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1752 records – page 1 of 176.

ß2 -adrenergic receptor Thr164IIe polymorphism, blood pressure and ischaemic heart disease in 66?750 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131722
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Mar;271(3):305-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
M. Thomsen
M. Dahl
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Mar;271(3):305-14
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal
Myocardial Ischemia - genetics
Myocytes, Smooth Muscle
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Sex Factors
Abstract
The ß(2) -adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is located on smooth muscle cells and is an important regulator of smooth muscle tone. The Thr164Ile polymorphism (rs1800888) in the ADRB2 gene is rare but has profound functional consequences on receptor function and could cause lifelong elevated smooth muscle tone. We tested the hypothesis that Thr164Ile is associated with increased blood pressure, increased frequency of hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
A total of 66 750 individuals from two large Danish general population studies were genotyped, and 1943 Thr164Ile heterozygotes and 16 homozygotes were identified.
Thr164Ile genotype was associated with increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women (trend: P = 0.04 and 0.02): systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 5% and 2%, respectively, in female homozygotes compared with female noncarriers. All female Thr164Ile homozygotes had hypertension compared with 58% of female heterozygotes and 54% of female noncarriers (chi-square: P = 0.001). Female Thr164Ile homozygotes and heterozygotes had odds ratios for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) of 2.93 (0.56-15.5) and 1.28 (1.03-1.61), respectively, compared with female noncarriers (trend: P = 0.007). These differences were not observed in men. Furthermore, Gly16Arg (rs1042713) and Gln27Glu (rs1042714) in the ADRB2 gene were not associated with blood pressure, hypertension or CVD either in the population overall or in women and men separately.
ADRB2 Thr164Ile is associated with increased blood pressure, increased frequency of hypertension and increased risk of IHD amongst women in the general population. These findings, particularly for homozygotes, are novel.
PubMed ID
21883537 View in PubMed
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3 Tesla MRI-detected brain lesions after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation: results of the MACPAF study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121377
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Karl Georg Haeusler
Lydia Koch
Juliane Herm
Ute A Kopp
Peter U Heuschmann
Matthias Endres
Heinz-Peter Schultheiss
Alexander Schirdewan
Jochen B Fiebach
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. georg.haeusler@charite.de
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):14-21
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - pathology - surgery
Brain Ischemia - etiology - pathology
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Heart Conduction System - surgery
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Postoperative Complications - etiology - pathology
Pulmonary Veins - pathology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) is an established therapeutic approach to abolish symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF).
Based on the prospective MACPAF study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01061931) we report the rate of ischemic brain lesions postablation and their impact on cognitive function.
Patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF were randomized to LACA using the Arctic Front® or the HD Mesh Ablator® catheter. All patients underwent brain MRI at 3 Tesla, neurological, and neuropsychological examinations within 48 hours prior and after the ablation procedure.
There was no clinically evident stroke in 37 patients (mean age 62.4 ± 8.4 years; 41% female; median CHADS2 score 1 [IQR 0-2]) after LACA but high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) detected new ischemic lesions in 15 (41%) patients after LACA. Four (27%) of the HD Mesh Ablator® patients and 11 (50%) of the Arctic Front® patients suffered a silent ischemic lesion (P = 0.19). In these 15 patients, there was a nonsignificant trend toward lower cardiac ejection fraction (P = 0.07) and AF episodes during LACA (P = 0.09), while activated clotting time levels, number of energy applications, periprocedural electrocardioversion or CHADS(2) score had no impact. Lesion volumes varied from 5 to 150 mm(3) and 1 to 5 lesions were detected per patient. However, acute brain lesions had no effect on cognitive performance immediately after LACA. Of the DWI lesions postablation 82% were not detectable on FLAIR images 6-9 months postablation.
According to 3 Tesla high-resolution DWI, ischemic brain lesions after LACA were common but not associated with impaired cognitive function after the ablation procedure.
Notes
Comment In: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):22-323130591
PubMed ID
22913568 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke: an original study and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118271
Source
Ann Neurol. 2013 Jan;73(1):38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Peter Brøndum-Jacobsen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Peter Schnohr
Marianne Benn
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Ann Neurol. 2013 Jan;73(1):38-47
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Brain Ischemia - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population.
We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events.
Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend = 2 × 10(-3)). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations between the 1st and 4th percentiles to individuals with 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations between the 50th and 100th percentiles, multivariate adjusted hazard ratio of ischemic stroke was 1.82 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.34). Comparing individuals with clinical categories of severe vitamin D deficiency (
PubMed ID
23225498 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin d levels and risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death: population-based study and meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121124
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter Brøndum-Jacobsen
Marianne Benn
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D associates with increased risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death.
We measured baseline plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10 170 women and men from the Danish general population without vitamin D-fortified food. During 29 years of follow-up, 3100 persons developed ischemic heart disease, 1625 myocardial infarction, and 6747 died. Decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were associated with increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories (P for trend, 2×10(-4)-3×10(-53)). Comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at the 1st to 4th percentile with individuals with levels at the 50th to 100th percentile, the multivariable adjusted risk was increased by 40% (95% CI, 14%-72%) for ischemic heart disease, by 64% (25%-114%) for myocardial infarction, by 57% (38%-78%) for early death, and by 81% (40%-135%) for fatal ischemic heart disease/myocardial infarction. In the meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies, risk of ischemic heart disease and early death were increased by 39% (25%-54%) and 46% (31%-64%) for lowest versus highest quartile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.
We observed increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death with decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. These findings were substantiated in meta-analyses.
PubMed ID
22936341 View in PubMed
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[500 legs too many are amputated in Finland annually].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209673
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(20):1991, 1993, 1995
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

2000 revision of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society 1997 Consensus Conference on the Evaluation and Management of Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196245
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Dec;16(12):1513-36
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
P. Tanser
Author Affiliation
Canadian Cardiovascular Society, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Dec;16(12):1513-36
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - therapy
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
11137915 View in PubMed
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The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
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Abacavir and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy: a population-based nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99479
Source
HIV Med. 2010 Feb;11(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Niels Obel
D K Farkas
G. Kronborg
C S Larsen
G. Pedersen
A. Riis
C. Pedersen
J. Gerstoft
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. niels.obel@rh.regionh.dk
Source
HIV Med. 2010 Feb;11(2):130-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - adverse effects
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Dideoxynucleosides - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine whether exposure to abacavir increases the risk for myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: This was a prospective nationwide cohort study which included all Danish HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) from 1995 to 2005 (N = 2952). Data on hospitalization for MI and comorbidity were obtained from Danish medical databases. Hospitalization rates for MI after HAART initiation were calculated for patients who used abacavir and those who did not. We used Cox's regression to compute incidence rate ratios (IRR) as a measure of relative risk for MI, while controlling for potential confounders (as separate variables and via propensity score) including comorbidity. MAIN OUTCOME: Relative risk of hospitalization with MI in abacavir users compared with abacavir nonusers. RESULTS: Hospitalization rates for MI were 2.4/1000 person-years (PYR) [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.4] for abacavir nonusers and 5.7/1000 PYR (95% CI 4.1-7.9) for abacavir users. The risk of MI increased after initiation of abacavir [unadjusted IRR = 2.22 (95% CI 1.31-3.76); IRR adjusted for confounders = 2.00 (95% CI 1.10-3.64); IRR adjusted for propensity score = 2.00 (95% CI 1.07-3.76)]. This effect was also observed among patients initiating abacavir within 2 years after the start of HAART and among patients who started abacavir as part of a triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimen. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed the association between abacavir use and increased risk of MI. Further studies are needed to control for potential confounding not measured in research to date.
PubMed ID
19682101 View in PubMed
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Abdominal plain film findings in acute ischemic bowel disease differ with age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82474
Source
Acta Radiol. 2006 Apr;47(3):238-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Wadman M.
Syk I.
Elmståhl B.
Ekberg O.
Elmståhl S.
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. maria.wadman@skane.se
Source
Acta Radiol. 2006 Apr;47(3):238-43
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dilatation, Pathologic - radiography
Female
Gases
Humans
Intestines - blood supply - physiology - radiography
Ischemia - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Radiography, Abdominal
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the use and findings of abdominal plain film in acute ischemic bowel disease (AIBD) in different age subsets, and to correlate the clinical findings. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty-nine radiographically examined patients with AIBD at Malmö University Hospital, Sweden between 1987 and 1996. RESULTS: In 89%, the plain film displayed pathologic signs. Bowel dilatation was more common in the elderly. Of 68 patients aged > or = 71 years, 19 (28%) had colon gas/fluid levels with/without colon dilatation, and of 19 patients > 84 years 16 (84%) had small-bowel dilatation. Of 20 patients aged or = 71 years (P = 0.001). Of the patients with diarrhea, 13 of 33 (40%) had colon gas/fluid levels with/without colon dilatation compared to 2 of 29 (7%) without (P = 0.003). In the elderly (> or = 71 years), 48 of 53 (91%) patients with bowel dilatation on plain film died, compared to 11 out of 16 (69%) without this finding (P
PubMed ID
16613303 View in PubMed
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Absent post-ischemic increase of blood flowmotion in the cutaneous microcirculation of healthy chronic cigarette smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78655
Source
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2007;36(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rossi M.
Carpi A.
Di Maria C.
Galetta F.
Santoro G.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. mrossi@int.med.unipi.it
Source
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2007;36(2):163-71
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects - physiology
Female
Forearm - blood supply
Hemorheology - drug effects
Humans
Ischemia - physiopathology
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Microcirculation - drug effects
Middle Aged
Regional Blood Flow
Skin - blood supply
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate whether chronic cigarette smoke habit is associated with changes of laser Doppler (LD) skin blood flowmotion (SBF). We performed spectral analysis of skin forearm LD signal detected by a LD flowmetry (Periflux PF4, Perimed, Sweden) before and during forearm post-ischemic hyperaemia, in 14 healthy chronic smoker subjects and 14 age and sex matched nonsmoker subjects. Forearm skin ischemia was obtained by a pneumatic cuff, positioned at the right arm and inflated for 3 minutes to 30 mmHg above systolic blood pressure. Power spectral density (PSD) of the SBF total spectrum (0.009-1.6 Hz), as well as 0.009-0.02 Hz , 0.02-0.06 Hz, 0.06-0.2 Hz, 0.2-0.6 Hz and 0.6-1.6 Hz frequency intervals (FI), referred to endothelial, sympathetic, myogenic, respiratory and heart activity, respectively, were measured in LD conventional perfusion units (PU)/Hz. Smokers showed a basal SBF total spectrum PSD mean values not significantly different from nonsmokers (2.14+/-1.58 PU/Hz and 1.93+/-1.35 PU/Hz, respectively). Following ischemia, PSD mean value of SBF total spectrum, as well of five FI considered, significantly increased in nonsmokers (p
PubMed ID
17325440 View in PubMed
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1752 records – page 1 of 176.