a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Overall, 909 cancer cases were observed among users of ACE inhibitors, with 846 expected based on general population rates, yielding an SIR of 1.07 (95% CI, 1.01-1.15). No risk reductions were observed for cancers of the breast and female reproductive tract, whereas nonsignificantly decreased SIRs were observed for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Cancer of the kidney was found in significant excess (SIR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.2). Stratification by duration of follow-up or number of prescriptions revealed no apparent trends, except for a tendency toward decreasing risk with increasing length of follow-up for smoking-related cancers. The direct comparison of users of ACE inhibitors with users of beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers yielded results comparable to those derived from the comparison with the general population, with a hazard ratio for cancer overall of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.93-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: This large, population-based cohort study did not confirm a protective effect of ACE inhibitors on the development of cancer. The excess of kidney cancer observed likely reflects a correlation between hypertension and kidney cancer. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of ACE inhibitors beyond the observation period of this and previous studies. Also, the suggestive evidence of decreased risks for upper digestive system cancers and for smoking-related cancers over time may warrant additional investigation.
PubMed ID
11745304 View in PubMed
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Association of albuminuria and cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86667
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 May;19(5):992-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jørgensen Lone
Heuch Ivar
Jenssen Trond
Jacobsen Bjarne K
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. lone.jorgensen@ism.uit.no
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 May;19(5):992-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Albuminuria, which is associated with noncardiovascular mortality, might be a result of altered vascular permeability caused by cytokines and other tumor cell products. The aim of this population-based, longitudinal study was to examine whether elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) is associated with cancer incidence. A total of 5425 participants without diabetes or previous cancer in the Tromsø Study were followed; 590 had a first diagnosis of cancer during 10.3 yr of follow-up. The ACR at baseline significantly correlated with the incidence of cancer, even after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, physical activity, and smoking (P
PubMed ID
18256361 View in PubMed
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142 records – page 1 of 15.