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Class I HLA antigens in spondyloarthropathy: observations in Alaskan Eskimo patients and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3732
Source
J Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;24(3):500-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
G S Boyer
D W Templin
A. Bowler
R C Lawrence
S P Heyse
D F Everett
J C Cornoni-Huntley
W P Goring
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;24(3):500-6
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Child
Female
HLA-B27 Antigen - analysis - genetics
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - analysis
Homozygote
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - ethnology - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of HLA-B27 and other class I histocompatibility antigens in overall risk and clinical manifestations of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) in Alaskan Eskimos. METHODS: Class I antigens were studied in 104 patients with SpA and in 111 controls. The frequencies of HLA-A, B, and Cw antigens were determined in patients with SpA with various clinical manifestations and compared to frequencies observed in controls. RESULTS: Only HLA-B27 differed significantly in cases and controls. Except for B27, no association of particular antigens with specific syndromes or disease features was found. Patients with B27 had more extraarticular manifestations than patients who lacked B27 antigen. Patients putatively homozygous for B27 did not appear to have more severe disease than those who were heterozygotic. B27 was most closely associated with ankylosing spondylitis [odds ratio (OR) = 210], less so with reactive arthritis (OR = 12.9) and undifferentiated SpA (OR = 4.6). CONCLUSION: Observations in other population groups that implicated B27 cross reactive group (CREG) and other A, B, and Cw antigens as risk factors for developing SpA were not confirmed in Alaskan Eskimos. Nor were CREG or other B antigens either alone or in combination with B27 associated with specific clinical syndromes. Only HLA-B27 was strongly associated with disease and with extraarticular manifestations.
PubMed ID
9058656 View in PubMed
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A comparison of patients with spondyloarthropathy seen in specialty clinics with those identified in a communitywide epidemiologic study. Has the classic case misled us?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3731
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1997 Oct 13;157(18):2111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-1997
Author
G S Boyer
D W Templin
A. Bowler
R C Lawrence
D F Everett
S P Heyse
J. Cornoni-Huntley
W P Goring
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage, USA.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1997 Oct 13;157(18):2111-7
Date
Oct-13-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Arthritis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Community Health Services
Comparative Study
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Office Visits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Specialism
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Undiagnosed cases of seronegative spondyloarthropathy (Spa) are often observed during epidemiologic studies. OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent of and the reasons for the underdiagnosis of Spa. METHODS: We studied 2 groups of Alaskan native patients with Spa using a standardized protocol that included an interview, physical examination, medical record review, and radiographic and laboratory examinations. One group consisted of patients identified in a communitywide epidemiologic study; the other group consisted of patients from related but geographically separate populations who had been diagnosed by a specialist in the hospital or a specialty clinic. All cases met the current classification criteria for Spa. The clinical and demographic features of the cases in the 2 groups were compared. RESULTS: Fifty-five (72%) of the 76 community cases that we identified in the epidemiologic study had not been diagnosed previously as Spa. Among the undiagnosed patients were 34 (94%) of the 36 women, 11 (65%) of the 17 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, 12 (36%) of the 33 patients with reactive arthritis, and 24 (100%) of those with undifferentiated Spa. The community and specialty clinic patient groups were similar in age of onset of joint and back pain and in overall symptoms. The specialty clinic group had a higher proportion of men, more severe disease, and a higher frequency of iritis. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of Spa was missed more often than not in the primary care setting, probably because most of the cases were of mild or moderate severity and did not fit the classic descriptions of spondyloarthropathic disorders. The higher proportion of men among the specialty clinic cases probably reflects provider expectation as well as a slightly milder disease course in women.
PubMed ID
9382668 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies between patient recall and the medical record. Potential impact on diagnosis and clinical assessment of chronic disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3738
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1995 Sep 25;155(17):1868-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1995
Author
G S Boyer
D W Templin
W P Goring
J C Cornoni-Huntley
D F Everett
R C Lawrence
S P Heyse
A. Bowler
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage, USA.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1995 Sep 25;155(17):1868-72
Date
Sep-25-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis - diagnosis
Chronic Disease
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Inuits
Medical Records
Mental Recall
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spinal Osteophytosis - diagnosis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: During a case-control study, data necessary for fulfilling diagnostic and classification criteria for spondyloarthropathy were collected from 121 patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the potential impact of differences between patient recall and the medical record on diagnosis and clinical characterization of spondyloarthropathy as a model of chronic disease. METHODS: The study was conducted among four Alaskan Eskimo populations served by the Alaska Native Health Service. Two sets of historical data were compiled for each subject, one acquired during the interview and the other derived from the medical record. Paired items from the interview and the medical record were analyzed to determine discrepancies and consequent effects on diagnosis, classification, and disease characterization. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed in the reporting of genitourinary or diarrheal illnesses preceding or associated with arthritis, the occurrence of eye inflammation in association with joint pain, the occurrence of joint pain and back pain together, and the age at onset of back pain all of which are important to the diagnosis and classification of spondyloarthropathy. In contrast, for information needed to establish the probable inflammatory nature of back pain, patient interview was more helpful than the medical records, which did not provide adequate details to differentiate inflammatory from mechanical back pain. CONCLUSIONS: Patient recall bias can substantially affect diagnosis and clinical assessment of chronic disease, as exemplified by spondyloarthropathy. Reliance on records alone, however, may lead to underestimation of features that require subjective appraisal by the patient.
PubMed ID
7677553 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group preliminary classification criteria in Alaskan Eskimo populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3752
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1993 Apr;36(4):534-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
G S Boyer
D W Templin
W P Goring
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage.
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1993 Apr;36(4):534-8
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Arthritis - radiography
Europe - epidemiology
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sacroiliac Joint - radiography
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - classification - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the preliminary classification criteria proposed by the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) in Alaskan Eskimo populations. METHODS. We examined, interviewed, and reviewed the records of 104 Eskimo patients with spondylarthropathy and 75 with other rheumatic disorders, and evaluated them according to the proposed criteria. RESULTS. We found an overall sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 89.3%, which is similar to the reported values in European populations. CONCLUSION. The ESSG criteria performed well in a population very different from that in which they were developed, and deserve further evaluation as a much-needed and useful epidemiologic tool.
PubMed ID
8457228 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of spondyloarthropathies in Alaskan Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3743
Source
J Rheumatol. 1994 Dec;21(12):2292-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
G S Boyer
D W Templin
J C Cornoni-Huntley
D F Everett
R C Lawrence
S F Heyse
M M Miller
W P Goring
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1994 Dec;21(12):2292-7
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Arthritis - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Spinal Diseases - ethnology
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To estimate the prevalence of spondyloarthropathies (SpA) in 2 Alaskan Eskimo populations, using improved methodology for case ascertainment and new, more inclusive classification criteria. METHODS. Through existing rheumatic disease registries, health care providers and the Alaska Area Native Health Service (AANHS) computerized patient information system, we identified all native residents of the 2 study regions with a diagnosis of any inflammatory arthritis or problems characteristic of SpA, such as iritis or persistent back pain. Individuals with such diagnoses or problems were evaluated in clinic, according to a standardized protocol (interview, examination), and by medical record review, pelvic radiography and laboratory tests. Each case was evaluated according to standard diagnostic criteria for the individual disease entities and by the Amor and European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) preliminary classification criteria for SpA. RESULTS. We identified 104 cases of SpA in the combined Eskimo populations, an overall prevalence of 2.5% in adults aged 20 and over. Both undifferentiated (USpA) and reactive SpA were more common than ankylosing spondylitis (AS). CONCLUSION. Using the new criteria and a more effective approach to case ascertainment we found the prevalence of SpA to be about twice that found in our earlier studies of adult Eskimo populations. The prevalence of SpA was very similar in men and women. Despite the known high prevalence (25-40%) of HLA-B27 in the study populations we did not find the prevalence of any form of SpA to be as strikingly high as that of AS (6-10%) for the Canadian Haida.
PubMed ID
7699631 View in PubMed
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Prevalence rates of spondyloarthropathies, rheumatoid arthritis, and other rheumatic disorders in an Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3764
Source
Journal of Rheumatology. 1988 Apr;15(4):678-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988
Author
G S Boyer
A P Lanier
D W Templin
Author Affiliation
Internal Medicine Service, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage.
Source
Journal of Rheumatology. 1988 Apr;15(4):678-83
Date
Apr-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Ankylosing spondylitis
Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid - ethnology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - ethnology
Female
Gout
Humans
Inuits
Joint Diseases - ethnology
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
Male
Reiter syndrome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatic Diseases - ethnology
Rheumatoid arthritis
Spinal Diseases - ethnology
Spondyloarthropathy
Abstract
We reviewed rheumatic diseases in an Inupiat Eskimo population and found a high frequency of seronegative spondyloarthritides. Most cases of juvenile arthritis, which occurred with particularly high incidence in male children (47.4/100,000), appeared to belong in the spondyloarthropathic category. Both Reiter's disease and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy were common disorders in adults. The prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (0.2%) was less than expected in a population with a high percentage of HLA-B27 positive individuals. The prevalence rates of rheumatoid arthritis (1.0%), gout (0.3%), and other rheumatic diseases were similar to those of the United States population in general.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2644.
PubMed ID
3260953 View in PubMed
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Rheumatic diseases in Alaskan Indians of the southeast coast: high prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3758
Source
J Rheumatol. 1991 Oct;18(10):1477-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
G S Boyer
D W Templin
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Internal Medicine Service, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage 99501.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1991 Oct;18(10):1477-84
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A review of rheumatic diseases in the southeast coastal Indians of Alaska revealed high frequencies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both prevalence and incidence rates of RA were significantly higher and the peak age of incidence was younger in the southeast Alaskan Indian population than in Alaskan Eskimo groups and the United States population in general. The prevalence of SLE in the Alaskan Indian population was about twice that reported for most white populations. The frequency of seronegative spondyloarthropathic disorders was similar in the Alaskan Indian and Eskimo populations. Comparable studies of the prevalence of spondyloarthropathy in general have not been carried out in white populations. The prevalence rate of ankylosing spondylitis, one of the major types of spondyloarthropathy, did not differ significantly in the SE Indians from rates in predominantly white US populations.
PubMed ID
1765971 View in PubMed
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Spondylarthropathic diseases in indigenous circumpolar populations of Russia and Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3733
Source
Rev Rhum Engl Ed. 1996 Dec;63(11):815-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
L I Benevolenskaya
G S Boyer
S. Erdesz
D W Templin
L I Alexeeva
R C Lawrence
S P Heyse
M Y Krylov
N M Mylov
J C Cornoni-Huntley
D F Everett
W P Goring
A. Bowler
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Genetics of Rheumatic Diseases, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow.
Source
Rev Rhum Engl Ed. 1996 Dec;63(11):815-22
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Arthritis, Reactive - ethnology - genetics
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
HLA-B27 Antigen - analysis
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Russia - epidemiology
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
AIMS: To compare the nature and frequency of spondylarthropathy in geographically separated but genetically related populations with a high prevalence of HLA-B27. METHODS: Using a common questionnaire and disease criteria, cases were ascertained through cross-sectional community surveys in Russia and by examination and study of possible cases identified through rheumatic disease registries and the Native Health Service's computerized patient care data system in Alaska. RESULTS: Similar overall prevalences of spondyloarthropathy (2.0-3.4%) and a similar spectrum of disease were found, including reactive arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondylarthropathy. Psoriatic arthritis was very rare. CONCLUSION: No predisposition to one particular form of spondyloarthropathy was observed; genetic and microbial settings for a spectrum of disease were present. Among adults positive for the presence of HLA-B27 the prevalence of all types of spondylarthropathies was estimated to be 4.5%, all populations combined, and the prevalence of AS was estimated to be 1.6%.
PubMed ID
9010969 View in PubMed
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Spondyloarthropathies in circumpolar populations: I. Design and methods of United States and Russian studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3735
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996 Oct;55(4):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
R C Lawrence
D F Everett
L I Benevolenskaya
G S Boyer
S. Erdesz
D W Templin
L I Alexeeva
A P Lanier
Krylov MYu
J C Cornoni-Huntley
N M Mylov
S. Heyse
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996 Oct;55(4):187-94
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Arthritis - ethnology
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Data Collection
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
International Cooperation
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Russia
Siberia - epidemiology
Spinal Diseases - ethnology
United States
Abstract
Parallel epidemiologic studies of spondyloarthropathy in aboriginal circumpolar populations were carried out by U.S. and Russian investigators. These complementary studies used the same data collection instrument and disease criteria to facilitate comparisons. During three expeditions to Siberia, Russian investigators collected cross-sectional data from four settlements of Eskimos and Chukchi Indians on the Chukotka peninsula for a study of disease prevalence. U.S. researchers collected cross-sectional data from Eskimos in four Alaskan regions for studies of prevalence and longitudinal data for studies of clinical manifestations, natural history, disease impact, and health care utilization. The aims of these studies were to describe the spectrum of spondyloarthropathy in these populations, and to lay the groundwork for investigations of the role of specific genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis and expression of disease. These studies were carried out with a minimum disruption to the native people.
PubMed ID
9115545 View in PubMed
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Spondyloarthropathies in circumpolar populations: II. Characterization of the populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3734
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996 Oct;55(4):195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
G S Boyer
L I Benevolenskaya
D W Templin
S. Erdesz
L I Alexeeva
R C Lawrence
S P Heyse
Krylov MYu
N M Mylov
J C Cornoni-Huntley
D F Everett
W P Goring
A. Bowler
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage, USA.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996 Oct;55(4):195-203
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Anthropometry
Arthritis - blood - ethnology - immunology
Blood Group Antigens
Child
Continental Population Groups
HLA-B27 Antigen - analysis
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Siberia - epidemiology
Spinal Diseases - blood - ethnology - immunology
Abstract
For epidemiologic studies of spondyloarthropathy in circumpolar peoples of Chukotka, Russia and Alaska, we gathered demographic, physical and laboratory data to provide a background for evaluating and comparing factors that may influence susceptibility and clinical expression of disease. The study groups included the Chukchi and Siberian Eskimo of Russia and the Inupiat and Yupik Eskimo of Alaska. The 4 groups were remarkably similar in population structure, educational attainment, mean hemoglobin concentrations and frequency of the Class I histocompatibility antigen HLAB27. The Alaskan and Chukotkan groups were similar in mean height, but the Alaskans had higher body weights and significantly greater body mass indexes, probably a reflection of a shift away from traditional lifestyle and diet. Differences in the frequencies of ABO and MN blood group antigens were also apparent, with higher frequencies of blood group M in the Alaskan populations, particularly the Inupiat.
PubMed ID
9115546 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.