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229 records – page 1 of 23.

A 6-month, randomized, double-masked comparison of latanoprost with timolol in patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212248
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Apr;74(2):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
B. Friström
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Apr;74(2):140-4
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - drug therapy - physiopathology
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Ocular Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology
Ophthalmic Solutions
Prostaglandins F, Synthetic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Safety
Scandinavia
Timolol - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
The intraocular pressure reducing effect and side-effects of latanoprost, a phenyl-substituted prostaglandin analogue, were compared with those of timolol, in a group of 31 glaucomatous or ocular hypertensive patients, divided into three subgroups. The study was randomized and double masked. At the end of 6 month's treatment with latanoprost 0.005% once daily, either as a morning dose or as an evening dose, there was a reduction in intraocular pressure of 33% (p
PubMed ID
8739678 View in PubMed
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Additive effect of dorzolamide on aqueous humor flow in patients receiving long-term treatment with timolol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10777
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Nov;116(11):1438-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
L L Wayman
L I Larsson
T L Maus
R F Brubaker
Author Affiliation
Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minn., USA.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Nov;116(11):1438-40
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Aged
Aqueous Humor - secretion
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Fluorophotometry
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Intraocular Pressure
Male
Middle Aged
Ocular Hypertension - drug therapy - metabolism
Ophthalmic Solutions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sulfonamides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Thiophenes - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Timolol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Tonometry, Ocular
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the additive effect on aqueous humor flow of short-term dorzolamide treatment in patients with glaucoma receiving long-term treatment with timolol. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with glaucoma, 19 at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, and 20 at the University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden, who had been receiving timolol treatment in both eyes for at least 1 year were studied. Aqueous flow was measured with fluorophotometry and intraocular pressure with tonometry. The effect of dorzolamide was compared with placebo when added to the long-term treatment regimen with timolol. RESULTS: Dorzolamide reduced aqueous humor flow by 24% +/- 11% (mean +/- SD). The intraocular pressure as compared with placebo in the US cohort was reduced by 10% +/- 6% and in the Swedish cohort by 18% +/- 9%. CONCLUSIONS: Dorzolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has additive effects as an ocular hypotensive agent with timolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, even though both drugs are suppressors of aqueous humor flow. Dorzolamide's effect on flow in these patients is the same as reported previously in normal subjects who are not taking a beta-adrenergic antagonist.
PubMed ID
9823342 View in PubMed
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After-cataract and secondary glaucoma in the aphakic infant rabbit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50851
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Sep;26(9):1398-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
U. Kugelberg
A. Lundvall
B. Lundgren
J B Holmén
C. Zetterström
Author Affiliation
St Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. ulla.kugelberg@ophste.hs.sll.se
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Sep;26(9):1398-402
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Anterior Chamber
Aphakia, Postcataract - complications
Cataract - etiology - pathology
Comparative Study
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage
Glaucoma - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage
Injections
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Lens Capsule, Crystalline - pathology
Phacoemulsification - adverse effects
Postoperative Complications - pathology
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the association between after-cataract and secondary glaucoma after lensectomy and 5-fluorouracil treatment in an experimental infant rabbit model. SETTING: St Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. METHODS: Lensectomy was performed in both eyes of 16 3-week-old rabbits. One randomly selected eye in each rabbit was injected with 2.5 mg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at surgery and 5.0 mg the day after surgery to reduce the formation of after-cataract. Axial length, corneal thickness, corneal diameter, and intraocular pressure were measured preoperatively and 4 times during the 6 months following surgery. Six months after surgery, the wet weight of the after-cataract was determined. RESULTS: In 16 aphakic eyes treated with 5-FU, no or a minimal amount (0.10 g); 8 of these developed glaucoma. The other 6 eyes had no or minimal after-cataract and did not develop secondary glaucoma. The relationship between after-cataract and secondary glaucoma was statistically significant. CONCLUSION: A significant relationship between the amount of after-cataract and the development of secondary glaucoma was found in aphakic infant rabbit eyes.
PubMed ID
11020626 View in PubMed
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Age related optic nerve axonal loss in adult Brown Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50568
Source
Exp Eye Res. 2005 Jun;80(6):877-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
William O Cepurna
Robert J Kayton
Elaine C Johnson
John C Morrison
Author Affiliation
The Kenneth C. Swan Ocular Neurobiology Laboratory, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, 3375 SW Terwilliger Boulevard, Portland, OR 97239, USA.
Source
Exp Eye Res. 2005 Jun;80(6):877-84
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Axons - physiology
Cell Count
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Microscopy, Electron - methods
Nerve Degeneration - pathology - physiopathology
Neuroglia - physiology
Optic Nerve - pathology - physiopathology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
The effect of age on the number and morphology of optic nerve axons in adult Brown Norway rats (5-31 months old) (n=29) was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By manually counting every axon in areas representing 60% of the optic nerve cross-section, we found a significant negative correlation between age and axon count (R(2)=0.18, P
PubMed ID
15939045 View in PubMed
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Anatomical and visual outcomes of macular hole surgery with short-duration 3-day face-down positioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126428
Source
Retina. 2012 Mar;32(3):506-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
David R P Almeida
Jonathon Wong
Michel Belliveau
Jaspreet Rayat
Jeffrey Gale
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. dalmeida@evolation-medical.com
Source
Retina. 2012 Mar;32(3):506-10
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cataract Extraction
Face
Female
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care - methods
Postoperative Complications
Prone Position
Prospective Studies
Retinal Perforations - surgery
Visual Acuity - physiology
Vitrectomy - adverse effects - methods
Abstract
The role of face-down posturing after macular hole (MH) surgery remains unclear and controversial. We evaluated the anatomical and visual outcomes of MH repair using a short duration (3 days) of prone positioning.
Prospective series of 50 consecutive eyes in 50 patients with Stage 2 or Stage 3 idiopathic MHs. All eyes underwent vitrectomy MH surgery with internal limiting membrane peeling and 20% sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas tamponade. The procedure was combined with phacoemulsification cataract surgery in phakic eyes. Surgical outcomes, MH closure rates, complications, and postoperative visual acuity were investigated.
Anatomical closure of MHs was achieved in 49 (98%) of 50 eyes by 1 surgery. Postoperative logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity decreased (i.e., improved) by 0.271 (95% confidence interval, 0.101-0.441 [P = 0.0024]). One complication of intraocular lens pupillary capture and one case of chronic cystoid macular edema were observed. There were no complications attributed to intraocular pressure fluctuations.
Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and gas tamponade with SF6 followed by short-duration 3-day face-down positioning is a successful surgical intervention for Stage 2 and Stage 3 idiopathic MHs. This method possessed minimal complications and offered significant improvement in visual acuity.
PubMed ID
22392092 View in PubMed
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Anterior chamber depth and primary angle-closure glaucoma. I. An epidemiologic study in Greenland Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5464
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1975 Mar;53(1):89-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975

Anterior chamber depth in Greenland Eskimos. I. A population study of variation with age and sex.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5471
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1974;52(4):551-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

Antihypertensive Medication Postpones the Onset of Glaucoma: Evidence From a Nationwide Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284925
Source
Hypertension. 2017 Feb;69(2):202-210
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Anna Horwitz
Marc Klemp
Jørgen Jeppesen
James C Tsai
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Miriam Kolko
Source
Hypertension. 2017 Feb;69(2):202-210
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Glaucoma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intraocular Pressure - drug effects
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the impact of antihypertensive medication on the onset of glaucoma. Data from the complete Danish population between 40 and 95 years of age were used in the period from 1996 to 2012, covering >2.6 million individuals. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for glaucoma medication and antihypertensive drugs. We first investigated basic correlations in the data and found that patients treated with antihypertensive medication, at any time during the study period, had a significantly higher overall relative risk (RR) of glaucoma, even when controlling for age and sex (with a RR of 1.31 and P
PubMed ID
27920127 View in PubMed
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Aspects of the epidemiology of chronic glaucoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245135
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Suppl. 1981;(146):1-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981

Association between mean intraocular pressure, disease stability and cost of treating glaucoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178719
Source
Curr Med Res Opin. 2004 Aug;20(8):1245-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Colin Vicente
John Walker
Yvonne Buys
Thomas R Einarson
David Covert
Michael Iskedjian
Author Affiliation
PharmIdeas Research and Consulting Inc., Oakville, ON, Canada.
Source
Curr Med Res Opin. 2004 Aug;20(8):1245-51
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disease Progression
Female
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - economics - physiopathology - therapy
Health Care Costs
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
A retrospective analysis determined the association between intraocular pressure (IOP) control levels (mean and last IOP) and disease stability, and the association between IOP and yearly treatment cost in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG).
Data were collected from POAG patients, referred to a tertiary glaucoma clinic. All IOP measurements, visual field mean deviation (VF) scores, physicians' impressions, and resources used (physician visits, procedures, and medications) were recorded and costed using standard resource unit cost lists from the Ministry of Health's perspective. Patients were categorized by the average VF score of their first three visits [mild ( or = 5 dB to or = 12 dB)]. Pearson's r quantified the association between IOP control levels and stability, where stability was defined by the physician's subjective impression of the patient's disease. Spearman's rho was determined to quantify association between mean IOP and yearly treatment cost within VF categories.
Four hundred and eleven charts were reviewed of which 265 were acceptable for analysis. A negative relationship was determined between the probability of reaching stability and mean IOP in all three VF severity groups. Pearson's r was -0.68 (p
PubMed ID
15324527 View in PubMed
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229 records – page 1 of 23.