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141 records – page 1 of 15.

Absence of the A1252G mutation in alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in a North American population suffering from dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209447
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
B M Gilfix
L. Briones
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Genetics, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - complications
Alleles
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Dementia, Vascular - epidemiology - genetics
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin - deficiency - genetics
Abstract
Associations have been reported between polymorphisms in the gene for alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease. An A-to-G substitution at nucleotide position 1,252 of ACT that produces a methionine to valine substitution at codon 389 has been found previously in four of 32 individuals with cerebrovascular disease from a Japanese population. We genotyped 194 individuals [59 controls, 35 with non-AD-type dementia (primarily vascular) and 100 with Alzheimer's-type dementia] for this polymorphism and found none that carry this polymorphism. Therefore, the allelic association of the A1252G mutation of ACT with cerebrovascular disease may be confined to the Japanese population and is not generalizable to other populations.
PubMed ID
9040504 View in PubMed
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Accidental hypothermia and death from cold in urban areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12050
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
M. Tanaka
S. Tokudome
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Fukushima Medical College, Japan.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-6
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypothermia - mortality
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Urban Population
Abstract
Hypothermia is considered a serious problem in big cities. In order to clarify factors contributing to urban hypothermia and death from cold, which will continue to be an issue in cities in the future, we analyzed autopsy reports recorded in the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office from 1974 to 1983. In a total of 18,346 autopsy reports 157 deaths had been diagnosed as due to exposure to cold. Of these cases, the greatest number were males in their forties and fifties, and most of these were inebriated and/or homeless. Eighty-four percent of urban hypothermia cases occurred when the outdoor temperature was below 5 degrees C, and 50% of deaths from cold occurred when the outdoor temperature was between 0 degrees and 5 degrees C. There were no incidences of death from cold when the minimum outdoor temperature had remained above 16 degrees C. Seventy-four percent of deaths from cold occurred during the winter months of December, January and February, and most of the remaining deaths occurred in March and November. There were no deaths from cold from June to August. More than half of all deaths from cold occurred from 3.00 a.m. to 9.00 a.m., with the peak occurring at 5.00 a.m. A blood alcohol concentration of over 2.5 mg/ml had often been found in those in their forties and fifties who had died from hypothermia, and autopsy had often revealed disorders of the liver, digestive system, and circulatory system. Chronic lesions of the liver, probably due to alcoholism, were found in many cases; few cases showed no evidence of alcoholism and these were significantly different from the former group.
PubMed ID
2055665 View in PubMed
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Age patterns of mortality and cause-of-death structures in Sweden, Japan, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68504
Source
Demography. 1994 Nov;31(4):633-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
C L Himes
Author Affiliation
Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, University Park 16802.
Source
Demography. 1994 Nov;31(4):633-50
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disease - classification
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper uses a new standard model of adult mortality to compare the mortality patterns of Swedes, Japanese, and U.S. whites between 1950 and 1985. It examines changes in the age patterns of mortality and the cause-of-death structures within the populations, and the relationships between those two factors. As Japan has reached a level of mortality similar to that in Sweden, the age patterns of mortality in the two populations have become more similar despite distinct differences in causes of death. The United States has a cause-of-death structure similar to that of Sweden, but the age pattern of mortality is very different. High mortality in the middle age range in the United States results in approximately a one-year loss of life expectancy at age 45 in comparison with Sweden.
PubMed ID
7890097 View in PubMed
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Alpha-particle carcinogenesis in Thorotrast patients: epidemiology, dosimetry, pathology, and molecular analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19345
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2001;20(4):311-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Y. Ishikawa
I. Wada
M. Fukumoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, The Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo.
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2001;20(4):311-5
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alpha Particles - adverse effects
Carcinogens - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death
Cholangiocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
DNA Damage
DNA Mutational Analysis
Epidemiologic Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Genes, p53
Half-Life
Hemangiosarcoma - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Loss of Heterozygosity
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Injuries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Thorium Dioxide - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
United States
Abstract
We studied the alpha-radiation risks in patients who received injections of Thorotrast, an X-ray contrast medium used in Europe, Japan, and the United States from 1930 to 1955. Thorotrast was composed of thorium dioxide (ThO2) and Th-232, a naturally occurring radionuclide. Because the physical half-life of ThO2 is 14 billion years and Thorotrast is hardly eliminated from the body, tissues in which it was deposited are irradiated by alpha-radiation for the entire lifetime of the subject. The dosimetry of Thorotrast patients is very complicated, but currently its reliability is quite high compared with other irradiated populations. The major causes of the death of Thorotrast patients are liver cancer, liver cirrhosis, leukemia, and other cancers. Three histologies of liver cancer are found: cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and angiosarcoma. Although cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent, angiosarcoma is characteristic of alpha-radiation. Among blood neoplasms with a higher incidence of increase than the general population, erythroleukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome were remarkable. Thorotrast patients exhaled a high concentration of radon (Rn-220), a progeny of Th-232, but no excesses of lung cancer in the patients of Japan, Germany, and Denmark were reported. Mutation analyses of p53 genes and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies at 17p locus were performed to characterize the genetic changes in Thorotrast-induced liver tumors. Interestingly, LOH, supposedly corresponding to large deletions was not frequent; most mutations were transitions, also seen in tumors of the general population, suggesting that genetic changes of Thorotrast-induced cancers are mainly delayed mutations, and not the result of the direct effects of radiation.
PubMed ID
11797840 View in PubMed
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American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases: The status of acellular pertussis vaccines: current perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37069
Source
Pediatrics. 1991 Aug;88(2):401-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991

[Analysis of the epidemiological data concerning radiation carcinogenic effects and approaches to the low doses' upper limits determination in the aspect of a threshold of the unhealthy influences of ionizing radiation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18426
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2003 Mar-Apr;43(2):227-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
L M Rozhdestvenskii
Author Affiliation
State Research Center-Institute of Biophysics, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow, 123182 Russia. rol@scribph.ru
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2003 Mar-Apr;43(2):227-36
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Cell Nucleus - radiation effects
Cells, Cultured
Chromosome Aberrations
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
English Abstract
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Nuclear Warfare
Occupations
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Radiation, Ionizing
Radioactive fallout
Radiometry
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The analysis of the epidemiological data regarding cancer mortality in cohorts of Japanese A-bomb survivors and Chermobyl liquidators exposed to different doses suggests that there are good reasons for recognizing the threshold of the radiocarcinogenic effect in the region of about 200 Gy (mSv). The analysis of solid cancer mortality in Japanese cohort, which exceeded the expected one in a dose diapason of 5-200 mSv, revealed a (quasi) plateau in a dose-effect curve and led to the conclusion that the nature of the overshoot is non-radiogenic. The analysis of supposedly dose dependent leucosis incidence in the limited low dose diapason in the Chernobyl cohort showed that the real coefficient of the excess absolute or relative radiation risk could not be received in the case because the larger part curve was placed under the control level. In supporting the principle of single hit in a cell nucleus as a base of microdosimetric determination of low radiation doses, the approach to objective delimitation between low, intermediate and high doses regions has been proposed. The low doses upper limit of sparse ionizing radiation for cell nucleus of 8 microns in diameter has been evaluated as 0.65 mGy. It can serve for evaluation of the dose rate threshold regarding the safe chronic radiation levels in the environment.
PubMed ID
12754817 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of food-borne gastroenteritis due to sapovirus among junior high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90995
Source
Jpn J Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;61(6):438-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Usuku Shuzo
Kumazaki Makoto
Kitamura Katsuhiko
Tochikubo Osamu
Noguchi Yuzo
Author Affiliation
Department of Testing and Research, Yokohama City Institute of Health, Kanagawa, Japan. sh00-usuku@city.yokohama.jp
Source
Jpn J Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;61(6):438-41
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Capsid Proteins - genetics
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Faculty
Food Poisoning - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Restaurants
Sapovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Students
Abstract
The human sapovirus (SaV) causes acute gastroenteritis mainly in infants and young children. A food-borne outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with SaV occurred among junior high school students in Yokohama, Japan, during and after a study trip. The nucleotide sequences of the partial capsid gene derived from the students exhibited 98% homology to a SaV genogroup IV strain, Hu/Angelholm/SW278/2004/SE, which was isolated from an adult with gastroenteritis in Solna, Sweden. An identical nucleotide sequence was detected from a food handler at the hotel restaurant, suggesting that the causative agent of the outbreak was transmitted from the food handler. This is the first description of a food-borne outbreak associated with the SaV genogroup IV strain in Japan.
PubMed ID
19050349 View in PubMed
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Association between adverse childhood experiences and adult diseases in older adults: a comparative cross-sectional study in Japan and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309287
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 08 24; 9(8):e024609
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-24-2019
Author
Airi Amemiya
Takeo Fujiwara
Kokoro Shirai
Katsunori Kondo
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Economics and Epidemiology Research, University of Tokyo School of Public Health, Bunkyo-ku, Japan.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 08 24; 9(8):e024609
Date
08-24-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adverse Childhood Experiences - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
We aimed to examine the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and diseases in older adults in Japan and Finland.
Cross-sectional comparative study.
Data from a gerontological study in Japan and two public health studies in Finland were evaluated.
A total of 13?123 adults (mean age, 69.5 years) from Japan and 10?353 adults (mean age, 64.4 years) from Finland were included in this study. Logistic regression was used to examine the association of each of, any of and the cumulative number of ACEs (parental divorce, fear of a family member and poverty in childhood; treated as ordered categorical variables) with poor self-rated health (SRH), cancer, heart disease or stroke, diabetes mellitus, smoking and body mass index. Models were adjusted for sex, age, education, marital status and working status.
Of the respondents, 50% of those in Japan and 37% of those in Finland reported having experienced at least one of the measured ACEs. Number of ACEs was associated with poor SRH in both countries, and the point estimates were similar (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.25 to 1.46 in Japan; OR: 1.34, 95%?CI: 1.27 to 1.41 in Finland). Number of ACEs was associated with the prevalence of cancer, heart disease or stroke, diabetes mellitus, current smoking and an increase in body mass index in both countries.
The association between ACEs and poor SRH, adult diseases and health behaviours was similar among older adults in both Japan and Finland. This international comparative study suggests that the impact of ACEs on health is noteworthy and consistent across cultural and social environments.
PubMed ID
31446402 View in PubMed
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Association between education and television viewing among older working and retired people: a comparative study of Finland and Japan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303182
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 07 25; 18(1):917
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-25-2018
Author
Taishi Tsuji
Airi Amemiya
Kokoro Shirai
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
Jussi Vahtera
Katsunori Kondo
Author Affiliation
Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo Ward, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan. tsuji.t@chiba-u.jp.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 07 25; 18(1):917
Date
07-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Recreation - psychology
Retirement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sedentary Behavior
Smoking
Television - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Educational attainment is associated with physical activity among older people. However, little is known about its association with sedentary lifestyle in European as well as Asian nations. This study aims to examine the associations between educational attainment and daily television viewing as an indicator of a sedentary lifestyle among older working and retired people in Finland and Japan.
We used cross-sectional harmonized data from two cohorts, the Finnish Public Sector study (n?=?10,744) and the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (n?=?2493), evaluating individuals aged 65-75 years old. We defined high-duration television viewing as =4 h per day. Poisson regression was used to examine the association between educational attainment and high-duration television viewing, stratified by the current working status. Models were adjusted for age, sex, household size, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, chronic diseases, mental disorders, and physical activity.
Of the participants, 27% in Finland and 30% in Japan reported high-duration television viewing. Compared with a low education (=9 years), Finnish and Japanese retirees with a high education (=13 years) had less high-duration television viewing [prevalence ratio, PR 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.63-0.73) and 0.66 (0.55-0.79), respectively]. The corresponding PRs for Finnish and Japanese retirees with intermediate education were also lowered [0.89 (0.83-0.95) and 0.79 (0.68-0.91), respectively]. Among older people still at work, educational attainment was associated with high-duration television viewing among the Japanese but not among the Finnish.
A similar association between educational attainment and high-duration television viewing in Finland and Japan particularly after retirement suggests a robust and consistent impact of educational attainment on a sedentary lifestyle after retirements.
PubMed ID
30045698 View in PubMed
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141 records – page 1 of 15.