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256 records – page 1 of 26.

Acting at a disaster site: views expressed by Swedish nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73369
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
B O Suserud
Author Affiliation
Boras College of Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Education, Nursing - methods - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Job Description
Middle Aged
Nursing Education Research
Patient care team
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
There is a common interest in Swedish society in preparing nurses well for disasters. A special course in the basic nurse education programme is devoted to disaster nursing. The aim of this study is to investigate nursing students' knowledge and views of their own action at the disaster site, both in their professional role and as private persons. The present study is a descriptive one based on the students' written answers. The result shows that the students emphasize contacting the overall disaster officer, surveying the situation and carrying out basic life-saving measures in Sweden known as the ABCs. They also stress the importance of staying calm and, to a lesser extent, seeing to the needs of the mentally shocked. Thus the nursing students seem to regard treatment of physical injuries as most important in the disaster situation.
PubMed ID
8496509 View in PubMed
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The activities and responsibilities of the vice chair for education in U.S. and Canadian departments of medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123194
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erica Brownfield
Benjamin Clyburn
Sally Santen
Gustavo Heudebert
Paul A Hemmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ebrownf@emory.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Canada
Education, Medical
Faculty, Medical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Leadership
Male
Organizational Objectives
Physician Executives
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A profile of the activities and responsibilities of vice chairs for education is notably absent from the medical education literature. The authors sought to determine the demographics, roles and responsibilities, and major priorities and challenges faced by vice chairs for education.
In 2010, the authors sent a confidential, Web-based survey to all 82 identified department of medicine vice chairs for education in the United States and Canada. The authors inquired about demographics, roles, expectations of and for their position, opinions on the responsibilities outlined for their position, metrics used to evaluate their success, top priorities, and job descriptions. Analysis included creating descriptive statistics and categorizing the qualitative comments.
Fifty-nine vice chairs for education (72%) responded. At the time of appointment, only 6 (10%) were given a job description, and only 17 (28%) had a defined job description and metrics used to evaluate their success. Only 20 (33%) had any formal budget management training, and 23 (38%) controlled an education budget. Five themes emerged regarding the responsibilities and goals of the vice chair for education: oversee educational programs; possess educational expertise; promote educational scholarship; serve in leadership activities; and, disturbingly, respondents found expectations to be vague and ill defined.
Vice chairs for education are departmental leaders. The authors' findings and recommendations can serve as a beginning for defining educational directions and resources, building consensus, and designing an appropriate educational infrastructure for departments of medicine.
Notes
Comment In: Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):999-100122827983
PubMed ID
22722351 View in PubMed
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Advanced practice nursing in Canada: has the time really come?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196671
Source
Nurs Stand. 1999 Nov 3-9;14(7):49-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. de Leon-Demaré
K. Chalmers
D. Askin
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Faculty of Nursing, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Nurs Stand. 1999 Nov 3-9;14(7):49-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Forecasting
Humans
Job Description
Needs Assessment
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Abstract
Nurse practitioners in Canada have experienced many of the problems facing those in the UK. In this paper, first presented at this year's meeting of the Commonwealth Nurses' Federation, the authors explain the events.
PubMed ID
11075128 View in PubMed
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Analyzing pacemaker leads: application of a form of energy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196816
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2000 Mar;18(1):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M. Menard
J. Tyndall
Author Affiliation
Surgical Program, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2000 Mar;18(1):30-1
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification - legislation & jurisprudence
Electrocardiography - nursing
Equipment Safety
Humans
Job Description
Nursing Assessment
Ontario
Operating Room Nursing - education - legislation & jurisprudence
Pacemaker, Artificial - standards
Professional Autonomy
Abstract
In the province of Ontario, analyzing of pacemaker leads is a delegated controlled act. This article describes the certification/recertification process for analyzing of pacemaker leads at the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation.
PubMed ID
11051892 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the introduction of a multi-skilled worker into an acute care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209055
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(3):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B. Trerise
L. Lemieux-Charles
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(3):43-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Organizational
Food Service, Hospital
Hospital Restructuring - manpower
Housekeeping, Hospital
Humans
Job Description
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Personnel, Hospital - classification - standards
Psychology, Industrial
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
The first reengineering project undertaken by the Sunnybrook Health Science Centre after adopting a philosophy of patient-focused care was the introduction of a new category of worker: the multi-skilled service assistant. This article describes the experiences of the first two cohorts of service assistants and assesses the changes made to the work itself and the integration of the new workers into the work environment. It concludes by sharing recommendations for introducing a new work role.
PubMed ID
10162424 View in PubMed
Less detail

Angels of the night: evening and night patrols for homebound elders in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71228
Source
Gerontologist. 2003 Oct;43(5):761-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Bo Malmberg
Marie Ernsth
Birgitta Larsson
Steven H Zarit
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Public Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden. bo.malmberg@hhj.hj.se
Source
Gerontologist. 2003 Oct;43(5):761-5
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Care Surveys
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Homebound Persons - rehabilitation
Humans
Job Description
Male
Middle Aged
Night Care
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Sweden
Terminal Care - organization & administration
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the work of evening and night home care patrols in Swedish old-age care by examining how staff members view their work and the specific work content. DESIGN AND METHODS: The authors developed two questionnaires: one that was to be answered jointly by the patrol teams, and one to be completed by each individual member of a team. All patrols in the municipality of Jönköping, Sweden, were asked to participate. RESULTS: The most frequent kind of help provided by evening and night patrols involves personal care, but help with medications and injections are also frequent. The staff reported that it is becoming more common for the patrols to assist people with terminal illnesses. The patrols also increasingly assist people with psychiatric problems. The staff feels that the job may be becoming too diverse and that they need further education for the range of tasks they are asked to perform. IMPLICATIONS: The patrols are very flexible in the services provided. Without the patrols, the staff members believe that many persons would have to leave their homes to go to institutions.
PubMed ID
14570973 View in PubMed
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Are the job demands on physical work capacity equal for young and aging firefighters?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219235
Source
J Occup Med. 1994 Jan;36(1):70-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
S. Lusa
V. Louhevaara
K. Kinnunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Occup Med. 1994 Jan;36(1):70-4
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Finland
Fires - prevention & control
Humans
Job Description
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload
Abstract
The job demands on physical work capacity and the frequency of the firefighting and rescue tasks were rated by 156 professional firefighters (age range, 22 to 54 years) who responded to a questionnaire. Smoke-diving requiring the use of personal protective equipment was considered to demand most aerobic power. The clearing of debris with heavy manual tools, and roof work set the highest demands on muscular performance and motor coordination, respectively. During the past 5 years, 83 to 88% of the respondents had performed these tasks on average four times a year. The rating and frequency of the tasks were not significantly affected by age. The results suggest that the job demands on physical work capacity remain the same throughout the occupational career of the firefighters.
PubMed ID
8138852 View in PubMed
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Bridging the gap: medical directives for acute care nurse practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203613
Source
Can J Nurs Adm. 1998 Sep-Oct;11(3):9-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
V. Vlasic
C. McKay
D. Bisnaire
P. Doyle-Pettypiece
M. Keizer
F. Krawiec
J. Ridley
Source
Can J Nurs Adm. 1998 Sep-Oct;11(3):9-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing
Algorithms
Decision Trees
Humans
Job Description
Nurse Clinicians - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - organization & administration
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Abstract
The following article describes the process by which a group of acute care nurse practitioners sought to address the legal challenges of working beyond the traditional scope of nursing practice. It was necessary to establish mechanisms for communicating a diagnosis, as well as for ordering diagnostic tests, treatments and procedures. Medical directives were viewed as an approach to address components of practice involving controlled acts not authorized to nursing. The process of developing medical directives began with a description of the components of a medical directive. Algorithms were then developed based on the College of Nurses of Ontario's decision tree (Purvis, 1995) for the performance of procedures. These algorithms were broad and applicable across all clinical programs. The final step, required each nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist in collaboration with physician colleagues, to develop individual appendices specific to each clinical program. Health care administrators may find the information provided of assistance in addressing legal concerns that arise when new opportunities for nursing involve movement beyond traditional boundaries.
PubMed ID
9855883 View in PubMed
Less detail

Building community health nursing in the People's Republic of China: a partnership between schools of nursing in Ottawa, Canada, and Tianjin, China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202181
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
N. Edwards
H. Bunn
W C Mei
Z D Hui
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. nedwards@zeus.med.uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
International Educational Exchange
Job Description
Ontario
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
Community health nursing in China is an emerging specialty. A multi-component collaborative endeavor between the Schools of Nursing of Tianjin Medical University, China, and the University of Ottawa, Canada is described. This project, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency, commenced in 1989. It has laid the groundwork for an expanded role for community health nurses in Tianjin, a municipality of 11 million people located in Northeast China. The historical context for the evolution of community health nursing in China and the emergence of community health nursing as a priority area within the project are described. Major project activities are highlighted, illustrating several underlying principles for strengthening the educational preparation of baccalaureate nurses who can apply community health skills. These include creating a critical mass of faculty who can teach community health nursing, modelling classroom and clinical teaching of community health nursing, bridging the gap between nursing in the community and nursing, in the hospital, and developing a prototype for baccalaureate community health nursing experience. Lessons learned from this initiative are summarized.
PubMed ID
10319665 View in PubMed
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Burnout in chairs of academic departments of ophthalmology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160513
Source
Ophthalmology. 2007 Dec;114(12):2350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Oscar A Cruz
Christopher J Pole
Scott M Thomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63104, USA. cruzoa@slu.edu
Source
Ophthalmology. 2007 Dec;114(12):2350-5
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interprofessional Relations
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - organization & administration
Physician Executives
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the incidence of burnout in chairs of academic departments of ophthalmology, identify stressors, and propose methods for reducing and preventing burnout in our academic leaders.
Cross-sectional study.
One-hundred thirty-one chairs of academic departments of ophthalmology in the United States and Canada.
Confidential surveys mailed to ophthalmology chairs.
Questionnaires assessed demographics, potential stressors, satisfaction with personal life, self-efficacy, burnout as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), and quality of life.
Questionnaires were returned from 101 chairs, a response rate of 77%. Each chair had served an average of 9.4 years. They worked an average of 62 hours each week, spending 41% on patient care, 36% on administrative duties, 13% on teaching, and 9% on research. There was no difference in hours worked each week in chairs who had served >10 years from those who had been chair
PubMed ID
17976728 View in PubMed
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256 records – page 1 of 26.