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Acute changes in electromechanical parameters during different pacing configurations using a quadripolar left ventricular lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112559
Source
J Interv Card Electrophysiol. 2013 Oct;38(1):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Cinzia Valzania
Maria J Eriksson
Mauro Biffi
Giuseppe Boriani
Fredrik Gadler
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Department, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138, Bologna, Italy, cinzia.valzania@gmail.com.
Source
J Interv Card Electrophysiol. 2013 Oct;38(1):61-9
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Electrodes, Implanted - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Conduction System - physiopathology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Myocardial Contraction
Pacemaker, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Quadripolar left ventricular (LV) leads allow for several pacing configurations in candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Whether different pacing configurations may affect LV dyssynchrony and systolic function is not completely known. We aimed to evaluate the acute effects of different pacing vectors on LV electromechanical parameters in patients implanted with a quadripolar LV lead.
In this two-centre study, within 1 month of implantation 21 CRT patients (65 ± 8 years, 76 % men, 38 % ischemic) receiving a quadripolar LV lead (Quartet 1458Q, St Jude Medical) underwent LV capture threshold assessment, intracardiac electrogram optimization, and two-dimensional echocardiography during four pacing configurations: D1-P4, P4-RV coil, D1-RV coil, and P4-M2. LV dyssynchrony and contractile function were expressed by septal-to-lateral delay and global longitudinal strain (GLS).
LV capture threshold varied between the configurations (P
PubMed ID
23818121 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Adapted Finnish Migraine-Specific Questionnaire for family studies (FMSQ(FS)): a validation study in two languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155582
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Oct;15(10):1071-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
M F Facheris
F D Vogl
S. Hollmann
G. Sixt
C. Pattaro
R. Schönhuber
P P Pramstaller
Author Affiliation
Institute of Genetic Medicine, EURAC Research, Bolzano, Italy.
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Oct;15(10):1071-4
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diagnosis, Differential
Family Health
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Germany - ethnology
Headache - diagnosis
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Questionnaires
Abstract
The hypothesis of a genetic component in the etiology of migraine is getting a foothold. However, to explore genetic associations, precision in clinical phenotypization is crucial. For this reason, migraine-specific questionnaires, well discriminating between primary headaches, are required when large numbers of individuals need to be assessed.
We adapted and translated in two languages, German and Italian, the Finnish Migraine-Specific Questionnaire for use in family studies.
This adaptation proved to be reliable when differentiating from primary headaches, and to be in very good agreement with the standard for comparison. However, discriminating between migraine with and without aura still relays on a specialist evaluation. This article describes the validation of this questionnaire.
PubMed ID
18715259 View in PubMed
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Adapting the Asthma Life Impact Scale (ALIS) for use in Southern European (Italian) and Eastern European (Russian) cultures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131506
Source
J Med Econ. 2011;14(6):729-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
J. Twiss
S P McKenna
S R Crawford
M. Tammaru
N C Oprandi
Author Affiliation
Galen Research Ltd, Manchester, UK. jtwiss@galen-research.com
Source
J Med Econ. 2011;14(6):729-38
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - ethnology - physiopathology - psychology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Function Tests
Russia - epidemiology
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The Asthma Life Impact Scale (ALIS) is a disease-specific measure used to assess the quality-of-life of people with asthma. It was developed in the UK and US and has proven to be acceptable to patients, to have good psychometric properties, and to be unidimensional.
This paper reports on the adaptation and validation of the ALIS for use in representative Southern European (Italian) and Eastern European (Russian) languages.
The ALIS was translated for both cultures using the dual-panel process. The newly translated versions were then tested with asthma patients to ensure face and content validity. Psychometric properties of the new language versions were assessed via a test?re-test postal survey conducted in both countries.
It is possible that some cultural or language differences still exist between the different language versions. Further research should be undertaken to determine responsiveness. Further studies designed to determine the clinical validity of the Italian ALIS would be valuable.
Linguistic nuances were easily resolved during the translation process for both language adaptations. Cognitive debriefing interviews (Russia n=9, male=11.1%, age mean (SD)=55.4 (13.2); Italy n=15, male=66.7%, age mean (SD)=63.5 (11.2)) indicated that the ALIS was easy to read and acceptable to patients. Psychometric testing was conducted on the data (Russia n=61, age mean (SD)=40.7 (15.4); Italy n=71, male=42.6%, age mean (SD)=49.5 (14.1)). The results showed that the new versions of the ALIS were consistent (Russian and Italian Cronbach's alpha=0.92) and reproducible (Russian test-re-test=0.86; Italian test-re-test=0.94). The Italian adaptation showed the expected correlations with the NHP and the Russian adaptation showed strong correlations with the CASIS and CAFS and weak-to-moderate correlations with %FEV1 and %PEF. In both adaptations the ALIS was able to distinguish between participants based on self-reported general health, self-reported severity, and whether or not they were hospitalized in the previous week.
PubMed ID
21899487 View in PubMed
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The AdHOC Study of older adults' adherence to medication in 11 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171755
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Claudia Cooper
Iain Carpenter
Cornelius Katona
Marianne Schroll
Cordula Wagner
Daniela Fialova
Gill Livingston
Author Affiliation
Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Dept. of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, Archway Campus, Holborn Union Building, Highgate Hill, London N19 5NL, UK.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Demography
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Authors investigated, cross-nationally, the factors, including demographic, psychiatric (including cognitive), physical, and behavioral, determining whether older people take their prescribed medication. Older adults are prescribed more medication than any other group, and poor adherence is a common reason for non-response to medication.
Researchers interviewed 3,881 people over age 65 who receive home care services in 11 countries, administering a structured interview in participants' homes. The main outcome measure was the percentage of participants not adherent to medication.
In all, 12.5% of people (N=456) reported that they were not fully adherent to medication. Non-adherence was predicted by problem drinking (OR=3.6), not having a doctor review their medication (OR=3.3), greater cognitive impairment (OR=1.4 for every one-point increase in impairment), good physical health (OR=1.2), resisting care (OR=2.1), being unmarried (OR=2.3), and living in the Czech Republic (OR=4.7) or Germany (OR=1.4).
People who screen positive for problem drinking and who have dementia (often undiagnosed) are less likely to adhere to medication. Therefore, doctors should consider dementia and problem drinking when prescribing for older adults. Interventions to improve adherence in older adults might be more effective if targeted at these groups. It is possible that medication-review enhances adherence by improving the doctor-patient relationship or by emphasizing the need for medications.
PubMed ID
16319299 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and cancer of the upper digestive tract. Pattern of risk in Italy is different from that in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10677
Source
BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1289-90; author reply 1291
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1999

All cause mortality and its determinants in middle aged men in Finland, The Netherlands, and Italy in a 25 year follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226215
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1991 Jun;45(2):125-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
A. Menotti
A. Keys
D. Kromhout
A. Nissinen
H. Blackburn
F. Fidanza
S. Giampaoli
M. Karvonen
J. Pekkanen
S. Punsar
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Viale Regina Elena, Rome, Italy.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1991 Jun;45(2):125-30
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Netherlands - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The aims were (1) to compare all cause mortality in population samples of different cultures; and (2) to cross predict fatal event by risk functions involving risk factors usually measured in cardiovascular epidemiology.
The study was a 25 year prospective cohort study. The prediction of all cause mortality was made using the multiple logistic equation as a function of 12 risk factors; the prediction of months lived after entry examination was made by the multiple linear regression using the same factors. POPULATION SAMPLES: There were five cohorts of men aged 40-59 years, from Finland (two cohorts, 1677 men), from The Netherlands (one cohort, 878 men), and from Italy (two cohorts, 1712 men).
The Finnish cohorts came from geographically defined rural areas, the Dutch cohort from a small town in central Holland, and the Italian cohorts from rural villages in northern and central Italy.
All cause mortality was highest in Finland (557 per 1000), and lower in The Netherlands (477) and in Italy (475). The solutions of the multiple logistic function showed the significant and almost universal predictive role of certain factors, with rare exceptions. These were age, blood pressure, cigarette smoking, and arm circumference (the latter with a negative relationship). Similar results were obtained when solving a multiple linear regression equation predicting the number of months lived after entry examination as a function of the same factors. The prediction of fatal events in each country, using the risk functions of the others, produced limited errors, the smallest one being -2% and the largest +11%. When solving the logistic model in the pool of all the cohorts with the addition of dummy variables for the identification of nationality, it also appeared that only a small part of the mortality differences between countries is not explained by 12 available risk factors.
A small set of risk factors seems to explain the intercohort differences of 25 year all cause mortality in population samples of three rather different cultures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2072071 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282438
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Pedersen
Zorana J Andersen
Massimo Stafoggia
Gudrun Weinmayr
Claudia Galassi
Mette Sørensen
Kirsten T Eriksen
Anne Tjønneland
Steffen Loft
Andrea Jaensch
Gabriele Nagel
Hans Concin
Ming-Yi Tsai
Sara Grioni
Alessandro Marcon
Vittorio Krogh
Fulvio Ricceri
Carlotta Sacerdote
Andrea Ranzi
Ranjeet Sokhi
Roel Vermeulen
Kees de Hoogh
Meng Wang
Rob Beelen
Paolo Vineis
Bert Brunekreef
Gerard Hoek
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Italy - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence.
We obtained data from four cohorts with enrolment during 1985-2005 in Denmark, Austria and Italy. Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOX), particulate matter (PM) with diameter of less than 10µm (PM10), less than 2.5µm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10µm (PM2.5-10) and PM2.5 absorbance (soot) at baseline home addresses were estimated using land-use regression models from the ESCAPE project. We also investigated traffic density on the nearest road. We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Out of 174,770 included participants, 279 liver cancer cases were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 17 years. In each cohort, HRs above one were observed for all exposures with exception of PM2.5 absorbance and traffic density. In the meta-analysis, all exposures were associated with elevated HRs, but none of the associations reached statistical significance. The summary HR associated with a 10-µg/m(3) increase in NO2 was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.30) and 1.34 (95% CI: 0.76, 2.35) for a 5-µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5.
The results provide suggestive evidence that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer. Confidence intervals for associations with NO2 and NOX were narrower than for the other exposures.
PubMed ID
28107740 View in PubMed
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Anaesthesiological manpower in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211565
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 1996 Jul;13(4):325-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
G. Rolly
W R MacRae
W P Blunnie
M. Dupont
P. Scherpereel
Author Affiliation
University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesiology, Gent, Belgium.
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 1996 Jul;13(4):325-32
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anesthesiology - education - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Europe - epidemiology
European Union - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nurse Anesthetists - statistics & numerical data
Physician Assistants - statistics & numerical data
Population
Sex Distribution
Switzerland - epidemiology
Abstract
Information about physician anaesthesiologist manpower in the countries of the European Union was collected from questionnaires sent to the delegates representing their respective countries on the European Board of Anaesthesiology. In the countries of the European Union and Switzerland and Norway 40,259 specialist anaesthesiologists are recorded. The number of anaesthesiologists in relation to population varies between as little as 4.4 and 4.6 (Ireland and UK) and as many as 15.6 (Italy), with a mean of 10.8/100,000 inhabitants. There are 11,610 physicians recorded in training in anaesthesiology. The ratio of trainees to specialists in the European Union countries was 28.8/100, varying from as low as 6.5 in France, to as high as 96.7 and 98/100 in Ireland and the UK respectively. These figures indicate a wide difference in the numbers of specialists and trainees between the European countries studied. However, the overall mean figure is close to that reported in the USA (9.2/100,000).
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Anaesthesiol. 1996 Jul;13(4):314-58842649
Comment In: Eur J Anaesthesiol. 1997 Jul;14(4):4779253582
PubMed ID
8842651 View in PubMed
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273 records – page 1 of 28.