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(137)Cs distributions in soil and trees in forest ecosystems after the radioactive fallout - Comparison study between southern Finland and Fukushima, Japan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281005
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Sep;161:73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jukka Pumpanen
Mizue Ohashi
Izuki Endo
Pertti Hari
Jaana Bäck
Markku Kulmala
Nobuhito Ohte
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Sep;161:73-81
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Cryptomeria
Finland
Fukushima Nuclear Accident
Japan
Pinus
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Plant Stems - chemistry
Radioactive fallout
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Trees - chemistry
Abstract
The nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima released large amounts of (137)Cs radionuclides into the atmosphere which spread over large forest areas. We compared the (137)Cs concentration distribution in different parts of two coniferous forest ecosystems (needle litter, stems and at different depths in the soil) over short and long term periods in Finland and Japan. We also estimated the change in (137)Cs activity concentrations in needle and soil between 1995 and 2013 in Southern Finland based on the back-calculated (137)Cs activity concentrations. We hypothesized that if the (137)Cs activity concentrations measured in 1995 and 2013 showed a similar decline in concentration, the (137)Cs activity concentration in the ecosystem was already stable in 1995. But if not, the (137)Cs activity concentrations were still changing in 2013. Our results showed that the vertical distribution of the (137)Cs fallout in the soil was similar in Hyytiälä and Fukushima. The highest (137)Cs concentrations were observed in the uppermost surface layers of the soil, and they decreased exponentially deeper in the soil. We also observed that (137)Cs activity concentrations estimated from the samples in 1995 and 2013 in Finland showed different behavior in the surface soil layers compared to the deep soil layer. These results suggested that the (137)Cs nuclei were still mobile in the surface soil layers 27 years after the accident. Our results further indicated that, in the aboveground parts of the trees, the (137)Cs concentrations were much closer to steady-state when compared to those of the surface soil layers based on the estimated declining rates of (137)Cs concentration activity in needles which were similar in 1995 and 2013. Despite its mobility and active role in the metabolism of trees, the (137)Cs remains in the structure of the trees for decades, and there is not much exchange of (137)Cs between the heartwood and surface layers of the stem.
PubMed ID
27158060 View in PubMed
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The 1986 and 1988 UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) reports: findings and implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25247
Source
Health Phys. 1990 Mar;58(3):241-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
F A Mettler
W K Sinclair
L. Anspaugh
C. Edington
J H Harley
R C Ricks
P B Selby
E W Webster
H O Wyckoff
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131.
Source
Health Phys. 1990 Mar;58(3):241-50
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Background Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Japan
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Genetics
Radiation, Ionizing
Risk
Ukraine
Abstract
The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has published a substantive series of reports concerning sources, effects, and risks of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the highlights and conclusions from the most recent 1986 and 1988 reports. The present annual per person effective dose equivalent for the world's population is about 3 mSv. The majority of this (2.4 mSv) comes from natural background, and 0.4 to 1 mSv is from medical exposures. Other sources contribute less than 0.02 mSv annually. The worldwide collective effective dose equivalent annually is between 13 and 16 million person-Sv. The Committee assessed the collective effective dose equivalent to the population of the northern hemisphere from the reactor accident at Chernobyl and concluded that this is about 600,000 person-Sv. The Committee also reviewed risk estimates for radiation carcinogenesis which included the new Japanese dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These data indicate that risk coefficient estimates for high doses and high dose rate low-LET radiation in the Japanese population are approximately 3-10% Sv-1, depending on the projection model utilized. The Committee also indicated that, in calculation of such risks at low doses and low dose rates, a risk-reduction factor in the range of 2-10 may be considered.
PubMed ID
2312289 View in PubMed
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[A bibliographical study on sixteen extant manuscripts of "Tonka Hiketsu" translated by Sadayosi Baba]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77397
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2006 Dec;52(4):561-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Matsuki Akitomo
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2006 Dec;52(4):561-600
Date
Dec-2006
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 19th Century
Humans
Japan
Manuscripts, Medical - history
Russia
Smallpox - history - prevention & control
Translations
Vaccination - history
Abstract
Goroji Nakagawa, a chief keeper of a trading house on Iturup Island, was brought unwillingly to Siberia by Russian vessels in 1807. In 1812, after about five years of hard life in Siberia, he was permitted to return to his homeland with two Russian books on vaccination. Sadayosi Baba, who stayed at Matsumae in 1813, happened to read one of the two books that had been published in 1803 in Peterburg and he translated it into Japanese. Within several months Baba finished his translation, however, he was clearly aware that the translation was far from perfect. Baba revised his draft in 1820 and titled it "Tonka Hiketu" or "The complete method for relieving small pox infection." But it remained unpublished until 1850, when Sen-an Tosimitsu obtained one of the manuscripts at Nagasaki and published it as "Rosia Gyuto Zensho" or "A Synopsis of Russian Vaccination." At present, sixteen manuscripts of "Tonka Hiketu" are extant in Japan and most of them are in public libraries. Bibliographical considerations of their contents, phonogramic descriptions of the original Russian title, comparisons of their illustrations with the originals and differences among Japanese translations reveal to us that the manuscript "Takeda A," among sixteen extant manuscripts, is the closest to the original manuscript of Sadayosi Baba, which remains lost.
PubMed ID
17575850 View in PubMed
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Absence of the A1252G mutation in alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in a North American population suffering from dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209447
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
B M Gilfix
L. Briones
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Genetics, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - complications
Alleles
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Dementia, Vascular - epidemiology - genetics
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin - deficiency - genetics
Abstract
Associations have been reported between polymorphisms in the gene for alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease. An A-to-G substitution at nucleotide position 1,252 of ACT that produces a methionine to valine substitution at codon 389 has been found previously in four of 32 individuals with cerebrovascular disease from a Japanese population. We genotyped 194 individuals [59 controls, 35 with non-AD-type dementia (primarily vascular) and 100 with Alzheimer's-type dementia] for this polymorphism and found none that carry this polymorphism. Therefore, the allelic association of the A1252G mutation of ACT with cerebrovascular disease may be confined to the Japanese population and is not generalizable to other populations.
PubMed ID
9040504 View in PubMed
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[A case of Lyme borreliosis which was suspected to be caused by Borrelia japonica infection in Shizuoka, Japan]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34907
Source
Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 1996 Mar;70(3):264-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T. Masuzawa
Y. Yanagihara
H. Fujita
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Japan.
Source
Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 1996 Mar;70(3):264-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Borrelia - immunology
Borrelia Infections - immunology - microbiology
Child
English Abstract
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Japan
Lyme Disease - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
We report a case of Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease) found in Shizuoka City, Japan which was suspected to be caused by Borrelia japonica infection. A 8-year-old female was bitten on her head by a tick at a camping ground, near Tamagawa, Shizuoka. The tick was removed by the patient and was discarded before species identification. After one week, lymph node swelling with tenderness developed on her left neck. She consulted a local pediatrician and was suspected to have upper respiratory infection. As oral antibiotic, cefaclor was not effective, the patient was referred to us. The patient's serum showed positive reaction with Lyme Borreliosis ELISA kit (Dakopatts, Denmark) using Borrelia burgdorferi flagellum as antigen. The serum also gave positive results with home-made ELISA to B. japonica strain IKA2, which was isolated from I. ovatus, but not with other borrelial strain isolated in the United States, Europe, and from I. persulcatus and wild rodent in Japan. In western blotting, the serum reacted with flagellin and outer surface protein A (OspA) of B. japonica. We diagnosed her as Lyme disease and got a successful result with oral penicillin, sultamicillin. From a result of our field tick survey, we have not collected I. persulcatus around the area where the patient had a tick bite. These findings indicated that Lyme disease was caused by B. japonica infection with I. ovatus bite.
PubMed ID
8621970 View in PubMed
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[Acceptance of van Swieten's liquor in Japan]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9759
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2002 Dec;48(4):575-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Fumi Takahashi
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2002 Dec;48(4):575-95
Date
Dec-2002
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohols - history
Austria
Commerce - history
English Abstract
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Japan
Mercury - history
Prescriptions, Drug - history
Sweden
Syphilis - history
Abstract
Carl Peter Thunberg, a Swedish medical doctor and botanist who visited Japan in 1775 as a medical doctor attached to the Dutch Trade House in Dejima, Nagasaki, taught the treatment of syphilis using mercury water to Japanese doctors and interpreters. This therapy is based on the oral administration of a 0.014% solution of mercuric chloride and was published in 1754 by Gerard van Swieten in Vienna, who questioned the utility of the conventional salivation therapy. The dose was set taking safety into account. Kogyu Yoshio, a Japanese-Dutch interpreter, had already read about it in a book written by J. J. Plenck, when he was taught about the therapy by Thunberg. He recorded Thunberg's teachings in his book "Komohijiki", presenting details of various formulations, including a high-dose formulation. The mercury therapy was subsequently spread across the country by medical doctors who learned Western medicine through the Dutch. In the 1820's, Genshin Udagawa, who read a number of Western medical books, published books on Western drugs. In these books, G. Udagawa included precise information on "Swieten Yakushu-hu (medicated alcohol)", including information on the dosage, formulation, mode of usage, and precautions for use. The maximum dose of mercuric chloride established chloride established by van Swieten was included in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia up to its 5th edition.
PubMed ID
12680425 View in PubMed
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Accidental hypothermia and death from cold in urban areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12050
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
M. Tanaka
S. Tokudome
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Fukushima Medical College, Japan.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-6
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypothermia - mortality
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Urban Population
Abstract
Hypothermia is considered a serious problem in big cities. In order to clarify factors contributing to urban hypothermia and death from cold, which will continue to be an issue in cities in the future, we analyzed autopsy reports recorded in the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office from 1974 to 1983. In a total of 18,346 autopsy reports 157 deaths had been diagnosed as due to exposure to cold. Of these cases, the greatest number were males in their forties and fifties, and most of these were inebriated and/or homeless. Eighty-four percent of urban hypothermia cases occurred when the outdoor temperature was below 5 degrees C, and 50% of deaths from cold occurred when the outdoor temperature was between 0 degrees and 5 degrees C. There were no incidences of death from cold when the minimum outdoor temperature had remained above 16 degrees C. Seventy-four percent of deaths from cold occurred during the winter months of December, January and February, and most of the remaining deaths occurred in March and November. There were no deaths from cold from June to August. More than half of all deaths from cold occurred from 3.00 a.m. to 9.00 a.m., with the peak occurring at 5.00 a.m. A blood alcohol concentration of over 2.5 mg/ml had often been found in those in their forties and fifties who had died from hypothermia, and autopsy had often revealed disorders of the liver, digestive system, and circulatory system. Chronic lesions of the liver, probably due to alcoholism, were found in many cases; few cases showed no evidence of alcoholism and these were significantly different from the former group.
PubMed ID
2055665 View in PubMed
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Adapting ACT to serve culturally diverse communities: a comparison of a Japanese and a Canadian ACT team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132554
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 Aug;62(8):971-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Wendy Chow
Miyuki Shiida
Takashi Shiida
Akiyoshi Hirosue
Samuel Law
Molyn Leszcz
Joel Sadavoy
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Univeristy of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, 260 Spadina Ave., Suite 204, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2E4, Canada. wchow@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 Aug;62(8):971-4
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Japan
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The assertive community treatment (ACT) teams of Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto and the KUINA Center, Hitachinaka, Japan, were compared with regard to ACT fidelity, organizational structure, populations served, and treatment outcomes. Ethnocultural adaptations to the ACT model made by both teams included enhanced family support and intervention, culturally and linguistically matched staff and patients when possible, culturally informed therapy, routine cultural assessments, culturally matched housing and community support, and flexible funding models.
Data were gathered by chart reviews (66 patients in Toronto and 40 patients in Japan), a satisfaction measure, a standard measure of ACT fidelity, and a pre-post measure of treatment outcomes (the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), and hospitalization days.
Both teams achieved good fidelity to ACT and reductions in hospitalization and symptom severity. Family satisfaction scores were high.
With culturally informed adaptations, ACT can be effective in a Canadian mixed ethnocultural population and a homogeneous Japanese population.
PubMed ID
21807841 View in PubMed
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Adapting an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder parent training intervention to different cultural contexts: The experience of implementing the New Forest Parenting Programme in China, Denmark, Hong Kong, Japan, and the United Kingdom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283652
Source
Psych J. 2017 Mar;6(1):83-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Margaret J J Thompson
Alma Au
Cathy Laver-Bradbury
Anne-Mette Lange
Gail Tripp
Shizuka Shimabukuro
Jin S Zhang
Lan Shuai
Catherine E Thompson
David Daley
Edmund J Sonuga-Barke
Source
Psych J. 2017 Mar;6(1):83-97
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - nursing
Child
China
Denmark
Education, Nonprofessional - methods
Hong Kong
Humans
Japan
Parents - education
Program Development
Program Evaluation
United Kingdom
Abstract
The New Forest Parenting Programme (NFPP) is a parenting program developed for parents who have a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is a manualized program that is delivered in a parent's home over 8 weeks, or in a group format, or through a self-help manual. Three randomized controlled trials have been carried out in the United Kingdom. The NFPP group has adapted the program according to feedback from parents and therapists, and for use with different populations, both within the United Kingdom and internationally. The first international trial took place in New York, United States. Trials in Denmark, Hong Kong, and Japan followed. More recently, a trial of the self-help manual has been carried out in mainland China. This paper will outline the adaptions that were needed in order to be able to deliver the program in different countries with their own expectations of parenting, culture, and language. Training had to be differently focused; manuals and handouts had to be revised, translated and back-translated; and supervision had to be delivered at a distance to maintain the fidelity of the program. The international group will outline their experience of running trials in their own countries with the NFPP in a face-to-face format (Denmark), a group format (Hong Kong and Japan), and a self-help format (mainland China).
PubMed ID
28371554 View in PubMed
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[Adult body height in women in Cordoba, Argentina, and exploration of the current trend (1978-198)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33466
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 1999 Jan;5(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
F. Agrelo
L R Pascual
B. Lobo
J. Sabulsky
Author Affiliation
Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Córdoba, Departamento de Maternidad e Infancia, Argentina.
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 1999 Jan;5(1):17-22
Date
Jan-1999
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Argentina
Body Height
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Growth
Humans
Japan
Nutritional Status
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
The objective of this work was to contribute local data concerning the full adult height of women in Cordoba, Argentina, and to explore the possibility of a secular trend in their heights. For the study, 513 women were examined during May and June 1994. All of the women were between 18 and 40 years of age and were mothers of children who were included in a study on lactation, feeding, growth, and development in Córdoba. The measurements were carried out applying standardized techniques and using as a reference standard the 50th-percentile level data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. The mean full height of the Córdoba population studied was 157.9 cm, 0.97 standard deviation (SD) below the reference norm. For the women from the highest of six socioeconomic strata, the mean height was 159.7 cm (-0.67 SD); the mean for women from the lowest stratum was 156.2 cm (-1.25 SD). The difference in the means of those two socioeconomic groups was statistically significant (P
PubMed ID
10050610 View in PubMed
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608 records – page 1 of 61.