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Association of level of kidney function and platelet aggregation in acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88557
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2009 Aug;54(2):262-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Karlsson Fredrik
Modica Angelo
Mooe Thomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Ostersund Hospital, Ostersund, Sweden. fredrik.karlsson@jll.se
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2009 Aug;54(2):262-9
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - physiopathology
Myocardial Infarction - blood - complications - physiopathology
Platelet Aggregation
Prospective Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Decreased kidney function has been established as an important risk factor in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. In acute coronary syndrome, increased platelet aggregation is associated with vascular complications. The aim of this study is to examine whether decreased kidney function is associated with altered platelet function in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 413 patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit at Ostersund Hospital, Ostersund, Sweden. PREDICTORS: Glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) estimated from serum cystatin C level, comorbidity, medications, and markers of inflammation and hemostasis. OUTCOMES & MEASUREMENTS: Platelet aggregation was assessed by measuring the formation of small platelet aggregates (SPAs) by using a laser light scattering method. A greater SPA level indicates greater platelet aggregation. Platelet aggregation analysis was performed on days 1, 2, 3, and 5 in-hospital. RESULTS: We observed a significant increase in platelet aggregation during the first 3 days in the hospital regardless of kidney function (P
PubMed ID
19560852 View in PubMed
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Death, mode of death, morbidity and requirement for rehospitalization during 2 years after coronary artery bypass grafting in relation to preoperative ejection fraction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54603
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 1996 Nov;7(11):807-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
J. Herlitz
G. Brandrup
K. Caidahl
M. Haglid
P. Albertsson
B W Karlson
L. Lurje
T. Karlsson
A. Hjalmarson
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 1996 Nov;7(11):807-12
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Disease - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure, Congestive - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Interviews
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - complications - physiopathology
Patient Readmission
Postoperative Complications
Preoperative Care
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Stroke Volume - physiology
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventricular Fibrillation - etiology - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of ejection fraction on the prognosis during 2 years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). PATIENTS: All patients in western Sweden who underwent CABG without concomitant valve surgery between June 1988 and June 1991. RESULTS: In all, 2121 patients were operated upon and information on ejection fraction was available for 1961 patients (92%). Of these patients, 178 (9%) had an ejection fraction or = 60%. In these groups the mortalities during the first 30 days after CABG were 5.1, 4.3 and 2.2%, respectively (P
PubMed ID
8993937 View in PubMed
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Role of residual renal function in phosphate control and anemia management in chronic hemodialysis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139753
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Feb;6(2):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
E Lars Penne
Neelke C van der Weerd
Muriel P C Grooteman
Albert H A Mazairac
Marinus A van den Dorpel
Menso J Nubé
Michiel L Bots
Renée Lévesque
Piet M ter Wee
Peter J Blankestijn
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Room F03.223, University Medical Center-Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Feb;6(2):281-9
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anemia - blood - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Anuria - blood - etiology - physiopathology
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Hematinics - therapeutic use
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Phosphates - blood
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There is increasing awareness that residual renal function (RRF) has beneficial effects in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RRF, expressed as GFR, in phosphate and anemia management in chronic HD patients.
Baseline data of 552 consecutive patients from the Convective Transport Study (CONTRAST) were analyzed. Patients with a urinary output=100 ml/24 h (n=295) were categorized in tertiles on the basis of degree of GFR and compared with anuric patients (i.e., urinary output4.13 ml/min per 1.73 m2), as compared with 46% in anuric patients despite lower prescription of phosphate-binding agents. Mean hemoglobin levels were 11.9?1.2 g/dl with no differences between the GFR categories. The ESA index was 31% lower in patients in the upper tertile as compared with anuric patients. After adjustments for patient characteristics, patients in the upper tertile had significantly lower serum phosphate levels and ESA index as compared with anuric patients.
This study suggests a strong relation between RRF and improved phosphate and anemia control in HD patients. Efforts to preserve RRF in HD patients could improve outcomes and should be encouraged.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21030579 View in PubMed
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