Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

Baseline anemia is not a predictor of all-cause mortality in outpatients with advanced heart failure or severe renal dysfunction. Results from the Norwegian Heart Failure Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127818
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Jan 24;59(4):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-2012
Author
Bård Waldum
Arne S Westheim
Leiv Sandvik
Berit Flønæs
Morten Grundtvig
Lars Gullestad
Torstein Hole
Ingrid Os
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. bard.waldum@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Jan 24;59(4):371-8
Date
Jan-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - epidemiology - etiology
Biological Markers - blood
Female
Heart Failure - blood - complications - mortality
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of anemia in outpatients with chronic heart failure attending specialized heart failure clinics and specifically to investigate its prognostic utility in patients with severe renal dysfunction or advanced heart failure.
Anemia is an independent prognostic marker in patients with heart failure. The effect of anemia on mortality decreases with increasing creatinine levels.
Multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to investigate the prognostic effect of anemia in 4,144 patients with heart failure from 21 outpatient heart failure clinics in Norway. Severe renal failure was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate =45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and advanced heart failure as New York Heart Association functional classes IIIb and IV.
Baseline anemia was present in 24% and was a strong predictor of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.56, p = 0.004). Baseline anemia did not predict mortality in the 752 patients with severe renal dysfunction (adjusted HR: 1.08, 95 % CI: 0.77 to 1.51, p = 0.662) and the 528 patients with advanced heart failure (adjusted HR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.34, p = 0.542). In the 1,743 patients who attended subsequent visits, sustained anemia independently predicted worse prognosis (adjusted HR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.94, p = 0.008), whereas transient and new-onset anemia did not.
According to our study, baseline anemia was not an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in outpatients with heart failure and accompanied severe renal dysfunction or advanced heart disease. Sustained anemia after optimizing heart failure treatment might imply worse prognosis independently of renal function and New York Heart Association functional class.
PubMed ID
22261159 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body fat mass and serum leptin levels influence epoetin sensitivity in patients with ESRD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83235
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2005 Oct;46(4):628-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Axelsson Jonas
Qureshi Abdul Rashid
Heimbürger Olof
Lindholm Bengt
Stenvinkel Peter
Bárány Peter
Author Affiliation
Division of Renal Medicine, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2005 Oct;46(4):628-34
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Anemia - drug therapy - etiology
Body Composition
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug resistance
Erythropoiesis - drug effects - physiology
Erythropoietin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - pharmacokinetics - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Female
Ferritins - blood
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Inflammation
Interleukin-6 - blood
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - pathology - therapy
Leptin - blood - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Size
Polycystic Kidney Diseases - blood - complications
Renal Dialysis
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dose requirements of epoetin vary considerably among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), whereas determinants of epoetin sensitivity are poorly understood. Fat mass is an important source of adipokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), which is associated with decreased epoetin sensitivity. Furthermore, the adipokine leptin stimulates human erythroid development in vitro. In the present study, we investigate the impact of fat mass and leptin level on epoetin sensitivity in patients with ESRD. METHODS: One hundred sixty-six patients with ESRD (107 men; 64%) with a mean age of 56.9 +/- 0.9 years were studied in a post hoc cross-sectional analysis. Body composition was analyzed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and correlated with serum markers of inflammation and leptin (analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), as well as with epoetin dose, in international units administered per week (IU/wk). To correct for differences in body mass and hemoglobin (Hb) levels, epoetin sensitivity was approximated as epoetin/Hb ratio, ie, epoetin dose per unit of Hb (IU/wk/g/dL) and epoetin/Hb/kg ratio, ie, epoetin dose per unit of Hb and kilogram of patient body weight (IU/wk/Hb/kg). RESULTS: Patients were divided into 3 groups according to epoetin/Hb/kg ratio (no-epoetin group, low-epoetin group, and high-epoetin group). The 3 groups had significantly different serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP; median, 8.6 versus 3.1 and 8.0 mg/L, respectively; P
Notes
Comment In: Am J Kidney Dis. 2006 Feb;47(2):371; author reply 37216431269
PubMed ID
16183417 View in PubMed
Less detail

A cross-sectional immunosurveillance study of anti-EPO antibody levels in CRF patients receiving epoetin alfa in 5 Ontario Renal Centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179154
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2004 Aug;44(2):264-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
George Wu
Arturo Wadgymar
Gordon Wong
Robert Ting
Bharat Nathoo
David Mendelssohn
Sanjay Pandeya
Daniel Sapir
Paul Tam
Author Affiliation
Institute of Kidney Lifescience Technologies, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. diadochk@yahoo.ca
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2004 Aug;44(2):264-9
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - drug therapy - etiology
Autoantibodies - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - drug therapy - etiology - immunology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cyclosporine - therapeutic use
Erythropoietin - immunology - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - immunology - therapy
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Peritoneal dialysis
Population Surveillance
Radioimmunoprecipitation Assay
Recombinant Proteins
Red-Cell Aplasia, Pure - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Renal Dialysis
Abstract
Epoetin alfa (Eprex*; Johnson & Johnson, Manati, PR) has been used successfully to correct the anemia of chronic renal failure for more than 12 years. Anti-erythropoietin (anti-EPO) antibodies have been reported in a small number of patients, resulting in a blood disorder, pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). To evaluate the utility of a large-scale anti-EPO antibody screening program in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) administered epoetin alfa, a study involving 5 large renal centers in southern Ontario, Canada, was conducted.
More than 1,500 hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and predialysis patients were screened for the prevalence of anti-EPO antibodies by means of a radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) assay. Serum samples were drawn and shipped to PPD Development (Richmond, VA) for the immunoprecipitation assay. Serum EPO levels also were measured. All samples that tested positive or borderline for antibodies were sent to MDS Pharma Services (Montreal, Canada) for the neutralization assay.
Of 1,531 samples tested, 1 patient tested low-positive and 3 borderline results were detected by means of RIP. PRCA previously was diagnosed in the patient with the low-positive antibody level; the patient was treated with cyclosporine and currently is being administered epoetin alfa with good response. The 3 patients with borderline antibody results manifested no clinical signs of PRCA. Neutralization assays performed on all 4 serum samples were negative for anti-EPO antibodies.
Results from this surveillance study show that the prevalence of antibody to EPO in patients with CKD administered epoetin alfa in 5 Canadian renal centers is low, and the value of a large-scale antibody screening program for PRCA cannot be justified.
PubMed ID
15264184 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of Cinacalcet and Vitamin D Analogs on Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 during the Treatment of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270836
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015 Jun 5;10(6):1021-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-2015
Author
Stuart M Sprague
James B Wetmore
Konstantin Gurevich
Gerald Da Roza
John Buerkert
Maureen Reiner
William Goodman
Kerry Cooper
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015 Jun 5;10(6):1021-30
Date
Jun-5-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Australia
Biomarkers - blood
Calcimimetic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Calcium - blood
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Cinacalcet Hydrochloride - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Fibroblast Growth Factors - blood
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphorus - blood
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects
Risk factors
Russia
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States
Vitamin D - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Abstract
Cinacalcet and vitamin D are often combined to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in patients on dialysis. Independent effects on fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) concentrations in patients on hemodialysis administered cinacalcet or vitamin D analogs as monotherapies during treatment of SHPT are evaluated.
A multicenter, randomized, open-label study to compare the efficacy of cinacalcet versus traditional vitamin D therapy for management of secondary hyperparathyroidism among subjects undergoing hemodialysis (PARADIGM) was a prospective, phase 4, multicenter, randomized, open-label study conducted globally. Participants (n=312) were randomized 1:1 to cinacalcet (n=155) or vitamin D analog (n=157) for 52 weeks. Levels of FGF-23 were measured at baseline and weeks 20 and 52. The absolute and percentage changes from baseline in plasma FGF-23, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and calcium-phosphorus product (Ca×P) were assessed. Correlations and logistic regression were used to explore relationships between changes in FGF-23 and changes in PTH, Ca, P, and Ca×P from baseline to week 52 by treatment arm.
Median (quartiles 1, 3) decrease in FGF-23 concentrations was observed in the cinacalcet arm (-40%; -63%, 16%) compared with median increase in the vitamin D analog arm (47%; 0%, 132%) at week 52 (P
Notes
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2008;26(4):301-1118600395
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2004 Sep;44(3):481-715332221
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Oct;24(10):1681-519419295
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Jan;5(1):110-619965548
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Feb;5(2):286-9119965540
Cites: Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2010 Jun;298(6):F1315-2220200094
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jun;95(6):2772-8020382692
Cites: Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2010 Jul;19(4):335-4220583336
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Jul;21(7):1125-3520431039
Cites: Kidney Int. 2010 Sep;78(5):463-7220531451
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Apr 6;101(14):5140-515051872
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E652-824476081
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 May;17(5):1305-1516597685
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Jan;3(1):36-4518178780
Cites: Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2010 Oct;299(4):F882-920685823
Cites: Kidney Int. 2011 Jan;79(1):112-920861820
Cites: Nephron Clin Pract. 2011;117(1):c74-8220689328
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2011 Aug;26(8):2430-221803732
Cites: Kidney Int. 2011 Sep;80(5):475-8221525854
Cites: Bone. 2011 Oct;49(4):636-4321726676
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Oct;22(10):1913-2221903574
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2011 Nov;121(11):4393-40821985788
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2012 Feb;59(2):177-8522137672
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Feb;27(2):784-9021730210
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Jun;27(6):2263-922140123
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Aug;23(8):1407-1522822075
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Aug;27(8):3270-822387567
Cites: Int Urol Nephrol. 2012 Oct;44(5):1479-8621874285
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Feb 1;304(3):E310-2023233539
Cites: BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:11223705925
Cites: Clin Nephrol. 2013 Jul;80(1):17-2223391319
Cites: Nat Rev Nephrol. 2013 Nov;9(11):641-923877588
Cites: Endocrinology. 2013 Dec;154(12):4469-8224140714
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2014 Apr;29(4):899-90524500308
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Aug 7;359(6):584-9218687639
PubMed ID
25873267 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of cystatin C levels on angiographic atherosclerosis progression and events among postmenopausal women with angiographically decompensated coronary artery disease (from the Women's Angiographic Vitamin and Estrogen [WAVE] study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115505
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Jun 15;111(12):1681-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2013
Author
Dhavalkumar Patel
Soha Ahmad
Angela Silverman
Joseph Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA. dpatel@mcvh-vcu.edu
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Jun 15;111(12):1681-7
Date
Jun-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atherosclerosis - blood - etiology
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - drug therapy - etiology - mortality - radiography
Cystatin C - blood
Disease Progression
Double-Blind Method
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
End-stage renal disease and mild renal insufficiency are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Cystatin C, a novel marker of kidney function, was found to be associated with a higher frequency of cardiovascular events and mortality independent of glomerular filtration rate. It remained uncertain, however, whether enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with cystatin C is due to accelerated progression of atherosclerosis or to plaque instability. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of baseline cystatin C on annual change in coronary artery narrowing and clinical events in 423 postmenopausal women with angiographically documented coronary artery disease enrolled in the Women's Angiographic Vitamin and Estrogen (WAVE) trial. Baseline and follow-up (mean 2.8 ± 0.9 years) angiography was performed in 320 women. Angiographic progression of disease and clinical events in each cystatin C quartile were compared. Women with cystatin C levels in the highest quartile were older and more likely to have histories of heart failure and stroke. Annualized changes in minimal and average luminal diameters were similar in diseased and nondiseased segments. All-cause death or myocardial infarction (3.6% vs 15.6%, p
PubMed ID
23499273 View in PubMed
Less detail

Erythropoietin therapy, hemoglobin targets, and quality of life in healthy hemodialysis patients: a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151735
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Apr;4(4):726-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Robert N Foley
Bryan M Curtis
Patrick S Parfrey
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Research Group and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Apr;4(4):726-33
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia - blood - drug therapy - etiology - psychology
Body mass index
Canada
Erythropoietin - therapeutic use
Europe
Fatigue - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hematinics - therapeutic use
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Recombinant Proteins
Renal Dialysis - psychology
Social Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The effects of different hemoglobin targets when using erythropoiesis-stimulating agents on quality of life are somewhat controversial, and predictors of change in quality of life in endstage renal disease have not been well characterized.
Five hundred ninety-six incident hemodialysis patients without symptomatic cardiac disease were randomly assigned to hemoglobin targets of 9.5 to 11.5 g/dl or 13.5 to 14.5 g/dl for 96 weeks, using epoetin_alfa as primary therapy. Patients and attending physicians were masked to treatment assignment. Quality of life, a secondary outcome, was prospectively recorded using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL) questionnaire at weeks 0, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, and 96, with prespecified outcomes being fatigue and quality of social interaction.
The mean age and prior duration of dialysis therapy of the study population were 50.8 and 0.8 yr. Mortality was low, reflecting the relatively healthy group enrolled. Of 20 domains within the KDQoL only the prespecified domain of fatigue showed significant change over time between the two groups. Improvement in fatigue scores in the high-target group ranged from 3.2 to 7.9 over time (P = 0.007) compared with change in the low-target group. Higher body mass index and lower erythropoietin dose at baseline were independent predictors of improvement in multiple KDQoL domains.
In relatively healthy hemodialysis patients, normal hemoglobin targets may have beneficial effects on fatigue. Improvement in multiple domains of quality of life is associated with higher body mass index and lower erythropoietin requirements.
Notes
Cites: Kidney Int. 2000 Apr;57(4):1720-610760108
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Nov;3(6):1669-7518922988
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 14;346(7):469-7511844847
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2003 Feb;18(2):353-6112543892
Cites: Kidney Int. 2003 Jul;64(1):295-30412787422
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1977 Feb;137(2):172-6836115
Cites: BMJ. 1990 Mar 3;300(6724):573-82108751
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1994 Oct;3(5):329-387841967
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Mar 27;336(13):933-89070475
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Aug 27;339(9):584-909718377
Cites: Am Heart J. 2005 Mar;149(3):408-1315864229
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Jul;16(7):2180-915901766
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Nov 16;355(20):2071-8417108342
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Nov 16;355(20):2085-9817108343
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Feb 3;369(9559):381-817276778
Cites: Kidney Int. 2000 Sep;58(3):1325-3510972697
PubMed ID
19339412 View in PubMed
Less detail

The exercise-during-hemodialysis program: report on a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176170
Source
CANNT J. 1999;9(3):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
J. Ridley
K. Hoey
N. Ballagh-Howes
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario.
Source
CANNT J. 1999;9(3):20-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Erythropoietin - therapeutic use
Exercise Therapy - methods
Fatigue - etiology - prevention & control
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects - nursing
Abstract
Dialysis saves lives. However, dialysis alone cannot make those lives active and meaningful. Exercise, in particular, is critical in the rehabilitation of many individuals with chronic renal insufficiency The purpose of this pilot study was to: 1) examine changes in participants' physical capacity and quality of life with the intervention of a 12-week exercise program; 2) investigate whether erythropoietin (EPO) and antihypertensive medication dosages were reduced in the participants; 3) examine the feasibility of incorporating exercise into the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) hemodialysis program. A quasi-experimental one-group pre- and post-test design was utilized. Eight subjects completed the 12-week study. The exercise program involved a warm-up, stretching, strengthening, and cardiovascular training. The results demonstrated improvements in the participants'physical capacity, quality of life, and ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). There were no discernable trends in the participants' hemoglobin levels or EPO dosages. Although there were no statistically significant changes in participants' blood pressures, five out of the six participants who began the program on antihypertensive medications either had the dosages decreased or the drug(s) discontinued. Data from this small prospective study supports previous research that an exercise during dialysis program is safe and has the potential to result in positive patient outcomes.
PubMed ID
15712469 View in PubMed
Less detail

[False measurement of glucose during dialysis with icodextrin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80700
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Sep 7;126(17):2268-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-2006
Author
Husøy Astrid-Mette
Knudsen Grete Rustan
Thierley Micaela
Svarstad Einar
Author Affiliation
Laboratorium for klinisk biokjemi, Haukeland Universitetssjukehus, 5021 Bergen. astrid.husoy@helse-bergen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Sep 7;126(17):2268-70
Date
Sep-7-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Autoanalysis - instrumentation
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - drug therapy
Dialysis Solutions - adverse effects
False Positive Reactions
Glucans - adverse effects
Glucose - adverse effects
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - therapy
Male
Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory
Point-of-Care Systems - standards
Reference Standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent reports have indicated that icodextrin may interfere with glucose assays when patients are treated with icodextrin for peritoneal dialysis (PD). We wished to examine whether icodextrin interfered with plasma glucose, as measured with new instruments commonly used for glucose measurements in Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Serum and plasma glucose were measured in a diabetic patient (type II) who had started PD with icodextrin. Serum glucose was measured simultaneously in venous blood using the laboratory reference method (hexokinase), and compared with eight point of care testing (POCT) glucometers. The instruments used glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone (GDH-PQQ), glucose dehydrogenase nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (GDH- NAD), or glucose oxidase (GOx) methods. RESULTS: The laboratory reference method for glucose measurements was not affected by icodextrin. Biosensors with GDH-NAD and GOx methods did not give falsely elevated glucose results. Two of the eight POCT glucometers used the GDH-PQQ method. Both Ascensia Contour (Bayer HealthCare) and Accu-Chek (Roche Diagnostics) showed more than 60 % higher glucose values than the reference method. INTERPRETATION: The GDH-PQQ method is non-specific for measurements of glucose. Over-estimation of glucose may result in unrecognized hypoglycaemia. POCT glucometers with a GDH-PQQ based monitoring system should not be used in diabetics receiving icodextrin for PD. The patients and caregivers must be informed about which glucometers to use.
PubMed ID
16967067 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hypokalemia and outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease: findings from propensity-matched studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145822
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2010 Mar;3(2):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
C Barrett Bowling
Bertram Pitt
Mustafa I Ahmed
Inmaculada B Aban
Paul W Sanders
Marjan Mujib
Ruth C Campbell
Thomas E Love
Wilbert S Aronow
Richard M Allman
George L Bakris
Ali Ahmed
Author Affiliation
Section of Geriatrics, VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Ala, USA.
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2010 Mar;3(2):253-60
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Failure - blood - complications - mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypokalemia - etiology - mortality
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - mortality
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Statistics, nonparametric
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about the effects of hypokalemia on outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and chronic kidney disease.
Of the 7788 patients with chronic HF in the Digitalis Investigation Group trial, 2793 had chronic kidney disease, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1999 Mar 16;130(6):461-7010075613
Cites: Circulation. 1999 May 25;99(20):2694-70110338465
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Sep 20;112(12):e154-23516160202
Cites: Nutrition. 2006 May;22(5):581-316600821
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Jun;27(12):1431-916709595
Cites: Lancet. 1981 Sep 12;2(8246):5916116039
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Dec 8;309(23):1414-96314140
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1984 Jun;5(6):464-96745288
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1985 Jul;103(1):1-62860833
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1986 Mar;7(3):204-93709555
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1987 Mar;147(3):465-93827422
Cites: Jpn Heart J. 1989 Mar;30(2):205-172724541
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Oct;18(4):1105-111894855
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2006 Jun 15;97(12):1759-6416765130
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Oct 10;114(15):1572-8017015793
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jan 17;297(3):314-617227985
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2007 Feb 1;99(3):393-817261405
Cites: Circulation. 2007 May 1;115(17):2340-317470708
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 Jun;28(11):1334-4317537738
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2007 Sep;22(9):2455-717557775
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2008 Apr 10;125(2):246-5317706809
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2008 Sep 16;129(1):93-917643517
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2009 May 29;134(3):330-519178965
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2009 Aug;29(8):883-9019637941
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2009 Aug 21;136(3):270-718672302
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2009 Sep 11;137(1):1-818691778
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2008 Sep;1(1):62-720031790
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2010 May 28;141(2):167-7419135741
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2010 Jul 23;142(3):279-8719201041
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2010 Oct 29;144(3):383-819500863
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Apr;54(4):387-9811297888
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2002 Feb;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-26611904577
Cites: Control Clin Trials. 2003 Dec;24(6):726-3014662278
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Jan 21;43(2):155-6114736430
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1980 Feb 21;302(8):431-46101508
Cites: J Mol Cell Cardiol. 1993 May;25(5):563-758377216
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1995 Apr;268(4 Pt 2):R825-377733391
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Feb 20;336(8):525-339036306
Cites: J Card Fail. 1995 Jun;1(3):195-2009420651
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1998 May;274(5 Pt 2):H1598-6049612369
Cites: Stat Med. 1998 Oct 15;17(19):2265-819802183
PubMed ID
20103777 View in PubMed
Less detail

Left ventricular hypertrophy in new hemodialysis patients without symptomatic cardiac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144339
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 May;5(5):805-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Robert N Foley
Bryan M Curtis
Edward W Randell
Patrick S Parfrey
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Research Group, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 May;5(5):805-13
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia - blood - complications - drug therapy
Canada
Disease Progression
England
Erythropoietin - therapeutic use
Female
Hematinics - therapeutic use
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - blood - etiology - ultrasonography
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - complications - therapy
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recombinant Proteins
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Although left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a characteristic finding in hemodialysis (HD) populations, few risk factors for progressive LVH have been identified.
As part of a multinational, blinded, randomized, controlled trial that demonstrated no effect of hemoglobin targets on LV size, 596 incident HD patients, without symptomatic cardiac disease or cardiac dilation, had baseline echocardiograms within 18 months of starting dialysis and subsequently at 24, 48, and 96 weeks later. A wide array of baseline risk factors were assessed, as were BP and hemoglobin levels during the trial.
The median age and duration of dialysis were 51.5 years and 9 months, respectively. LV mass index (LVMI) rose substantially during follow-up (114.2 g/m(2) at baseline, 121 at week 48, 123.4 at week 48, and 128.3 at week 96), as did fractional shortening, whereas LV volume (68.7, 70.1, 68.7, and 68.1 ml/m(2)) and E/A ratio remained unchanged. At baseline, the only multivariate associations of LVMI were gender and N terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide. Comparing first and last echocardiograms in those without LVH at baseline, independent predictors of increase in LVMI were higher time-integrated systolic BP and cause of ESRD. An unadjusted association between baseline LVMI and subsequent cardiovascular events or death was eliminated by adjusting for age, diabetes, systolic BP, and N terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide.
Progressive concentric LVH and hyperkinesis occur in HD patients, which is partly explained by hypertension but not by a wide array of potential risk factors, including anemia.
Notes
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2000 May;11(5):912-610770969
Cites: Hypertension. 1987 Feb;9(2 Pt 2):II19-262948914
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2001 Jul;12(7):1508-1511423580
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2001 Dec;12(12):2759-6711729246
Cites: Ren Fail. 2003 Mar;25(2):287-9512739835
Cites: Circulation. 1971 Apr;43(4):480-905573382
Cites: Circulation. 1978 Dec;58(6):1072-83709763
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 1994 Jan;4(7):1486-908161730
Cites: Kidney Int. 1995 Jan;47(1):186-927731145
Cites: Kidney Int. 1996 May;49(5):1379-858731103
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1996 Jul;28(1):53-618712222
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1996 Jul;11(7):1277-858672023
Cites: Kidney Int. 1996 Aug;50(2):600-88840292
Cites: Kidney Int. 1998 Nov;54(5):1720-59844150
Cites: Kidney Int. 2005 Jan;67(1):217-2615610245
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Jul;16(7):2180-915901766
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Feb;17(2):513-2016396968
Cites: Kidney Int. 2008 Nov;74(10):1335-4218769368
Cites: Kidney Int. 2009 Apr;75(8):800-819165175
Cites: Kidney Int. 2009 Apr;75(8):771-319337217
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Apr;4(4):755-6219339417
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2000 Nov;15(11):1735-811071955
PubMed ID
20378644 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.