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Acculturation and mental disorder in the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2301
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
Seltzer, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Arctic Bay
Hysterical dissociation disorder
Paranoid personality disorder
Resolute Bay
Stress, mental
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anomie
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Role
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The phenomenon of acculturation stress is described with particular reference to the subsequent development of the transitional role conflict. The adolescent and young adult male Eskimo is especially susceptible to the anxiety generated by the process of acculturation and it is the interaction of this external stress with the bio-psychosocial characteristics of the individual within his ecological group, that may lead to an increased incidence of mental disorder. The clinical picture that develops will depend on the complex interaction of this psychosocial stressor and the level of ego development and its accompanying defence and coping strategies. We see how the development of manifest psychopathology in two young Inuit males was intimately associated with the stresses of acculturation acting upon personalities characterized by a low self-esteem and negative self-image, feelings of emasculation and a state of anomie. Coping and defensive strategies exhibited both similarities (drugs, alcohol, withdrawal, actin out) and differences (psychosis versus dissociation). The value of modified supportive therapy with continuity of care aimed at increasing self-esteem through sublimation, identification, reduction of dependency and encouragement of growth and autonomy is described, as are measures aimed at primary prevention.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2319.
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Achieving balance: healing in native art.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116074
Source
J Physician Assist Educ. 2012;23(4):47-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa K Walker
Author Affiliation
Franklin Pierce University, West Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
Source
J Physician Assist Educ. 2012;23(4):47-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Art
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Nature
Abstract
It has been my great fortune to have spent this past summer traveling across North America with my husband. We left our home state of New Hampshire in June and, in late July, arrived in the 49th state, Alaska, where we have settled in for the winter. From Manitoulin Island and the shores of Lake Huron to the Black Hills of South Dakota and on through the Canadian Rockies, we traveled through a number of North American Native communities. It is this experience and my recent introduction to Alaskan Native culture and peoples that are the impetus for this feature, where I will explore the historical and re-emerging use of art to promote health and healing in Native communities.
PubMed ID
23437624 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native drug users and sexually transmitted disease: results of a five-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3064
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
D G Fisher
A M Fenaughty
D M Paschane
H H Cagle
Author Affiliation
IVDU Project ESB-207, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):47-57
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - ethnology
Counseling
Crack Cocaine
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although Alaska has one of the highest rates of alcohol consumption in the U.S., there are very few reports of other drug use in Alaska. This five-year NIDA-funded study sampled out-of-treatment injection drug users (IDUs) and crack cocaine smokers in Anchorage, Alaska. This paper is a summary of results comparing risk behavior for HIV and sexually transmitted disease infection among Alaska Natives (n=216) to non-Natives (primarily Blacks n=394 and Whites n=479) from this study. IDUs and crack cocaine smokers were recruited using a targeted sampling plan. All subjects tested positive to cocaine metabolites, or morphine, using urinalysis, or had visible track marks. Several analyses of this database have indicated that Alaska Native women are at high risk for gonorrhea infection. They are also at risk for HIV infection due to high rates of behavior related to blood-borne disease transmission. We have also found that White men who have sex with both White and Alaska Native women are significantly less likely to use condoms with the Alaska Native women. HIV preventive education efforts aimed at Alaska Native women need to be implemented on a major scale.
PubMed ID
11279553 View in PubMed
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Alaska native suicide: lessons for elder suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3656
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Kettl
Author Affiliation
Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Epidemiologic Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology
Abstract
Suicide rates in Alaska Native elders are studied to further explore cultural factors in elderly suicide. Data for the 1960s and 1970s are reviewed, and new data on Alaska Native suicide rates are presented for the 10-year period of 1985 through 1994. In many areas throughout the world, suicide rates are the highest for the elderly. During the Alaska "oil boom," suicide rates more than tripled for the general population but decreased to zero for Alaska Native elders. Cultural teachings from the society's elders were more important during this time of culture upheaval. During the study period, the cultural changes dissipated, and suicide rates for Alaska Native elders, although lower than those of White Alaskans, increased. This provides further evidence that suicide rates for elders can be influenced by social factors--both to raise to lower rates.
PubMed ID
9677507 View in PubMed
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Alcohol as a risk factor for HIV transmission among American Indian and Alaska Native drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3002
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):1-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
J A Baldwin
C J Maxwell
A M Fenaughty
R T Trotter
S J Stevens
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Physical Education, Exercise Science and Nutrition, NAU P.O. Box 15095, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA. Julie.Baldwin@nau.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):1-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Alcoholism - ethnology - psychology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Crack Cocaine
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - transmission
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - ethnology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
Quantitative alcohol interviews conducted as part of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Native American Supplement revealed very high rates of alcohol use among American Indian and Alaska Native active crack and injection drug users (IDUs). Of 147 respondents who completed the alcohol questionnaire, 100& percent had drunk alcohol within the past month, almost 42& percent reported that they drank every day, and 50& percent drank until they were drunk one-half of the time or more. Injection drug users (IDUs) demonstrated the highest frequency and quantity of alcohol use in the past 30 days. A significant positive association was also found between crack and alcohol use in the past 48 hours (c(2)=5.30, p
PubMed ID
11279550 View in PubMed
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Alcohol/drug exposure, HIV-related sexual risk among urban American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: evidence from a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130730
Source
J Sch Health. 2011 Nov;81(11):671-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler
Malembe S Ebama
Author Affiliation
Texas/Oklahoma AIDS Education and Training Center, Parkland Health and Hospital Systems, Dallas, USA. srmikl@parknet.pmh.org
Source
J Sch Health. 2011 Nov;81(11):671-9
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcoholism - ethnology
Condoms - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology
Male
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Migration of the native populations from reservations to the urban areas has resulted in mixed ethnicities of American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) children. Minority youth require special attention and services in urban schools as they disproportionately experience poverty, low educational attainment, unemployment, and single-parent status.
We used 2005 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data to examine alcohol/drug use patterns and their association with sexual risk taking among AIAN only (single-racial) and biracial youth in combination with White, African American, or Hispanic ethnicities (N = 1178).
Overall, one half of the students were sexually active, with significantly higher rates among males; AIAN-Black students initiated sex earlier than the other groups. Condom nonuse is higher among AIAN-Whites (>50%) compared to one third of AIAN-Hispanics and one fourth of AIAN-Blacks. Nearly 10% of all students, except AIAN-Blacks, reported lifetime use of heroin/meth. Sexual behavior was significantly associated with episodic drinking. Students with Hispanic background have twice the odds of being sexually active compared to AIANs.
Our findings underscore growing health care needs and targeted prevention initiatives for mixed racial underserved native youth. Urban school settings have potential to deliver services and offer alcohol/drug prevention programs to address the needs of mixed racial native urban youth. Using the School Based Health Clinic model has been successful; we need to reform prevention approaches to accommodate needs of multiracial urban native youth.
PubMed ID
21972987 View in PubMed
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Alcohol problems in Alaska Natives: lessons from the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83359
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(1):1-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
  1 document  
Author
Seale J Paul
Shellenberger Sylvia
Spence John
Author Affiliation
Family Health Center, Macon, GA 31206, USA. seale.paul@mccg.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(1):1-31
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
378308
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude to Health
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Motivation
Nuclear Family - psychology
Risk factors
Abstract
In this Alaska Native study, cultural "insiders" analyzed problems associated with increased alcohol availability, factors which have reduced alcohol-related problems, and ideas for improving treatment in an Inuit community. Participants described frequent binging, blackouts, family violence, suicide, loss of child custody, and feelings of intergenerational grief. Helpful existing treatment approaches include alcohol ordinances, inpatient treatment programs, twelve-step groups, and religious involvement. Participants urged the development of family treatment approaches which integrate Inuit customs and values.
PubMed ID
17602395 View in PubMed
Documents

131_Seale_Alcohol_Problems_1-31.pdf

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Alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training reduces psychopathology in a cohort of male and female Canadian aboriginals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117003
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2012;26(2):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
James V Hardt
Author Affiliation
Biocybernaut Institute Inc., USA. biocyber@ix.netcom.com
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2012;26(2):8-12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Alpha Rhythm - physiology
Anxiety - ethnology - therapy
Canada
Cohort Studies
Depression - ethnology - therapy
Female
Hostility
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neurofeedback - methods - physiology
Personality Assessment
Abstract
The study was conducted to determine if alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training can have positive psychological results by reducing anxiety and other psychopathology.
The cohort participated in alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training for 76 minutes (day 1) to 120 or more minutes (days 5-7) daily for 7 days. Electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes were attached to the head with conductive gel according to the 10-20 International Electrode Placement System. During training, participants were seated in a comfortable armchair within a soundproof and lightproof room. Brain-wave signals were amplified for processing by analog-to-digital converters and polygraphs, then filtered to the pure delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands as well as subbands of these bands of the EEG. For 2-minute epochs, trainees sat with their eyes closed in the dark listening to their feedback tones as the filtered alpha brain-wave EEG signals controlled the loudness of the tones. Then a "ding" sounded and the tones stopped. For 8 seconds, a monitor lit up with dimly illuminated, static numbers, indicating the strength of their alpha brain waves, after which the feedback tones resumed and the process was repeated.
40 adult volunteers were recruited from the aboriginal population (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit) of Canada. The cohort ranged in age from 25 to 60 years and included males and females.
The study was conducted at Biocybernaut Institute of Canada in Victoria, British Columbia.
Data was obtained to determine the effectiveness of this training by giving four psychological tests (Minnesota Multi-Phasic Personality Inventory, and the trait forms of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List, Clyde Mood Scale, and Profile of Mood States) on the first day prior to commencing training and on the seventh day upon completion of the training. EEG data was also compiled throughout the training and analyzed as a factor of the training process.
Postintervention data showed positive results with reduction of psychopathology when compared to the data from testing prior to the training. Analysis of this data showed improvement in several areas of psychopathology.
Alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training daily for 7 days does have positive psychological results in adult male and female Canadian aboriginals as measured by data from four psychological tests on the participants.
PubMed ID
23341412 View in PubMed
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American Indian perspectives on evidence-based practice implementation: results from a statewide Tribal Mental Health Gathering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277764
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015 Jan;42(1):29-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Sarah Cusworth Walker
Ron Whitener
Eric W Trupin
Natalie Migliarini
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015 Jan;42(1):29-39
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Cultural Competency
Evidence-Based Practice - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Washington
Abstract
Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices (EBP) within American Indian and Alaskan Natives communities is currently an area of debate and contention. There is considerable concern about expanding EBP policy mandates to AI/AN communities as these mandates, either through funding restrictions or other de facto policies, recall past histories of clinical colonization and exploitation by the state and federal government. As a response, work is being done to evaluate indigenous programs and examine strategies for culturally-sensitive implementation. While the literature reflects the perspectives of AI/AN populations on EBP generally, no one has yet reported the perspectives of AI/AN communities on how to feasibly achieve widespread EBP implementation. We report the findings of a statewide Tribal Gathering focused on behavioral health interventions for youth. The Gathering participants included AI/AN individuals as well as staff working with AI/AN populations in tribal communities. Participants identified strengths and weaknesses of the five legislatively fundable programs for youth delinquency in Washington State and discussed strategies likely to be effective in promoting increased uptake within tribes. Analysis of these discussions resulted in many useful insights in program-specific and community-driven strategies for implementation. In addition, two major themes emerged regarding widespread uptake: the importance of a multi-phase engagement strategy and adopting a consortium/learning community model for implementation. The findings from this Gathering offer important lessons that can inform current work regarding strategies to achieve a balance of program fidelity and cultural-alignment. Attending to engagement practices at the governance, community and individual level are likely to be key components of tribal-focused implementation. Further, efforts to embed implementation within a consortium or learning community hold considerable promise as a strategy for sustainability.
PubMed ID
24242820 View in PubMed
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Antenatal depression in socially high-risk women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99053
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 May;63(5):414-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
A. Bowen
N. Stewart
M. Baetz
N. Muhajarine
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. angela.bowen@usask.ca
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 May;63(5):414-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Antenatal depression is potentially deleterious to the mother and baby. Canadian Aboriginal women have an increased risk for living in poverty, family violence, and substance use; however, little is known about antenatal depression in this group. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of depression in socially high-risk, mostly Aboriginal pregnant women. METHODS: Women (Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal), in two prenatal outreach programmes were approached and depressive symptoms between the two groups were compared, using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). RESULTS: Sixty per cent (n = 402) of potential participants were recruited for the study. The prevalence of depression was 29.5% (n = 402). Depression was associated with a history of depression, mood swings, increased stressors, current smoker, and lack of social support. Aboriginal women were more likely to be depressed, but this was not significantly higher than non-Aboriginal women; however, they did experience significantly more self-harm thoughts. Exercise was a significant mediator for depression. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of antenatal depression confirms rates in other high-risk, ethnic minority groups of women. A previous history of depression and mood problems were associated with depression, thus prenatal care should include a careful mental health assessment. On a positive note, the present study suggests that exercise may mediate antenatal depression.
PubMed ID
19155236 View in PubMed
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193 records – page 1 of 20.