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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Acute fatigue impairs neuromuscular activity of anterior cruciate ligament-agonist muscles in female team handball players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143314
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2011 Dec;21(6):833-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M K Zebis
J. Bencke
L L Andersen
T. Alkjaer
C. Suetta
P. Mortensen
M. Kjaer
P. Aagaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mettezebis@hotmail.com
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2011 Dec;21(6):833-40
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - innervation
Athletic Injuries - etiology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Denmark
Electromyography
Female
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Movement - physiology
Muscle Fatigue - physiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
In sports, like team handball, fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. While effects of fatigue on muscle function are commonly assessed during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), such measurements may not relate to the muscle function during match play. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle fatigue induced by a simulated handball match on neuromuscular strategy during a functional sidecutting movement, associated with the incidence of ACL injury. Fourteen female team handball players were tested for neuromuscular activity [electromyography (EMG)] during a sidecutting maneuver on a force plate, pre and post a simulated handball match. MVC was obtained during maximal isometric quadriceps and hamstring contraction. The simulated handball match consisted of exercises mimicking handball match activity. Whereas the simulated handball match induced a decrease in MVC strength for both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles (P
PubMed ID
20500560 View in PubMed
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Association of neck pain, disability and neck pain during maximal effort with neck muscle strength and range of movement in women with chronic non-specific neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178716
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jari Ylinen
Esa-Pekka Takala
Hannu Kautiainen
Matti Nykänen
Arja Häkkinen
Timo Pohjolainen
Sirkka-Liisa Karppi
Olavi Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Jyväskylä Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, 40620 Jyväskylä, Finland. jari.ylinen@ksshp.fi
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chronic Disease
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Head Movements - physiology
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle Weakness - etiology - physiopathology
Neck Muscles - physiopathology
Neck Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases
Pain Threshold - physiology
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Stress, mechanical
Torque
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
Several studies have reported lower neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the severity of neck pain and disability with neck strength and range of movement in women suffering from chronic neck pain. One hundred and seventy-nine female office workers with chronic neck pain were selected to the study. The outcome was assessed by the self-rating questionnaires on neck pain (visual analogue scale, Vernon's disability index, Neck pain and disability index) and by measures of the passive range of movement (ROM) and maximal isometric neck muscle strength. No statistically significant correlation was found between perceived neck pain and the disability indices and the maximal isometric neck strength and ROM measures. However, the pain values reported during the strength tests were inversely correlated with the results of strength tests (r=-0.24 to -0.46), showing that pain was associated with decreased force production. About two-thirds of the patients felt pain during test efforts. Pain may prevent full effort during strength tests and hence the production of maximal force. Thus in patients with chronic neck pain the results do not always describe true maximal strength, but rather the patients' ability to bear strain, which may be considerably influenced by their painful condition. The results of the present study suggest that rehabilitation in cases of chronic neck pain should aim at raising tolerance to mechanical strain.
PubMed ID
15324778 View in PubMed
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Associations between functional capacity and work ability among elderly municipal employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227565
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991;17 Suppl 1:122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C H Nygård
L. Eskelinen
S. Suvanto
K. Tuomi
J. Ilmarinen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991;17 Suppl 1:122-7
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Test
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Local Government
Male
Mental Processes - physiology
Middle Aged
Oxygen - blood
Physical Exertion - physiology
Psychometrics
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Wechsler Scales - statistics & numerical data
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
The relationship between objectively measured physical and mental functional capacity and work ability was studied among 137 workers with a mean age of 55 years. Of the physical capacity tests muscular strength correlated the best with the constructed work ability index. Cardiorespiratory capacity and work ability did not correlate statistically significantly. About 50% of the subjects was classified uniformly, and less than 10% not uniformly, with respect to muscular strength. The correlation between cardiorespiratory capacity and work ability was significant for those without, but not for those with, a musculoskeletal disease. The mental capacity tests had systematically lower correlations with work ability than the tests for physical capacity. The highest statistically significant correlation was found between visuomotor speed and work ability. Objective measurements of muscular strength seem useful for defining work ability, but other tests need to be improved to be more work-related. Furthermore, musculoskeletal diseases should be checked for when cardiorespiratory capacity is assessed.
PubMed ID
1792525 View in PubMed
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Associations of Quadriceps Torque Properties with Muscle Size, Attenuation, and Intramuscular Adipose Tissue in Older Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303046
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2018 06 14; 73(7):931-938
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-14-2018
Author
Andrew W Frank-Wilson
Didier Chalhoub
Pedro Figueiredo
Pálmi V Jónsson
Kristín Siggeirsdóttir
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Vilmundur Guðnason
Lenore Launer
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Science, National Institute on Aging (NIA), Bethesda, Maryland.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2018 06 14; 73(7):931-938
Date
06-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - pathology - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Quadriceps Muscle - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Torque
Abstract
Atrophy and fatty infiltration of muscle with aging are associated with fractures and falls, however, their direct associations with muscle function are not well described. It was hypothesized that participants with lower quadriceps muscle attenuation, area, and greater intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) will exhibit slower rates of torque development (RTD) and lower peak knee extension torques.
Data from 4,842 participants (2,041 men, 2,801 women) from the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (mean age 76 ± 0.1 years) with complete thigh computed tomography and isometric knee testing. Regression models were adjusted for health, behavior, and comorbidities. Muscle attenuation was further adjusted for muscle area and IMAT; muscle area adjusted for IMAT and attenuation; and IMAT adjusted for muscle area and attenuation. Standardized betas (ß) indicate association effect sizes.
In the fully-adjusted models, attenuation (men ß = 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.11; women ß = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.11) and muscle area (men ß = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.19; women ß = 0.10, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.15) were associated with knee RTD. Attenuation (men ß = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.16; women ß = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.09, 0.16) and muscle area (men ß = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.33, 0.43; women ß = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.37) were associated with peak torque.
These data suggest that muscle attenuation and area are independently associated with RTD and peak torque; and that area and attenuation demonstrate similar contributions to RTD.
PubMed ID
29342246 View in PubMed
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Differences in muscle strength in dominant and non-dominant leg in females aged 20-39 years--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135247
Source
Phys Ther Sport. 2011 May;12(2):76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Katharina Lanshammar
Eva L Ribom
Author Affiliation
Physiotherapy Ward, University Hospital, Entrance 85, s-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Phys Ther Sport. 2011 May;12(2):76-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Bone Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dominance, Cerebral
Female
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Leg - physiology
Motor Activity
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Torque
Abstract
In sports medicine, muscle strength and joint flexibility of the contralateral limb is used as a rehabilitation goal for the injured extremity. The present study was designed to determine whether side differences in hamstrings and quadriceps muscle strength, or in the ratio between hamstrings and quadriceps strength (H:Q), might be of clinical importance.
Cross-sectional study in a randomly selected, population-based cohort.
University hospital in Uppsala. Quadriceps and hamstrings strength was assessed by maximum isokinetic concentric contractions at an angular velocity of 90°/s.
A sample of 159 randomly selected women from Uppsala county population registers, aged 20-39 years, was included in the study.
Peak isokinetic concentric torques of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and the corresponding H:Q ratios.
In this cohort of non-athletes the muscle strength in the dominant leg was on average 8.6% (p 0.001) in the non-dominant leg.
Our study shows that in a population-based sample of women there is a significant asymmetry in leg muscle strength favouring non-dominant leg flexion and dominant leg extension. In this study the H:Q ratio was therefore substantially lower in the dominant leg. Whether this should influence rehabilitation goals must be further investigated.
PubMed ID
21496769 View in PubMed
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Effect of body composition on the neuromuscular function of Finnish conscripts during an 8-week basic training period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154459
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Nov;22(6):1916-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Jarmo M Piirainen
Jukka A Salmi
Janne Avela
Vesa Linnamo
Author Affiliation
Neuromuscular Research Center, Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. jarmo.piirainen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Nov;22(6):1916-25
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Electromyography
Finland
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Linear Models
Male
Military Personnel
Physical Education and Training
Physical Fitness
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Resistance Training
Abstract
The dropout rate in the Finnish military service has increased during the past two decades. At the same time, the physical fitness level of young Finnish males has decreased, possibly leading to overtraining in new conscripts. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether body composition would influence neuromuscular function during the 8-week basic training (BT) period. Eighteen healthy male subjects (19 +/- 1 years) were divided into three different groups according to their body fat %. Group 1 (13%). The soleus H-reflex response was measured in the standing position. In the seated position (knee 160 degrees and hip 110 degrees), the V-wave response was measured during maximal voluntary contraction, and the single twitch response was measured in passive conditions. In body composition (fat-free mass and fat mass) was observed small but not significant changes during 8-week period. H-reflex activity increased in groups 2 (10.9% not significant [ns]) and 3 (2.8% ns) but decreased in group 1 (-34.8%, p
PubMed ID
18978617 View in PubMed
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Effect of chronic alcohol intake on energy metabolism in human muscle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5311
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1996 Dec;20(9 Suppl):360A-362A
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
K. Yazaki
M. Haida
D. Kurita
Y. Shinohara
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1996 Dec;20(9 Suppl):360A-362A
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - physiopathology
Cerebellar Ataxia - physiopathology
Diplopia - physiopathology
Dysarthria - physiopathology
Energy Metabolism - drug effects - physiology
Ethanol - adverse effects
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - drug effects - physiopathology
Neurologic Examination
Phosphates - metabolism
Abstract
We investigated the effect of alcohol on muscle energy metabolism by using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 12 chronic alcoholics [6 with neurological signs and symptoms (such as cerebellar ataxia or diplopia) and 6 without neurological signs or symptoms], compared with five healthy subjects who also received acute alcohol loading. Intracellular pH and phosphocreatine (PCr) index [PCr/ (PCr + Pi)] were measured during rest, exercise, and recovery in the left flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. In healthy subjects, acute alcohol loading did not influence the changes of muscle pH and PCr index. Alcoholics with neurological signs showed marked decreases in muscle intracellular pH and PCr index during exercise and a marked delay of pH recovery after exercise. There was no delay of PCr index recovery. Alcoholics without neurological signs showed slight decreases in intracellular pH and PCr index, but rapid recovery of both intracellular pH and PCr index was observed. Marked decrease and delayed recovery in pH, but rapid recovery of PCr index, indicate that the muscle of patients with neurological signs produced lactate during and after exercise to maintain the ATP level, which implies that anaerobic metabolism is favored over aerobic metabolism in these patients.
PubMed ID
8986238 View in PubMed
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Effect of isometric upper-extremity exercises on the activation of core stabilizing muscles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93571
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Mar;89(3):513-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Tarnanen Sami P
Ylinen Jari J
Siekkinen Kirsti M
Mälkiä Esko A
Kautiainen Hannu J
Häkkinen Arja H
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. sami.tarnanen@kolumbus.fi
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Mar;89(3):513-21
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - physiology
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electromyography
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Postural Balance - physiology
Posture
Probability
Reference Values
Rehabilitation Centers
Sensitivity and specificity
Upper Extremity
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether isometric exercises for the upper extremities could sufficiently activate core stabilizing muscles to increase muscle strength. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at a Finnish hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Healthy adult women (N=20). INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Peak isometric strength of the back and abdominal muscles was measured and relative loading in 5 test exercises was evaluated by surface electromyography. RESULTS: The rectus abdominis and obliquus externus abdominis were activated to the greatest degree in a bilateral shoulder extension exercise and the average surface electromyographic activity was 114% and 101% compared with the amplitude elicited during the maximal isometric trunk flexion exercise. Horizontal shoulder extension elicited the greatest activation of the longissimus and multifidus muscles. In this exercise, the activity levels of the left side multifidus and longissimus muscles were 84% and 69%, respectively, compared with the level of activity elicited during trunk extension. CONCLUSIONS: Of all the exercises studied, bilaterally performed isometric shoulder extension and unilaterally performed horizontal shoulder extension elicited the greatest levels of activation of the trunk musculature. Thus, it can be assumed that these exercises elicit sufficient levels of contraction of the trunk muscles for the development of their endurance and strength characteristics in rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
18295631 View in PubMed
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Effects of home exercises and group training on functional abilities in home-dwelling older persons with mobility and balance problems. A randomized study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49672
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Apr;16(2):113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Jorunn L Helbostad
Olav Sletvold
Rolf Moe-Nilssen
Author Affiliation
Section of Physiotherapy Science, Institute of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. jorunn.helbostad@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Apr;16(2):113-21
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Movement Techniques - methods
Female
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Leg - physiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Movement - physiology
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium - physiology
Norway
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Posture - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Walkers
Walking - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Exercise in older people may reduce falls and improve functional abilities. Less is known about the optimal amount of training. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of home training, and whether group training in addition to home training enhances the effect. METHODS: This randomized trial included 77 persons aged 75 years and older (mean 81, SD 4.5), living at home. Home training (HT) comprised twice-daily functional balance and strength exercises and 3 group meetings. Combined training (CT) included group training twice weekly and the same home exercises. The trial lasted 12 weeks. Physical therapists ran both programs. Exercises and falls were recorded daily. We assessed function at baseline, 3 and 9 months, and falls at one year. RESULTS: Mean participation for group meetings was 2.5 out of 3 (HT group) and, for group training sessions, 21 out of 24 (CT group). The mean numbers of daily home sessions were 1.29 and 1.35 in the HT and CT groups. Overall improvement, but no group differences, were found at 3 months for walking speed, Figure of Eight, Timed Up & Go, Maximum Step Length, Timed Pick-up and Sit-to-stand (p
PubMed ID
15195985 View in PubMed
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Effects of training on functional performance in 65, 75 and 85 year-old women: experiences deriving from community based studies in Odense, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49769
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2003 Feb;13(1):70-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
L. Puggaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark. Lpuggard@health.sdu.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2003 Feb;13(1):70-6
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Education and Training
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aim of the Odense training studies is to elucidate if regular physical training influences the expected decline in physical functional ability in order to assess capacity for postponing dependence in old age. All participants were healthy community-dwelling women representing three different age-cohorts of 65, 75 and 85 year-old subjects. The 65 and 85 year-old participants of the training group took part in physical class-based exercises for eight months with one session of 60 min a week, whereas the 75 year-old women trained twice a week over eight months. The multicomponent training consisted of various exercises typically involving body awareness, rhythm, aerobic performance (walking), muscle strength and muscle endurance, flexibility, reaction and balance exercises. Physical ability was measured as physical performance test (PPT), isometric muscle strength of the trunk, hip and leg, aerobic capacity and walking speed. This shows that regular training can significantly improve physical ability of elderly women with regard to PPT, maximal oxygen uptake and maximal walking speed, suggesting that both young-old and old-old women are able to benefit from regular tailored exercise training. Thus, physical training of old community-dwelling women appears to represent a prophylactic remedy that merits further research aimed at evaluating the preliminary findings of the present studies in larger, less selective groups of participants.
PubMed ID
12535320 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.