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Food consumption and the risk of type 1 diabetes in children and youth: a population-based, case-control study in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154867
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2008 Jun;27(3):414-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Victoria S Benson
John A Vanleeuwen
Jennifer Taylor
Patricia A McKinney
Linda Van Til
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, England, United Kingdom. vicky.benson@ceu.ox.ac.uk
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2008 Jun;27(3):414-20
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Drinking
Eggs
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Male
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine if the consumption of certain foods during the year prior to diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) was associated with the risk of developing T1D in children and youth residing in Prince Edward Island, Canada.
Cases (n = 57) consisted of newly diagnosed patients with T1D during 2001 to 2004. Controls (n = 105) were randomly selected from the province's population, and matched to cases by age at diagnosis and sex. Food consumption in cases and controls was assessed using two previously validated food frequency questionnaires, and a survey was developed to collect information on potential environmental and genetic risk factors.
The median age at diagnosis was nine years, and 67% of cases were male. After controlling for the matched variables and four significant environmental and genetic risk factors (family members with T1D, the number of infections during the first two years of life, place of residence, and father's education) in the final logistic regression model, the consumption of regular soft drinks (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.21, 6.36) and eggs (OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.09, 5.75) were significant risk factors of T1D, when consumed once per week or more often.
Diet may play a role in the development of T1D. However, further research is needed to confirm these observed associations.
PubMed ID
18838530 View in PubMed
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Type 1 diabetes mellitus and components in drinking water and diet: a population-based, case-control study in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133683
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Dec;29(6):612-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Victoria S Benson
John A Vanleeuwen
Jennifer Taylor
George S Somers
Patricia A McKinney
Linda Van Til
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, Canada. vicky.benson@ceu.ox.ac.uk
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Dec;29(6):612-24
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Data Collection
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Drinking
Energy intake
Food
Food analysis
Humans
Incidence
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Nitrates - administration & dosage - analysis
Nitrites - administration & dosage - analysis
Nitrosamines - administration & dosage - analysis
Odds Ratio
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Water - chemistry - physiology
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
To determine the relationship between the risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and daily intake of drinking water and dietary components, including nitrate, nitrite, and nitrosamines, during the year prior to diagnosis.
Controls (n = 105) were matched by age at diagnosis and sex to T1D cases (n = 57) newly diagnosed during 2001-2004. Food consumption was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Locally available samples of foods were tested for nitrate, nitrite, and nitrosamine concentrations. Water consumption was determined through an additional questionnaire, and water samples were taken from homes and tested for routine chemical components, including nitrate.
After controlling for age, age, sex, and daily energy intake, nitrate intake from food sources showed a non-significant positive trend (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for quartiles = 1.00, 1.63 (0.58, 4.63), 1.71 (0.54, 5.40), 3.02 (0.78, 11.74); p for trend = 0.13). Nitrite and nitrosamine intake were not related to T1D risk (p for trend = 0.77 and 0.81, respectively). When food and water components were combined, zinc and calcium intakes were marginally and inversely related to T1D risk (p for trend = 0.07 and 0.06, respectively). After further model adjustment of possible confounders and significant risk factors, an increased intake of caffeine marginally increased the risk of T1D (p = 0.07).
Dietary components from both food and water sources may influence the risk of developing T1D in young persons.
PubMed ID
21677125 View in PubMed
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