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23 records – page 1 of 3.

[An outbreak of acute intestinal infections in a children's home].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203862
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Sep-Oct;(5):120-1
Publication Type
Article

Campylobacter coli - an important foodborne pathogen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184580
Source
J Infect. 2003 Jul;47(1):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
C C Tam
S J O'Brien
G K Adak
S M Meakins
J A Frost
Author Affiliation
Gastrointestinal Diseases Division, Public Health Laboratory Service, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, 61 Colindale Avenue, NW9 5EQ, London, UK. clarence.tam@phls.org.uk
Source
J Infect. 2003 Jul;47(1):28-32
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Campylobacter coli - isolation & purification
England - epidemiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Campylobacters are the most common bacterial cause of infectious intestinal disease (IID) in temperate countries. C. jejuni is the predominant cause of campylobacter IID, but the impact of other, less prevalent species has largely been ignored. Here, we present estimates of the burden of indigenously acquired foodborne disease (IFD) due to Campylobacter coli, the second most common cause of human campylobacteriosis.
Data from surveillance sources and specific epidemiologic studies were used to calculate the number of illnesses, presentations to general practice (GP), hospital admissions, hospital occupancy and deaths due to indigenous foodborne C. coli IID in England and Wales for the year 2000.
We estimate that in the year 2000, C. coli accounted for over 25,000 cases of IFD. This organism was responsible for more than 12,000 presentations to GP, 1000 hospital admissions, nearly 4000 bed days of hospital occupancy and 11 deaths. The cost to patients and the National Health Service was estimated at nearly pound 4 million.
Although C. coli comprises a minority of human campylobacter disease, its health burden is considerable and greater than previously thought. Targeted research on this organism is required for its successful control.
PubMed ID
12850159 View in PubMed
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[Characteristic of gut microorganisms abnormalities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143587
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):99-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kh Kh Batchaev
V I Arapova
T D Pilipenko
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):99-101
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Intestine, Large - microbiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Abstract
To study dynamics of qualitative and quantitative changes of microflora of large intestine in different age groups.
Stool samples from children of different age groups (0 - 6 months, 6 months - 1 year, 1 - 7 years, 7 - 14 years, >14 years) were tested on dysbiosis.
Majority of patients admitted during the period of 1999 - 2008 were children 1 - 7 years old (32 - 38%). The highest rate of dysbiosis was observed in infants (92 - 100%). Leading place in pathology of microbiota of large intestine during all study period belonged to Staphylococcus aureus and hemolytic Escherichia coli.
In Karachaevo-Cherkessk republic tightening of measures for surveillance on infection control regime in health-care organizations as well as on carriage of S. aureus in health-care workers are needed.
PubMed ID
20465010 View in PubMed
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[Clinical epidemilogical and laboratory characteristics of Escherichia 0124 infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253542
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1974 May;5(0):48-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1974

[Effect of sanitary and hygienic conditions of populated placed on the incidence of intestinal diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215662
Source
Gig Sanit. 1995 Mar-Apr;(2):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Aleshnia
S V Golovina
P V Zhuravlev
A A Tsatska
N F Byvailov
A A Glukhov
O L Kovalevskaia
A I Kiselev
G A Martynov
E I Shcheglova
Source
Gig Sanit. 1995 Mar-Apr;(2):6-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Hygiene
Incidence
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Russia
Sanitation
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution - adverse effects
Water supply
Abstract
Data on the relationship between the incidence of intestinal infections, including hepatitis A, and communal conditions of settlements and quality of drinking water are presented.
PubMed ID
7789839 View in PubMed
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[Emergency situations in the Republic of Ingushetia and the prevention of their epidemiological consequences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182056
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):112-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
I D Aushev
G G Onishchenko
Z D Getogazova
A Kh Mogushkova
Author Affiliation
Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance in the Republic of Ingushetia, Nazran.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):112-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Disasters
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Government Agencies - organization & administration
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Refugees
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sanitation - standards
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
Information on the sanitary and epidemiological situation and water supply in the Republic of Ingushetia during the period before and after the emergency situation (high flood) is presented. The results of epidemiological observations on the territory of the Republic of Ingushetia for the period of June 22 to the end of the year 2002 indicate that no considerable rise in infectious morbidity, as well as outbreaks of natural focal infections, was noted. This suggests that, in spite of the complicated sanitary and epidemiological situation before the emergency situation (due to the vicinity of the conflict in the Chechen Republic, the intensive migration of the population and the presence of a large of refugees on the territory of the Republic of Ingushetia) and its sharp deterioration caused by the high flood, the timely realization of a complex of sanitary and prophylactic measures made it possible to avoid the wide spread of infectious diseases.
PubMed ID
14716997 View in PubMed
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Human intestinal spirochetosis: Brachyspira aalborgi and/or Brachyspira pilosicoli?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7421
Source
Anim Health Res Rev. 2001 Jun;2(1):101-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
A S Mikosza
D J Hampson
Author Affiliation
Division of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Western Australia, Australia.
Source
Anim Health Res Rev. 2001 Jun;2(1):101-10
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Bacterial Adhesion
Colon - microbiology
Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Prevalence
Rectum - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serpulina - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Spirochaetales Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Intestinal spirochetosis in humans (HIS) is a condition defined by the presence of a layer of spirochetes attached by one cell end to the colorectal epithelium. The pathologic significance of HIS is uncertain, but it has been linked to chronic diarrhea and other abdominal complaints. Two anaerobic intestinal spirochete species have been associated with HIS, namely Brachyspira pilosicoli and Brachyspira aalborgi. Brachyspira pilosicoli, which colonizes many animal species, is common (approximately 30%) in the feces of people from developing countries, including Australian Aborigines, and in HIV+ patients and male homosexuals in Western societies. It is also commonly seen attached to the rectal mucosa of homosexual males. In other groups in Western societies both the presence of B. pilosicoli in feces and histologic HIS are uncommon (approximately 1.5%). Brachyspira aalborgi is an extremely slow growing and fastidious spirochete, which previously had been isolated from an HIS patient in Denmark. Recent studies using polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA from intestinal biopsies from a series of cases of HIS in the general Western population demonstrated that B. aalborgi, rather than B. pilosicoli, was the main spirochete species involved in these patients. This review outlines recent developments in the study of HIS and the two spirochete species, and identifies priorities for future research.
PubMed ID
11708739 View in PubMed
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[Intestinal dysbacteriosis in different age groups of residents of Kemerovo].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195466
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2001 Jan-Feb;(1):69-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Levanova
E V Surikova
Author Affiliation
State Medical Academy, Kemerovo, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2001 Jan-Feb;(1):69-71
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Intestines - microbiology
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The state of microflora of the large intestine in 877 persons of different age groups in Kemerovo was studied. The study revealed that intestinal dysbacteriolysis of various degrees of severity was rather widely spread among the residents of the city. The main groups of risk, found to comprise young children, adolescents and people above 60 years of age, were established.
PubMed ID
11236510 View in PubMed
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Intestinal parasites and bacteria in Aboriginal children in South West Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239206
Source
Aust Paediatr J. 1985 Feb;21(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
J S Gill
H I Jones
Source
Aust Paediatr J. 1985 Feb;21(1):45-9
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Body Weight
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Campylobacter fetus
Child
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - microbiology - parasitology
Feces - microbiology - parasitology
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Hymenolepiasis - complications - epidemiology
Infant
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - epidemiology - parasitology
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Otitis Media - complications
Abstract
In a study of intestinal parasites in 697 Aboriginal children under the age of 6 years in South-west Australia, Giardia lamblia was recorded in 26% and Hymenolepis nana in 13.9%. G. lamblia infections occurred above 4 months of age, and H. nana infections above 18 months of age. There was a close correlation between infection with these two species (chi 2, P less than 0.001). Campylobacter jejuni, the predominant bacterial species recorded, was isolated in 2.3%, and was related to bowel symptoms in one child. G. lamblia was more prevalent in the country areas than in the Perth metropolitan area (chi 2, P less than 0.05. H. nana was more prevalent in children whose weight was below the third percentile (chi 2, P less than 0.02), and in those with diarrhoea (chi 2, P less than 0.01). There were strong correlations between low weight (below third percentile), a history of recent diarrhoea, and discharging ears.
PubMed ID
3977790 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.