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A 35-year follow-up study on burnout among Finnish employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133208
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jari J Hakanen
Arnold B Bakker
Markku Jokisaari
Author Affiliation
Centre of Excellence for Work Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jari.hakanen@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aptitude
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
This three-wave 35-year prospective study used the Job Demands-Resources model and life course epidemiology to examine how life conditions in adolescence (1961-1963) through achieved educational level and working conditions in early adulthood (1985) may be indirectly related to job burnout 35 years later (1998). We used data (N = 511) from the Finnish Healthy Child study (1961-1963) to investigate the hypothesized relationships by employing structural equation modeling analyses. The results supported the hypothesized model in which both socioeconomic status and cognitive ability in adolescence (1961-1963) were positively associated with educational level (measured in 1985), which in turn was related to working conditions in early adulthood (1985). Furthermore, working conditions (1985) were associated with job burnout (1998) 13 years later. Moreover, adult education (1985) and skill variety (1985) mediated the associations between original socioeconomic status and cognitive ability, and burnout over a 35-year time period. The results suggest that socioeconomic, individual, and work-related resources may accumulate over the life course and may protect employees from job burnout.
PubMed ID
21728440 View in PubMed
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Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism among hospital nurses: an idiographic-longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230791
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
R D Hackett
P. Bycio
R M Guion
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Attitude of Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
United States
Abstract
For several months, nurses completed ratings of the degree to which certain events relevant to absence were present during each of their scheduled workdays. The event ratings for days when the nurses decided to be absent were then compared with those for days when the nurses attended. As expected, certain events, such as ill health and tiredness, tended to covary and proved to be consistently related to absenteeism across nurses. Also as expected, some events that were not especially relevant for the nurses as a whole, like having a sick family member or friend and concerns about previous poor attendance, nonetheless emerged as being relevant to the absence behavior of certain individuals. Finally, some events were consistently related to the nurses' expressed desire to be absent but not to actual absences. We discuss these differences from two perspectives, one emphasizing the role of attribution bias and the other, a two-stage process in which such bias has no major role.
PubMed ID
10293533 View in PubMed
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Academic performance and job satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244652
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1981 Apr;48(2):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
B W Posthuma
A R Willan
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1981 Apr;48(2):83-6
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Occupational Therapy - psychology
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper investigates the possible relationship between job satisfaction and academic performance of occupational therapists who have graduated from the University of Western Ontario in the years 1975 to 1978. Fifty-four percent of the graduates of this time period filled out questionnaires eliciting information on their satisfaction with their jobs as occupational therapists and with the profession of occupational therapy. This information was analyzed with the therapists' academic performance of Grade XIII and their four years in the Occupational Therapy Program. The results indicated that although job satisfaction related significantly to three individual academic courses it did not relate to overall performance as measured by grade average.
PubMed ID
10250903 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of nurses' estimates of their absenteeism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142102
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Jul;18(5):599-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Alice Gaudine
Connie Gregory
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1B 3V6. agaudine@mun.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Jul;18(5):599-605
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nurse Administrators
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to determine the accuracy of nurses' self-reports of absence by examining: (1) the correlation, intra-class correlation, and Cronbach's alpha for self-reported absence and absence as reported in organizational records, (2) difference in central tendency for the two measures of absence and (3) the percentage of nurses who underestimate their absence.
Research on nurses' absenteeism has often relied on self-reports of absence. However, nurses may not be aware of their actual absenteeism, or they may underestimate it.
Self-reported absence from questionnaires completed by 215 Canadian nurses was compared with their absence from organizational records.
There is a strong positive correlation, a strong intra-class correlation and Cronbach's alpha for the two measures of absence. However, there is a difference in central tendency that is related to the majority of nurses in this study (51.1%) underestimating their days absent from work.
Research examining the predictors of absence may consider measuring absence with self-reports. Nevertheless, nurses demonstrated a bias to underestimate their absence.
Feedback interventions to reduce absenteeism can be developed to include providing nurses with accurate information about their absence.
PubMed ID
20636509 View in PubMed
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Acts of offensive behaviour and risk of long-term sickness absence in the Danish elder-care services: a prospective analysis of register-based outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132870
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):381-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Thomas Clausen
Annie Hogh
Vilhelm Borg
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersoe Parkalle 105, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. tcl@nrcwe.dk
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):381-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Bullying
Denmark
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Behavior
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate associations between acts of offensive behaviour (threats, violence, bullying, and unwanted sexual attention) and risk of long-term sickness absence for eight or more consecutive weeks among female staff in the Danish elder-care services.
These associations were investigated using Cox regression analysis. Data consisted of a merger between Danish survey data collected among 9,520 female employees in the Danish elder-care services and register data on sickness absence compensation.
Compared to unexposed employees, employees frequently exposed to threats (HR = 1.52, 95% CI:1.11-2.07), violence (HR = 1.54, 95% CI:1.06-2.25), and bullying (HR = 2.33, 95% CI:1.55-3.51) had significantly increased risk of long-term sickness absence when adjusting for age, job function, tenure, BMI, smoking status, and psychosocial work conditions. When mutually adjusting for the four types of offensive behaviours, only bullying remained significantly associated with risk of long-term sickness absence (HR = 2.26, 95% CI: 1.50-3.42). No significant associations were found between unwanted sexual attention and risk for long-term sickness absence.
Results indicate that prevention of threats, violence, and bullying may contribute to reduced sickness absence among elder-care staff. The results furthermore suggest that work organizations must be attentive on how to handle and prevent acts of offensive behaviour and support targets of offensive behaviours.
PubMed ID
21769454 View in PubMed
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The acute care nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154071
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(4):100-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Christina Hurlock-Chorostecki
Mary van Soeren
Sharon Goodwin
Author Affiliation
Parkwood Hospital of St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada. tina.hurlock-chorostecki@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(4):100-16
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Role
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Professional Autonomy
Professional Practice Location
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
In spite of the long history of nurse practitioner practice in primary healthcare, less is known about nurse practitioners in hospital-based environments because until very recently, they have not been included in the extended class registration (nurse practitioner equivalent) with the College of Nurses of Ontario. Recent changes in the regulation of nurse practitioners in Ontario to include adult, paediatric and anaesthesia, indicates that a workforce review of practice profiles is needed to fully understand the depth and breadth of the role within hospital settings. Here, we present information obtained through a descriptive, self-reported survey of all nurse practitioners working in acute care settings who are not currently regulated in the extended class in Ontario. Results suggest wide acceptance of the role is concentrated around academic teaching hospitals. Continued barriers exist related to legislation and regulation as well as understanding and support for the multiple aspects of this role beyond clinical practice. This information may be used by nurse practitioners, nursing leaders and other administrators to position the role in hospital settings for greater impact on patient care. As well, understanding the need for regulatory and legislative changes to support the hospital-based Nurse Practitioner role will enable greater impact on health human resources and healthcare transformation.
PubMed ID
19029848 View in PubMed
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[A Danish trial home--both hierarchy and a set routine are absent here].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226842
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 Feb 7;15(3):70-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1991

Adaption of recent Soviet Jewish immigrants and their children to Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230391
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):512-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
T. Barankin
M M Konstantareas
F. de Bosset
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):512-8
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adjustment Disorders - psychology
Adult
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Jews - psychology
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychophysiologic Disorders - psychology
Risk factors
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
This retrospective study examined the prevalence of depression and psychosomatic disorders among Soviet Jewish immigrants, and how such problems might have affected their children's adaptation. A 36-item English and Russian questionnaire was sent to 452 Soviet Jewish immigrants, requesting information on possible problems they or their children had had during the first three years after immigration. Ninety people responded, 78% of whom had children. Immigrants with depression and psychosomatic illness reported greater behaviour, academic, peer interaction, and child-parent difficulties in their children. Those who were married, were proficient in English, were professionals in the USSR and/or Canada and who had supportive friends, were more likely to adapt well. Because of the low response rate, the failure to validate the questionnaire, and the possible overrepresentation of professionals the findings are presented as preliminary pending further exploration. They are discussed for their relevance to the early identification of difficulties in immigrants and their children, and to the need for timely and informed intervention.
PubMed ID
2766204 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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1407 records – page 1 of 141.