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3231 records – page 1 of 324.

Source
Laval Med. 1969 Dec;40(10):1049-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1969
Author
R. Michaud
Source
Laval Med. 1969 Dec;40(10):1049-53
Date
Dec-1969
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Preventive Medicine
PubMed ID
5400670 View in PubMed
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2009 Circumpolar Inuit Health Summit: Yellowknife, Canada, July 9-10, 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296469
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Canada. 17 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2009
CIRCUMPOLAR INUIT HEALTH SUMMIT2009 Yellowknife, Canada July 9-10, 2009 Acknowledgements The Inuit Circumpolar Council would like to thank the participants of the Circumpolar Inuit Health Summit for trav- elling to Yellowknife and sharing their knowledge. For this report, comments from Gert
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Canada. 17 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
1875662
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Inuit
Health and wellness
Documents

2009_healthsummitreport_final.pdf

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2010-2011 Annual Report: Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297081
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
2010-2011 ANNUAL REPORT INUIT CIRCUMPOLAR COUNCIL (CANADA) INUIT CIRCUMPOLAR COUNCIL OFFICES CANADA 75 Albert Street, Suite 1001, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5E7 P: 613.563.2642 F: 613.565.3089 E-mail: icc@inuitcircumpolar.com Website: www.inuitcircumpolar.com ALASKA 3000
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 26 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2639832
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Health
Environment
Sustainable development
Documents

20102011annualreportenglish.pdf

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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
............................................................................................................................................... 13 ICC Canada/Arctic Net Coordination ................................................................................................... 14 Inuit Research Advisors ........................................................................................................................ 14
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3283810
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Sustainable development
Environment
Health
Mercury
Languages
Documents

merged_document__2_.pdf

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2017/18 Annual Report : Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297094
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canda. Ottawa, ON. 76 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
Ph ot o cr ed it: V in ce nt D es ro sie rs Table of contents President’s message 2 Hosting the ICC Chair 2014–2018 5 ICC’S 13th General Assembly – 2018 10 Inuit Crown Partnership Committee 11 Maximizing Permanent Participant Status at the Arctic Council 12 Maximizing ICC’s
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canda. Ottawa, ON. 76 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3830676
Keywords
Inuit
Environment
Health
Knowledge
youth
Documents

icc_2017-2018_annual_report_for_web.pdf

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ABH secretion polymorphism in Icelanders, Aland Islanders, Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi and Greenland Eskimos: a review and new data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237022
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1986 May-Jun;13(3):273-85
Publication Type
Article
Author
A W Eriksson
K. Partanen
R R Frants
J C Pronk
P J Kostense
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1986 May-Jun;13(3):273-85
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland
Greenland
Humans
Iceland
Inuits
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Saliva - immunology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The secretion of the ABH antigens in saliva was tested in indigenous individuals of several populations: Icelanders in Reykjavik and Husavik (northeastern Iceland), Aland Islanders, Finno-Ugrians (Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi) and Eskimos (Augpilagtok, northwestern Greenland). The frequencies of ABH non-secretors among the Icelanders (28-36%) were among the highest ever noted in Europeans. Among Alanders and Swedes on the Finnish mainland the frequency (around 20%) was comparable to Swedish values but considerably higher than among Finns (13-14%). The values among northeastern Finns and Komi (about 9%) were intermediate between values among Lapps (below 5%) and Scandinavians (15-26%), excluding Icelanders (28-41%). The average frequency of non-secretors among Lapps in Finland (2.2 +/- 0.5%) was the lowest observed among white populations. Like many other arctic populations of the Mongolian race, the Greenland Eskimos had a very low frequency of non-secretors. It is probable that the non-secretor allele ABH*se was absent from the ancient Lapps and Greenland Eskimos but introduced by invading populations. It is concluded that the ABH*se allele frequencies vary much more among northern European populations than hitherto appreciated. Recent studies indicate that the non-secretor status of the ABH blood group substances in mucous body fluids is associated with pathological conditions of the mucous membranes of the embryologically related digestive and respiratory systems, particularly with duodenal ulcer and gastric (pre)malignancies but probably also with pulmonary dysfunction. In view of these disadvantages of the ABH non-secretor status the high frequency of ABH*se in Icelanders is a paradoxical phenomenon. The frequency of ABH non-secretors among the founders (Vikings) of Iceland may have been considerably higher than among the present populations in northwestern Europe. The increase in northwestern direction of the ABH*se allele frequencies supports this hypothesis; the dilution effect has not been as strong in Iceland as on the European continent.
PubMed ID
3752918 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of cornea, lens and retina. Survey findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2704
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Wyatt, H.T.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Corneal scarring
Labrador keratopathy
Pterygium
Degenerative retinal disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cataract - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cornea
European Continental Ancestry Group
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lens, Crystalline
Middle Aged
Retinal Diseases - epidemiology
Vision
Visual acuity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation 2521.
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ABO blood groups and tuberculosis in North and East Greenlanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6505
Source
Scand J Respir Dis. 1974;55(2):162-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

The Aboriginal economic benchmarking report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294132
Source
The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board. 37 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 2012
meaningful improvements in the economic participation of First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples. In the coming years, the NAEDB will release Progress Reports to track improvement across the indicators set out in this report, and to track Aboriginal Canadians’ progress toward our targets. It is my sincere
  1 document  
Source
The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board. 37 p.
Date
June 2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3667838
Keywords
Canada
Humans
First Nations
Inuit
Métis
Notes
Updated and reprinted.
Documents

the-aboriginal-economic-benchmarking-report.pdf

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Source
CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1996
Author
H L MacMillan
A B MacMillan
D R Offord
J L Dingle
Author Affiliation
Center for Studies of Children at Risk.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-78
Date
Dec-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Morbidity
Mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To inform health care workers about the health status of Canada's native people. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search for articles published from Jan. 1, 1989, to Nov. 31, 1995, with the use of subject headings "Eskimos" and "Indians, North American," excluding specific subject headings related to genetics and history. Case reports were excluded. Material was also identified from a review of standard references and bibliographies and from consultation with experts. STUDY SELECTION: Review and research articles containing original data concerning epidemiologic aspects of native health. Studies of Canadian populations were preferred, but population-based studies of US native peoples were included if limited Canadian information was available. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about target population, methods and conclusions was extracted from each study. RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity rates are higher in the native population than in the general Canadian population. The infant mortality rates averaged for the years 1986 to 1990 were 13.8 per 1000 live births among Indian infants, 16.3 per 1000 among Inuit infants, and only 7.3 per 1000 among all Canadian infants. Age-standardized all-cause mortality rates among residents of reserves averaged for the years 1979 to 1983 were 561.0 per 100,000 population among men and 334.6 per 100,000 among women, compared with 340.2 per 100,000 among all Canadian men and 173.4 per 100,000 among all Canadian women. Compared with the general Canadian population, specific native populations have an increased risk of death from alcoholism, homicide, suicide and pneumonia. Of the aboriginal population of Canada 15 years of age and older, 31% have been informed that they have a chronic health problem. Diabetes mellitus affects 6% of aboriginal adults, compared with 2% of all Canadian adults. Social problems identified by aboriginal people as a concern in their community include substance abuse, suicide, unemployment and family violence. Subgroups of aboriginal people are at a greater-than-normal risk of infectious diseases, injuries, respiratory diseases, nutritional problems (including obesity) and substance abuse. Initial data suggest that, compared with the general population, some subgroups of the native population have a lower incidence of heart disease and certain types of cancer. However, knowledge about contributing factors to the health status of aboriginal people is limited, since the literature generally does not assess confounding factors such as poverty. CONCLUSIONS: Canadian aboriginal people die earlier than their fellow Canadians, on average, and sustain a disproportionate share of the burden of physical disease and mental illness. However, few studies have assessed poverty as a confounding factor. Future research priorities in native health are best determined by native people themselves.
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1581-38956835
PubMed ID
8956834 View in PubMed
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3231 records – page 1 of 324.