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Alaska native suicide: lessons for elder suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3656
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Kettl
Author Affiliation
Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Epidemiologic Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology
Abstract
Suicide rates in Alaska Native elders are studied to further explore cultural factors in elderly suicide. Data for the 1960s and 1970s are reviewed, and new data on Alaska Native suicide rates are presented for the 10-year period of 1985 through 1994. In many areas throughout the world, suicide rates are the highest for the elderly. During the Alaska "oil boom," suicide rates more than tripled for the general population but decreased to zero for Alaska Native elders. Cultural teachings from the society's elders were more important during this time of culture upheaval. During the study period, the cultural changes dissipated, and suicide rates for Alaska Native elders, although lower than those of White Alaskans, increased. This provides further evidence that suicide rates for elders can be influenced by social factors--both to raise to lower rates.
PubMed ID
9677507 View in PubMed
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Antenatal depression in socially high-risk women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99053
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 May;63(5):414-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
A. Bowen
N. Stewart
M. Baetz
N. Muhajarine
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. angela.bowen@usask.ca
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 May;63(5):414-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Antenatal depression is potentially deleterious to the mother and baby. Canadian Aboriginal women have an increased risk for living in poverty, family violence, and substance use; however, little is known about antenatal depression in this group. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of depression in socially high-risk, mostly Aboriginal pregnant women. METHODS: Women (Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal), in two prenatal outreach programmes were approached and depressive symptoms between the two groups were compared, using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). RESULTS: Sixty per cent (n = 402) of potential participants were recruited for the study. The prevalence of depression was 29.5% (n = 402). Depression was associated with a history of depression, mood swings, increased stressors, current smoker, and lack of social support. Aboriginal women were more likely to be depressed, but this was not significantly higher than non-Aboriginal women; however, they did experience significantly more self-harm thoughts. Exercise was a significant mediator for depression. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of antenatal depression confirms rates in other high-risk, ethnic minority groups of women. A previous history of depression and mood problems were associated with depression, thus prenatal care should include a careful mental health assessment. On a positive note, the present study suggests that exercise may mediate antenatal depression.
PubMed ID
19155236 View in PubMed
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Arthritis in the Canadian Aboriginal population: North-South differences in prevalence and correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138434
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2010 Dec;31(1):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
C. Ng
S. Chatwood
T K Young
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2010 Dec;31(1):22-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Arthritis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geography
Health Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - utilization
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Information on arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders among Aboriginal people is sparse. Survey data show that arthritis and rheumatism are among the most commonly reported chronic conditions and their prevalence is higher than among non-Aboriginal people.
To describe the burden of arthritis among Aboriginal people in northern Canada and demonstrate the public health significance and social impact of the disease.
Using cross-sectional data from more than 29 000 Aboriginal people aged 15 years and over who participated in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey 2006, we assessed regional differences in the prevalence of arthritis and its association with other risk factors, co-morbidity and health care use.
The prevalence of arthritis in the three northern territories ("North") is 12.7% compared to 20.1% in the provinces ("South") and is higher among females than males in both the North and South. The prevalence among Inuit is lower than among other Aboriginal groups. Individuals with arthritis are more likely to smoke, be obese, have concurrent chronic diseases, and are less likely to be employed. Aboriginal people with arthritis utilized the health care system more often than those without the disease.
Aboriginal-specific findings on arthritis and other chronic diseases as well as recognition of regional differences between North and South will enhance program planning and help identify new priorities in health promotion.
PubMed ID
21176412 View in PubMed
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Assessing health-related quality of life in Northern Plains American Indians: prominence of physical activity as a health behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100501
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Dmitri Poltavski
Jeffrey Holm
Nancy Vogeltanz-Holm
Leander McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of North DakotaGrand Forks, ND 58202-8380, USA. dpoltavski@medicine.nodak.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Motor Activity - physiology
New Mexico - epidemiology - ethnology
North Dakota - epidemiology - ethnology
Quality of Life - psychology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Rural Population
United States - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Associations of behavioral health risks and healthy behaviors with self-reported health-related quality of life measures were investigated in a Northern Plains American Indian sample. Participants were surveyed in person using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results showed that regular physical activity was significantly associated with better self-reported overall health, fewer mentally unhealthy and activity limitation days in the past 30 days, and with a greater number of good health days.
PubMed ID
20683822 View in PubMed
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Assessment of anxiety sensitivity in young American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5551
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2001 Apr;39(4):477-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
M J Zvolensky
D W McNeil
C A Porter
S H Stewart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506-6040, USA. zvolensky@aol.com
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2001 Apr;39(4):477-93
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Anxiety - diagnosis - ethnology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Kansas
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
In the present study, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index [ASI; Behav. Res. Ther. 24 (1986) 1] was administered to 282 American Indian and Alaska Native college students in a preliminary effort to: (a) evaluate the factor structure and internal consistency of the ASI in a sample of Native Americans; (b) examine whether this group would report greater levels of anxiety sensitivity and gender and age-matched college students from the majority (Caucasian) culture lesser such levels; and (c) explore whether gender differences in anxiety sensitivity dimensions varied by cultural group (Native American vs. Caucasian). Consistent with existing research, results of this investigation indicated that, among Native peoples, the ASI and its subscales had high levels of internal consistency, and a factor structure consisting of three lower-order factors (i.e. Physical, Psychological, and Social Concerns) that all loaded on a single higher-order (global Anxiety Sensitivity) factor. We also found that these Native American college students reported significantly greater overall ASI scores as well as greater levels of Psychological and Social Concerns relative to counterparts from the majority (Caucasian) culture. There were no significant differences detected for ASI physical threat concerns. In regard to gender, we found significant differences between males and females in terms of total and Physical Threat ASI scores, with females reporting greater levels, and males lesser levels, of overall anxiety sensitivity and greater fear of physical sensations; no significant differences emerged between genders for the ASI Psychological and Social Concerns dimensions. These gender differences did not vary by cultural group, indicating they were evident among Caucasian and Native Americans alike. We discuss the results of this investigation in relation to the assessment of anxiety sensitivity in American Indians and Alaska Natives, and offer directions for future research with the ASI in Native peoples.
PubMed ID
11280345 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and screening in American Indian and Alaska Native women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126829
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S66-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Marilyn A Roubidoux
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems, Box 5326, TC 2910, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5326, USA. roubidou@umich.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S66-72
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mammography
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
United States - epidemiology
Women's Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Data relative to breast cancer among American Indian and Alaska native (AI/AN) women are limited and vary by regions. Despite national decreases in breast cancer incidence and mortality rates, declines in these measures have not yet appeared among AI/AN women. Health disparities in breast cancer persist, manifest by higher stage at diagnosis, and lower screening rates compared to other racial and ethnic groups. Disproportionately more AI/AN are younger at diagnosis. Screening beginning at age 40, improving access, annual rescreening, community education and outreach, and mobile mammography for rural areas are ways to improve these disparities in breast cancer.
PubMed ID
22351427 View in PubMed
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Cancer-related health behaviours and health service use among Inuit and other residents of Canada's north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97958
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 May;70(9):1396-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
James Ted McDonald
Ryan Trenholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of New Brunswick, PO Box 4400, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5A3. tedmcdon@unb.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 May;70(9):1396-403
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer - utilization
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services - utilization
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Risk factors
Smoking - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
This article identifies the extent to which demographic, socio-economic and geographic factors account for differences between Inuit and other Northern Canadian residents in health-related behaviours and health service use related to cancer incidence and diagnosis. The study population includes Inuit, Métis, First Nation and non-Aboriginal residents aged 21-65 who live in Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Labrador, Nunavik and Jamésie in northern Quebec, and the northern regions of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Data are drawn from confidential versions of the 2000-2001 and 2004-2005 Canadian Community Health Surveys and the 2001 Aboriginal People's Survey produced by Statistics Canada. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis is applied to a set of health-related behaviours including cigarette smoking, binge drinking and obesity, and a set of basic health service use measures including consultation with a physician, consultation with a nurse, Pap smear testing and mammography. We found that significantly higher smoking and binge drinking rates and lower rates of female cancer screening among Inuit are found not to be accounted for by differences in observable demographic and socio-economic characteristics, location of residence or distance from a hospital. As such we conclude that health-related behaviours leading to increased cancer risk and to a lower utilization of diagnostic cancer screening appear to be due to unobserved factors specific to Inuit and their unique social-cultural context. Policy interventions to address these problems may need to be targeted specifically to Inuit Canadians and should not be considered in isolation of their broader health, economic and social environment.
PubMed ID
20172640 View in PubMed
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Changing dietary patterns and body mass index over time in Canadian Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128981
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):511-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nelofar Sheikh
Grace M Egeland
Louise Johnson-Down
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):511-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Obesity - ethnology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) Inuit Health Survey provided an opportunity to compare dietary and body mass index (BMI) data with data collected a decade earlier for the same communities.
A dietary survey included 1,929 randomly selected participants aged 15 years or older, selected from 18 Inuit communities in 1998-1999. The IPY survey included 2,595 randomly selected participants aged 18 years or older, selected from 36 Inuit communities in 2007-2008. Data from the same 18 communities included in both surveys were compared for adults 20 years and older.
Twenty-four-hour dietary recall data were analysed to assess the percentage of energy from traditional and market foods by sex and age groups. Body mass index (BMI) was assessed to establish the prevalence of obesity by sex and age groups in both surveys.
There was a significant decrease (p=0.05) in energy contribution from traditional food and a significant increase in market food consumption over time. Sugar-sweetened beverages, chips and pasta all increased as percentages of energy. BMI increased overall for women and for each age stratum evaluated (p
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):447-922208994
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):444-622208993
PubMed ID
22152598 View in PubMed
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Changing identification among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36081
Source
Demography. 1993 Nov;30(4):635-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
K. Eschbach
Author Affiliation
Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison 53706.
Source
Demography. 1993 Nov;30(4):635-52
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Demography
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Residential Mobility
Social Environment
Social Identification
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The census-enumerated American Indian population dispersed rapidly between 1930 and 1990. Changes in ethnic classification account for most of the change. In the 1980 count, 10 states with historically large Indian populations account for 53% of births of Indians between the ages of 10 and 80, compared with 72% of the first enumerations of the same cohorts. Migration further reduced the share of these states to 46% of Indian residents in these cohorts. Study of the dispersal of the Indian population should focus primarily on the new emergence of the expression of Indian identity, rather than on migration from former population centers.
PubMed ID
8262285 View in PubMed
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Changing rates of suicide ideation and attempts among Inuit youth: a gender-based analysis of risk and protective factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273955
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2015 Apr;45(2):141-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Sarah L Fraser
Dominique Geoffroy
Eduardo Chachamovich
Laurence J Kirmayer
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2015 Apr;45(2):141-56
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Protective factors
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuit in Canada currently suffer from one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of suicide ideations and attempts among 15-24 year olds living in Nunavik, Québec, and to explore risk and protective factors of suicide attempts as a function of gender. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2004 across Nunavik. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were conducted. A total of 22% of young males and 39% of females adults reported past suicidal attempts. Gender differences were observed in relation to associated risk and protective factors as well as degree of exposure to risk factors. Suicide prevention must include alcohol and drug prevention programs and rehabilitation services, interventions to reduce physical and sexual violence and their long-term impacts on Inuit youth, as well as exposure to culturally meaningful activities.
PubMed ID
25255825 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.