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7796 records – page 1 of 780.

Disability management in Canada: rights and responsibilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202540
Source
Empl Benefits J. 1998 Mar;23(1):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
L. Steeves
R. Smithies
Author Affiliation
Watson Wyatt Worldwide, Toronto.
Source
Empl Benefits J. 1998 Mar;23(1):37-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Disabled Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Employment, Supported - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Workplace - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
As Canadian employers become more actively involved in disability management, they must be aware of the legislative and regulatory requirements that will affect their programs. Workers' compensation and occupational health and safety legislation are clearly important, but privacy legislation, privacy guidelines, employment standards requirements and common law principles may also be applicable. By addressing their legal obligations when they develop their disability management programs, employers can act in a manner that is both prudent and proactive.
PubMed ID
10177577 View in PubMed
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Lighting requirements of dwellings: a comparison between Russian federation and Italy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287118
Source
Ann Ig. 2016 May-Jun;28(3):202-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Popov
D. D'Alessandro
M. Gaeta
L. Capasso
Source
Ann Ig. 2016 May-Jun;28(3):202-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence
Housing - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Hygiene - legislation & jurisprudence
Italy
Lighting - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Residential Facilities - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Sunlight
Abstract
Good lighting is a key factor for indoor health and wellness. Hygienic regulations regarding illumination requirements have been elaborated much time ago and in different countries. The authors describe these requirements in Italy and in the Russian Federation, analysing their contents and issues and comparing them. The results show that the Russian ones are updated, more precise and complete. In conclusion, the authors stress the strong need for a revision and update of the specific Italian hygienic and sanitary regulations.
PubMed ID
27297196 View in PubMed
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[Restrictions during psychiatric hospitalization].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116990
Source
Duodecim. 2012;128(22):2336-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eila Repo-Tiihonen
Anu Putkonen
Heli Tuppurainen
Author Affiliation
Niuvanniemen sairaala ja Itä-Suomen yliopisto, oikeuspsykiatrian klinikka.
Source
Duodecim. 2012;128(22):2336-43
Date
2012
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Finland
Hospitalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospitals, Psychiatric - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Finnish Constitution affirms that everyone has the right to remain private and undisturbed. During the course of involuntary psychiatric treatment, only the exemptions stipulated in the Mental Health Act are allowed. The Act on the Status and Rights of Patients states that cooperation with the patient must also be attempted during involuntary treatment. The orders for restraints are different in psychiatric hospitals. For decades, restrictions were derived from early 19th century regulations, when all mentally ill individuals were considered to be incompetent. Nowadays, a patient's mental competence is based on functional disabilities, which should also apply to psychiatric treatment.
PubMed ID
23342480 View in PubMed
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The Personal Health Information Protection Act, 1997: the police perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206098
Source
Health Law Can. 1998 May;18(4):126-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998

The regulation of science and the Charter of Rights: would a ban on non-reproductive human cloning unjustifiably violate freedom of expression?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170410
Source
Queens Law J. 2004;29(2):647-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Barbara Billingsley
Timothy Caulfield
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Queens Law J. 2004;29(2):647-79
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Cloning, Organism - legislation & jurisprudence
Embryo Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Freedom
Humans
Jurisprudence
Policy Making
Science - legislation & jurisprudence
Stem Cells
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Non-Reproductive Human Cloning (NRHC) allows researchers to develop and clone cells, including non-reproductive cells, and to research the etiology and transmission of disease. The ability to clone specific stem cells may also allow researchers to clone cells with genetic defects and analyze those cells with more precisions. Despite those potential benefits, Parliament has banned such cloning due to a myriad of social and ethical concerns. In May 2002, the Canadian Government introduced Bill C-13 on assisted human reproductive technologies. Bill C-13 deals with both the scientific and the clinical use of human reproductive materials, and it prohibits a number of other activities, including NRHC. Although the Supreme Court of Canada has never ruled on whether scientific experiments area form of expression, academic support exists for this notion. The authors go through the legal analysis that would be required to find that scientific experiments are expression, focusing in part on whether NRHC could be considered violent and thus fall outside the protection of section 2(b). The latter question is complicated by the ongoing policy debate over whether an "embryonic cell" is property of human life. The authors then consider whether a ban on NRHC could be justified under section 1 of the Charter. They conclude that both the breadth of the legislative purpose and the proportionality of the measure are problematic. Proportionality is a specific concern because the ban could be viewed as an outright denial of scientific freedom of expression. Although consistent with current jurisprudence on freedom of expression, this paper runs against the flow of government policy in the areas of regulation and prohibition of non-reproductive human cloning. As there has been no Charter litigation to date on whether scientific research is a form of expression, the authors introduce a new way of looking at the legality of the regulation of new reproductive technologies.
PubMed ID
16514767 View in PubMed
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European Court of Human Rights. ECHR 2007/16. Case of Yakovenko v. Ukraine, 25 October 2007, no. 15825/06 (Fifth Section).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86613
Source
Eur J Health Law. 2007 Dec;14(4):397-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Source
Child Welfare. 1978 Sep-Oct;57(8):485-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Kleinkauf
B. McGuire
Source
Child Welfare. 1978 Sep-Oct;57(8):485-95
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Child
Child Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Child, Abandoned - legislation & jurisprudence
Child, Institutionalized - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Enactment of alaska's new Children's Code was achieved only after years of struggle involving many professional and public forces. The code is considered a breakthrough in legislation for children.
PubMed ID
710182 View in PubMed
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Radiation safety during remediation of the SevRAO facilities: 10?years of regulatory experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273589
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2015 Sep;35(3):571-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
M K Sneve
N. Shandala
S. Kiselev
A. Simakov
A. Titov
V. Seregin
V. Kryuchkov
V. Shcheblanov
L. Bogdanova
M. Grachev
G M Smith
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2015 Sep;35(3):571-96
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Government Regulation
Humans
Industrial Waste - legislation & jurisprudence
Nuclear Reactors - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence
Radiation Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence
Radiation Protection - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Radioactive Waste - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Safety Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Waste Management - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Abstract
In compliance with the fundamentals of the government's policy in the field of nuclear and radiation safety approved by the President of the Russian Federation, Russia has developed a national program for decommissioning of its nuclear legacy. Under this program, the State Atomic Energy Corporation 'Rosatom' is carrying out remediation of a Site for Temporary Storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RW) at Andreeva Bay located in Northwest Russia. The short term plan includes implementation of the most critical stage of remediation, which involves the recovery of SNF from what have historically been poorly maintained storage facilities. SNF and RW are stored in non-standard conditions in tanks designed in some cases for other purposes. It is planned to transport recovered SNF to PA 'Mayak' in the southern Urals. This article analyses the current state of the radiation safety supervision of workers and the public in terms of the regulatory preparedness to implement effective supervision of radiation safety during radiation-hazardous operations. It presents the results of long-term radiation monitoring, which serve as informative indicators of the effectiveness of the site remediation and describes the evolving radiation situation. The state of radiation protection and health care service support for emergency preparedness is characterized by the need to further study the issues of the regulator-operator interactions to prevent and mitigate consequences of a radiological accident at the facility. Having in mind the continuing intensification of practical management activities related to SNF and RW in the whole of northwest Russia, it is reasonable to coordinate the activities of the supervision bodies within a strategic master plan. Arrangements for this master plan are discussed, including a proposed programme of actions to enhance the regulatory supervision in order to support accelerated mitigation of threats related to the nuclear legacy in the area.
PubMed ID
26160861 View in PubMed
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7796 records – page 1 of 780.