Skip header and navigation

Refine By

409 records – page 1 of 41.

1H MRS studies in the Finnish boron neutron capture therapy project: detection of 10B-carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172386
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
M. Timonen
L. Kankaanranta
N. Lundbom
J. Collan
A. Kangasmäki
M. Kortesniemi
A-M Häkkinen
A. Lönngren
S. Karjalainen
M. Rasilainen
J. Leinonen
T. Huitti
J. Jääskeläinen
M. Kouri
S. Savolainen
S. Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Boron - therapeutic use
Boron Compounds - analysis - blood
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy
Brain Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Carcinoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Female
Finland
Fructose - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Glioblastoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Humans
Hydrogen
Isotopes - therapeutic use
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radiotherapy
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Phantoms, Imaging
Plasma
Radiopharmaceuticals - therapeutic use
Abstract
This article summarizes the current status of 1H MRS in detecting and quantifying a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) boron carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) in vivo in the Finnish BNCT project. The applicability of 1H MRS to detect BPA-F is evaluated and discussed in a typical situation with a blood containing resection cavity within the gross tumour volume (GTV). 1H MRS is not an ideal method to study BPA concentration in GTV with blood in recent resection cavity. For an optimal identification of BPA signals in the in vivo 1H MR spectrum, both pre- and post-infusion 1H MRS should be performed. The post-infusion spectroscopy studies should be scheduled either prior to or, less optimally, immediately after the BNCT. The pre-BNCT MRS is necessary in order to utilise the MRS results in the actual dose planning.
PubMed ID
16233888 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 7-day activity diary for assessment of daily energy expenditure validated by the doubly labelled water method in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52682
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Sep;51(9):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
L E Bratteby
B. Sandhagen
H. Fan
G. Samuelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Sep;51(9):585-91
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Basal Metabolism
Calorimetry, Indirect
Comparative Study
Deuterium - diagnostic use
Energy Metabolism
Exertion
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen Isotopes
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Water
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To validate the use of an activity diary and predicted BMR for assessment of daily total energy expenditure (TEE) and physical activity level (PAL = TEE/BMR) in adolescents. DESIGN: TEE and PAL estimated from activity diary records kept for seven days and BMR predicted from age, gender and body weight were compared with the results of doubly labelled water (DLW) measurements and indirect calorimetry performed during the same time period. SETTING: The Unit of paediatric Physiology of the Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Fifty randomly selected 15 y old adolescents (25 boys and 25 girls). RESULTS: The mean difference between TEE estimated in all adolescents by the activity diary and by DLW methods was 1.2%. The limits of agreement (mean difference 2 s.d.) were -3.47 and 3.77 MD/d, equivalent to a coefficient of variation of 15%. The mean difference between PAL assessed by activity diary records and by DLW measurements was 0.001, and the limits of agreement between the two methods were 0.54. CONCLUSIONS: The results imply that the activity diary method provides a close estimate of TEE and PAL in population groups.
PubMed ID
9306084 View in PubMed
Less detail

13C evidence for dietary habits of prehistoric man in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62404
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-1981
Author
H. Tauber
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Date
Jul-23-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - analysis
Carbon Isotopes
Collagen - analysis
Denmark
Diet
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
PubMed ID
7019718 View in PubMed
Less detail

[13-year period of application of the 13C-urease breath test for determining Helicobacter pylori in Russian clinical practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262452
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(11):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
S I Rapoport
N A Shubina
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(11):59-64
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breath Tests - instrumentation - methods
Carbon Isotopes - diagnostic use
Child
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Family Health
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Helicobacter Infections - complications - diagnosis - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - physiology
Humans
Male
Medication Therapy Management
Predictive value of tests
Russia
Spectrum Analysis - methods
Abstract
13C-urease breath tests have been extensively used in world-wide gastroenterological practice since the 1990s. We have been using them since 2000, but their clinical application in Russia is far from being universal. Moreover, their results are significantly different from those obtained by other methods for determining H. pylori. The authors report original data on the peculiarities of occurrence of this pathogen in its carriers.
PubMed ID
25796949 View in PubMed
Less detail

15N in symbiotic fungi and plants estimates nitrogen and carbon flux rates in Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82286
Source
Ecology. 2006 Apr;87(4):816-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Hobbie John E
Hobbie Erik A
Author Affiliation
The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. jhobbie@mbl.edu
Source
Ecology. 2006 Apr;87(4):816-22
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Carbon - metabolism
Fungi - metabolism
Nitrogen Isotopes - metabolism
Plants - metabolism
Abstract
When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae): hyphae take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and receive plant sugars in return. In ecosystems, the transfers within the pathway fractionate nitrogen isotopes so that the natural abundance of 15N in fungi differs from that in their host plants by as much as 12% per hundred. Here we present a new method to quantify carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the symbiosis based on the fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from fungi to plant roots. We tested this method, which is based on the mass balance of 15N, with data from arctic Alaska where the nitrogen cycle is well studied. Mycorrhizal fungi provided 61-86% of the nitrogen in plants; plants provided 8-17% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration. This method of analysis avoids the disturbance of the soil-microbe-root relationship caused by collecting samples, mixing the soil, or changing substrate concentrations. This analytical technique also can be applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems, such as many temperate and boreal forests, to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of nutrient transfers mediated by mycorrhizae at the plant-soil interface.
PubMed ID
16676524 View in PubMed
Less detail

32P-post-labelling of 7-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)guanine in white blood cells of workers occupationally exposed to epichlorohydrin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67496
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2000 Feb;21(2):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
K. Plna
S. Osterman-Golkar
E. Nogradi
D. Segerbäck
Author Affiliation
Center for Nutrition and Toxicology, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, S-141 57 Huddinge and Department of Molecular Genome Research, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. kamila.plna2cnt.ki.se
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2000 Feb;21(2):275-80
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkylating Agents - adverse effects - pharmacology
Biological Markers
Chemical Industry
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Chromatography, Ion Exchange
Comparative Study
DNA Adducts - analysis
DNA Damage
Epichlorohydrin - adverse effects - pharmacology
Guanine - analogs & derivatives - blood
Humans
Isotope Labeling
Leukocytes - chemistry - drug effects
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Phosphorus Radioisotopes
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking - epidemiology
Solvents - adverse effects - pharmacology
Sweden
Abstract
Epichlorohydrin (ECH) is a simple 3-carbon epoxide of industrial importance. It has been shown to be genotoxic in several systems and carcinogenic in experimental animals. The aim of the present investigation was to study DNA adducts of ECH as a biomarker of occupational exposure to this chemical. 7-(3-Chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-CHP-guanine) was analysed in DNA from white blood cells using an anion exchange-based adduct enrichment protocol of the (32)P-post-labelling/HPLC-based assay. Blood samples were collected from seven workers handling ECH (exposed), nine workers not handling ECH but normally present in the premises where this chemical is used (potentially exposed) and 13 office and factory workers from locations in the plant where ECH is not handled (controls). 7-CHP-guanine was detected in five of the seven workers exposed to ECH (1.6-7.1 mol/10(9) mol nucleotides) and in two of the nine workers potentially exposed to ECH (0.8-1.5 mol/10(9) mol nucleotides). This adduct was not detected in any of the 13 controls. The difference in adduct levels between exposed workers and controls was statistically significant (Mann-Whitney test, P
PubMed ID
10657968 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 90 Sr content of human bone and 137 Cs content of human muscle in Finland 1963-1965.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112088
Source
Acta Radiol Diagn (Stockh). 1966;:Suppl 254:64-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

The 90 Sr content of human bone and 137 Cs content of human muscle in Finland 1963-1965.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102616
Source
Acta Radiol Diagn (Stockh). 1966:Suppl 254:64-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

409 records – page 1 of 41.