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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Applicant expectations and decision factors for jobs and careers in food-supply veterinary medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158279
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2008;35(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
J Bruce Prince
Kevin Gwinner
David M Andrus
Author Affiliation
Marketing Department, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-0507 USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2008;35(1):14-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Canada
Career Choice
Decision Making
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Job Application
Job Satisfaction
Male
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Students - psychology
United States
Veterinary Medicine - methods
Abstract
This article examines the job expectations of applicants as reported by recruiters interviewing food-supply veterinary medicine (FSVM) candidates and the career-choice decision factors used by year 3 and 4 veterinary students pursuing careers in FSVM. The responses of 1,047 veterinary recruiters and 270 year 3 and 4 students with a food-supply focus from 32 colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada were examined. Recruiters were asked to report the two most important job factors applicants took into account when deciding to accept an offer; students were asked the two most important reasons for choosing a career in FSVM and the two most important benefits of working as a food-supply veterinarian. Recruiters reported that high salaries and good benefits are the two most important decision factors. Interest in the food-animal career area and a desire for a rural, outdoor lifestyle were the top reasons students gave for choosing an FSVM career. Students saw the enjoyment of working with and helping producers and food animals as the most important benefits of a career in FSVM.
PubMed ID
18339950 View in PubMed
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The context of employment discrimination: interpreting the findings of a field experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278815
Source
Br J Sociol. 2015 Mar;66(1):193-214
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Arnfinn H Midtbøen
Source
Br J Sociol. 2015 Mar;66(1):193-214
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Discrimination (Psychology)
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Employment - psychology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Application
Male
Norway
Pakistan - ethnology
Prejudice
Social Perception
Abstract
Although field experiments have documented the contemporary relevance of discrimination in employment, theories developed to explain the dynamics of differential treatment cannot account for differences across organizational and institutional contexts. In this article, I address this shortcoming by presenting the main empirical findings from a multi-method research project, in which a field experiment of ethnic discrimination in the Norwegian labour market was complemented with forty-two in-depth interviews with employers who were observed in the first stage of the study. While the experimental data support earlier findings in documenting that ethnic discrimination indeed takes place, the qualitative material suggests that theorizing in the field experiment literature have been too concerned with individual and intra-psychic explanations. Discriminatory outcomes in employment processes seems to be more dependent on contextual factors such as the number of applications received, whether requirements are specified, and the degree to which recruitment procedures are formalized. I argue that different contexts of employment provide different opportunity structures for discrimination, a finding with important theoretical and methodological implications.
PubMed ID
25339408 View in PubMed
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Discrimination and other barriers to employment for teens and young adults with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139400
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(15-16):1340-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sally Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. slindsay@hollandbloorview.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(15-16):1340-50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Employment, Supported
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Job Application
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Having a disability is a barrier to securing and maintaining employment. Most research has focussed on employment barriers among adults, while very little is known about young people's experience finding paid work.
Young people aged 15-24 were selected from the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to explore the barriers and discrimination they experienced in seeking employment (n?=?1898).
Our findings show that teens and young adults with disabilities encountered several barriers and discrimination in seeking paid employment. The types of barriers that these young people encountered varied by age and type of disability. There were fewer yet different types of barriers to working that were encountered between the two age groups (teens and young adults). Several socio-demographic factors also influenced barriers to working. Severity of disability, type and duration of disability, level of education, gender, low income, geographic location and the number of people living in the household all influenced the kind of barriers and work discrimination for these young people.
Rehabilitation and life skills counsellors need to pay particular attention to age, type of disability and socio-demographic factors of teens and young adults who may need extra help in gaining employment.
PubMed ID
21067349 View in PubMed
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Do terrorist attacks affect ethnic discrimination in the labour market? Evidence from two randomized field experiments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300515
Source
Br J Sociol. 2019 Jan; 70(1):241-260
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Gunn Elisabeth Birkelund
Tak Wing Chan
Elisabeth Ugreninov
Arnfinn H Midtbøen
Jon Rogstad
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo.
Source
Br J Sociol. 2019 Jan; 70(1):241-260
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Emigrants and Immigrants
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Job Application
Male
Norway
Pakistan - ethnology
Personnel Selection
Prejudice - statistics & numerical data
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Social Stigma
Terrorism
Abstract
Terrorist attacks are known to influence public opinion. But do they also change behaviour? We address this question by comparing the results of two identical randomized field experiments on ethnic discrimination in hiring that we conducted in Oslo. The first experiment was conducted before the 2011 terrorist attacks in Norway; the second experiment was conducted after the attacks. In both experiments, applicants with a typical Pakistani name were significantly less likely to get a job interview compared to those with a typical Norwegian name. But the ethnic gap in call-back rates were very similar in the two experiments. Thus, Pakistanis in Norway still experienced the same level of discrimination, despite claims that Norwegians have become more positive about migrants after the far-right, anti-migrant terrorist attacks of 2011.
PubMed ID
29363115 View in PubMed
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Effective group training techniques in job-search training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173545
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2005 Jul;10(3):261-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Jukka Vuori
Richard H Price
Pertti Mutanen
Ira Malmberg-Heimonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jukka.vuori@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2005 Jul;10(3):261-75
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Application
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy, Group
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Unemployment
Vocational Guidance
Abstract
The aim was to examine the effects of group training techniques in job-search training on later reemployment and mental health. The participants were 278 unemployed workers in Finland in 71 job-search training groups. Five group-level dimensions of training were identified. The results of hierarchical linear modeling demonstrated that preparation for setbacks at the group level significantly predicted decreased psychological distress and decreased symptoms of depression at the half-year follow-up. Trainer skills at the group level significantly predicted decreased symptoms of depression and reemployment to stable jobs. Interaction analyses showed that preparation for setbacks at the group level predicted fewer symptoms of psychological distress and depression, and shared perceptions of skilled trainers at the group level predicted fewer symptoms of depression among those who had been at risk for depression.
PubMed ID
16060729 View in PubMed
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Employment interview perceptions of persons with visible disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206624
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1997 Dec;20(4):413-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
L. Arvonio
I. Cull
I. Marini
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitative Services Department, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539-2999, USA.
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1997 Dec;20(4):413-6
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Application
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
PubMed ID
9459108 View in PubMed
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Multiple mini-interview scores of medical school applicants with and without rural attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114845
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013 Apr-Jun;13(2):2362
Publication Type
Article
Author
Malathi Raghavan
Bruce D Martin
Margaret Burnett
Fred Aoki
Heather Christensen
Barbara Mackalski
Deborah G Young
Ira Ripstein
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Malathi.Raghavan@med.umanitoba.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013 Apr-Jun;13(2):2362
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
College Admission Test
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Application
Professional Competence
Rural Health - education
Schools, Medical
Abstract
Students from rural areas are under-represented in medical schools. Concerns have been raised about rural applicants' qualifications relative to those of their urban counterparts, and the impact such potential differences in competitiveness may have on their under-representation. Although studies have reported no differences in Grade Point Average (GPA) and Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores between applicants with and without rural attributes, to date no study has assessed if performance on the multiple mini-interview (MMI) varies between the two groups.
The MMI scores of 1257 interviewees for admission to the MD program at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, in years 2008 to 2011, were studied for an association with graduation from a rural high school and attributes in the following three domains: rural connections, employment in rural areas, and rural community service.
There were 205 (16.3%) rural high school graduates among interviewed applicants. Rural high school graduates scored significantly lower (mean of 4.4 on a scale of 1 to 7; p
PubMed ID
23574402 View in PubMed
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Nova Scotia: late career nurse and new graduate transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126349
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Pat Bellefontaine
Valerie Eden
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Halifax, NS.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:51-60
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Internet
Job Application
Job Satisfaction
Mentors
National health programs - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover
Pilot Projects
Students, Nursing
Workplace - organization & administration
Abstract
Addressing Canada's growing shortage of nurses requires effective strategies for their education, retention and recruitment. Although Nova Scotia produces more than 250 registered nurses and 125 licensed practical nurses each year, some 20% of these graduates leave the province to work elsewhere. The Nova Scotia Research to Action project focused on three retention and recruitment projects: (a) a new-nurse graduate orientation/transition framework, (b) guidelines for nursing mentorship and (c) an online employment tool to assist in the hiring of new nurse graduates. Project partners continue to work collaboratively to advance these provincial initiatives.
PubMed ID
22398478 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.