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Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
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Educating families from ethnic minorities in type 1 diabetes-experiences from a Danish intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29387
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Nov;59(2):164-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Lene Povlsen
Birthe Olsen
Steen Ladelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. Lpovlsen@image.dk
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Nov;59(2):164-70
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - ethnology - metabolism - prevention & control
Educational Measurement
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Hospitals, University
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Minority Groups - education - psychology
Needs Assessment
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Education - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Ethnic minorities may constitute vulnerable groups within Western health care systems as their ability to master severe chronic diseases could be affected by barriers such as different culture and health/illness beliefs, communication problems and limited educational background. An intervention focusing on immigrant families with children with type 1 diabetes is described. The intervention included the development of adapted educational material and guidelines, and a subsequent re-education of children, adolescents and parents from 37 families. The study demonstrated that it was possible to improve health outcome. During the study, the knowledge of diabetes increased, but with considerable differences between the families. HbA(1c) also decreased significantly during the intervention, but increased during follow-up. The paper discusses possible explanations and suggestions for optimising education and calls for new projects where ethnic minorities are active participants in the development of appropriate educational programs and material.
PubMed ID
16257621 View in PubMed
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Experiencing Loss: A Muslim Widow's Bereavement Narrative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279832
Source
J Relig Health. 2016 Feb;55(1):226-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Maria Kristiansen
Tarek Younis
Amani Hassani
Aziz Sheikh
Source
J Relig Health. 2016 Feb;55(1):226-40
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arabs - psychology
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Bereavement
Denmark
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Middle East - ethnology
Narration
Refugees - psychology
Religion and Psychology
Widowhood - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
In this article, we explore how Islam, minority status and refugee experiences intersect in shaping meaning-making processes following bereavement. We do this through a phenomenological analysis of a biographical account of personal loss told by Aisha, a Muslim Palestinian refugee living in Denmark, who narrates her experience of losing her husband to lung cancer. By drawing on a religious framework, Aisha creates meaning from her loss, which enables her to incorporate this loss into her life history and sustain agency. Her narrative invites wider audiences to witness her tale of overcoming loss, thus highlighting the complex way in which religious beliefs, minority status and migration history come together in shaping meaning-making processes, and the importance of reciprocity in narrative studies.
PubMed ID
25958055 View in PubMed
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Globalization and the cultural safety of an immigrant Muslim community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165579
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Feb;57(3):296-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Cynthia Baker
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Associate Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. bakerc@post.queensu.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Feb;57(3):296-305
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Culture
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Internationality
Islam - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Safety
Terrorism
Abstract
This paper reports a study the aim of which was to further understanding of cultural safety by focusing on the social health of a small immigrant community of Muslims in a relatively homogeneous region of Canada following the terror attacks on 11 September 2001 (9/11).
The aftermath of 9/11 negatively affected Muslims living in many centers of Western Europe and North America. Little is known about the social health of Muslims in smaller areas with little cultural diversity. Developed by Maori nurses, the cultural safety concept captures the negative health effects of inequities experienced by the indigenous people of New Zealand. Nurses in Canada have used the concept to understand the health of Aboriginal peoples. It has also been used to investigate the nursing care of immigrants in a Canadian metropolitan centre. Findings indicated, however, that the dichotomy between culturally safe and unsafe groups was blurred.
The methodology was qualitative, based on the constructivist paradigm. A purposive sample of 26 Muslims of Middle Eastern, Indian or Pakistani origin and residing in the province of New Brunswick, Canada were interviewed in 2002-2003. Findings. Participants experienced a sudden transition from cultural safety to cultural risk following 9/11. Their experience of cultural safety included a sense of social integration in the community and invisibility as a minority. Cultural risk stemmed from being in the spotlight of an international media and becoming a visible minority.
Cultural risk is not necessarily rooted in historical events and may be generated by outside forces rather than by longstanding inequities in relationships between groups within the community. Nurses need to think about the cultural safety of their practices when caring for members of socially disadvantaged cultural minority groups as this may affect the health services delivered to them.
PubMed ID
17233649 View in PubMed
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Issues in Islamic biomedical ethics: a primer for the pediatrician.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193098
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):965-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
K M Hedayat
R. Pirzadeh
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA. khedayat@stanford.edu
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):965-71
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bioethics
Child
Child Development - classification
Child Rearing
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Islam - psychology
Jurisprudence
Male
Parenting - psychology
Religion and Medicine
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The United States is becoming increasingly pluralistic. Pediatricians must become familiar with the factors that affect the emotional, physical, and spiritual health of their patients that are outside the kin of the traditionally dominant value system. Although many articles have addressed the cultural and ethnic factors, very few have considered the impact of religion. Islam, as the largest and fastest-growing religion in the world, has adherent throughout the world, including the United States, with 50% of US Muslims being indigenous converts. Islam presents a complete moral, ethical, and medical framework that, while it sometimes concurs, at times diverges or even conflicts with the US secular ethical framework. This article introduces the pediatrician to the Islamic principles of ethics within the field of pediatric care and child-rearing. It demonstrates how these principles may impact outpatient and inpatient care. Special attention is also given to adolescent and end-of-life issues.
PubMed ID
11581452 View in PubMed
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Jinneography: Post-Soviet passages of traumatic exemplarity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279493
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;53(2):217-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Khashayar Beigi
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;53(2):217-33
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigration and Immigration - trends
Humans
Islam - psychology
Politics
Russia
Tajikistan - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
While Russia has historically and geographically close ties with Islam, the second most-practiced religion in its vast territories, the collapse of the USSR changed the terms of this relationship in significant ways. One key shift is the emergence of new immigration patterns between Russia and former Soviet states. Traversing distant lands from the peripheries of the Caucasus and Central Asia to mainland Russia in search of work, migrants have come to recognize each other as fellow Muslims dispersed in a theological geography on the ruins of the universal comradeship dreamed by the Soviet utopia. I propose to study the Islamic pedagogical practice of ibra in the context of sociohistorical dynamics of education and migration between Russia and Central Asia to further locate and analyze this shift in relation to current debates on post-Soviet subjectivity. By discussing the case of a spirit possession of a Tajik national performed in Russia, I argue that the collective participation in the session pedagogically invokes, ciphers, and extends the post-Soviet terrains of history as ibra, or exemplary passage of worldly events. To do so, I first locate the Quranic concept of ibra as a pedagogical paradigm in Islamic traditions as well as an ethnographic lens in the context of educational campaigns for the Muslims of Eurasia and then apply the concept to my analysis of the possession session in order to show that in the ritualistic incarnations of ghosts, or jinns, the civil war of Tajikistan and its continuing cycle of terror is ciphered into a desire for learning, as well as a focus on approximation to the divine.
PubMed ID
25969502 View in PubMed
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Muslim families' understanding of, and reaction to, 'the war on terror'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140037
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2010 Oct;80(4):601-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Cecile Rousseau
Uzma Jamil
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. cecile.rousseau@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2010 Oct;80(4):601-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Child
Communication
Disasters
Empathy
Family - psychology
Humans
India - ethnology
Interviews as Topic
Islam - psychology
Middle Aged
Pakistan - ethnology
Politics
Quebec
Social Identification
Terrorism - psychology
War
Young Adult
Abstract
In multiethnic societies, the consequences of the war on terror (WOT) for Muslim youth are still not well understood and the school's role remains to be defined. This article documents the parent-child transmission of understanding and emotional reaction to the WOT in South Asian Muslim families in Montreal, Canada. For this qualitative study, the researchers interviewed 20 families. Results indicated that the families' emotional reactions and communication about these events were interlinked with family patterns of identity assignation. The majority of parents avoided talking with their children about the WOT and felt that these issues should not be discussed at school. Most children shared their parents' feelings of helplessness and familial patterns of identity assignation. Parents reporting a greater sense of agency displayed less avoidance, had a more complex vision of self and other, and favored the school's role in helping children make sense of these events. These results suggest that school interventions in neighborhoods strained by international tensions should emphasize immigrant parents' empowerment and provide spaces where their children feel comfortable expressing their concerns.
PubMed ID
20950301 View in PubMed
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Muslim women having abortions in Canada: attitudes, beliefs, and experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134062
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Apr;57(4):e134-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Ellen Wiebe
Roya Najafi
Naghma Soheil
Alya Kamani
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Canada. ellenwiebe@yahoo.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Apr;57(4):e134-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - ethics - psychology
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Canada
Female
Guilt
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Islam - psychology
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To improve understanding of the attitudes, beliefs, and experiences of Muslim patients presenting for abortion.
Exploratory study in which participants completed questionnaires about their attitudes, beliefs, and experiences.
Two urban, free-standing abortion clinics.
Fifty-three self-identified Muslim patients presenting for abortion.
Women's background, beliefs, and attitudes toward their religion and toward abortion; levels of anxiety, depression, and guilt, scored on a scale of 0 to 10; and degree of pro-choice or antichoice attitude toward abortion, assessed by having respondents identify under which circumstances a woman should be able to have an abortion.
The 53 women in this study were a diverse group, aged 17 to 47 years, born in 17 different countries, with a range of beliefs and attitudes toward abortion. As found in previous studies, women who were less pro-choice (identified fewer acceptable reasons to have an abortion) had higher anxiety and guilt scores than more pro-choice women did: 6.9 versus 4.9 (P = .01) and 6.9 versus 3.6 (P = .004), respectively. Women who said they strongly agreed that abortion was against Islamic principles also had higher anxiety and guilt scores: 9.3 versus 5.9 (P = .03) and 9.5 versus 5.3 (P = .03), respectively.
Canadian Muslim women presenting for abortion come from many countries and schools of Islam. The group of Muslim women that we surveyed was so diverse that no generalizations can be made about them. Their attitudes toward abortion ranged from being completely prochoice to believing abortion is wrong unless it is done to save a woman's life. Many said they found their religion to be a source of comfort as well as a source of guilt, turning to prayer and meditation to cope with their feelings about the abortion. It is important that physicians caring for Muslim women understand that their patients come from a variety of backgrounds and can have widely differing beliefs. It might be helpful to be aware that patients who hold more anti-choice beliefs are likely to experience more anxiety and guilt related to their abortion than prochoice patients do.
Notes
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Oct;26(10):881-515507198
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2005 Mar;27(3):247-5015937598
Cites: Reprod Biomed Online. 2008;17 Suppl 3:34-818983735
Cites: Reprod Health Matters. 2007 May;15(29):75-8417512379
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2006 Nov;32(11):652-717074823
PubMed ID
21626898 View in PubMed
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Neonatal end-of-life care in Sweden: the views of Muslim women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58416
Source
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2003 Jan-Mar;17(1):77-86
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anita Lundqvist
Tore Nilstun
Anna-Karin Dykes
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Ethics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anita.lundqvist@omv.lu.se
Source
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2003 Jan-Mar;17(1):77-86
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Islam - psychology
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Mothers - psychology
Nursing Care
Professional-Family Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden
Terminal Care
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore Muslim women's views of neonatal end-of-life-care in Sweden. METHODS: Interviews using a standardized questionnaire with open-ended questions about care before birth, directly after birth, and during and after the death of the infant. Content analysis was performed on the data. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven immigrant women of Muslim background living in Sweden. RESULTS: The categories identified were information both useful and threatening, priority of medical facts, maternal feelings, roles of significant others, predetermined lifetime, protection of the dying infant, staff's role, memories aggravate the grief, special tradition, life after death and belief in the future. CONCLUSIONS: The women provided suggestions for improvement of care including being given sufficient information of and the need for culturally sensitive care. In providing care for Muslim women it is imperative that care take into account the woman's religion and ethnicity as well as individual preferences.
PubMed ID
12661741 View in PubMed
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Perceived discrimination and its association with psychological distress among newly arrived immigrants before and after September 11, 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141422
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 May;101(5):909-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Cécile Rousseau
Ghayda Hassan
Nicolas Moreau
Brett D Thombs
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. cecile.rousseau@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 May;101(5):909-15
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arabs - psychology
Checklist
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Prejudice
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
September 11 Terrorist Attacks - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
We compared the evolution of perception of discrimination from 1998 to 2007 among recent Arab (Muslim and non-Muslim) and Haitian immigrants to Montreal; we also studied the association between perception of discrimination and psychological distress in 1998 and 2007.
We conducted this cross-sectional comparative research with 2 samples: one recruited in 1998 (n = 784) and the other in 2007 (n = 432). The samples were randomly extracted from the registry of the Ministry of Immigration and Cultural Communities of Quebec. Psychological distress was measured with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25.
The perception of discrimination increased from 1998 to 2007 among the Arab Muslim, Arab non-Muslim, and Haitian groups. Muslim Arabs experienced a significant increase in psychological distress associated with discrimination from 1998 to 2007.
These results confirm an increase in perception of discrimination and psychological distress among Arab Muslim recent immigrant communities after September 11, 2001, and highlight the importance this context may have for other immigrant groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20724695 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.