Skip header and navigation

Refine By

152 records – page 1 of 16.

1989 Canadian guidelines for health care providers for the examination of children suspected to have been sexually abused.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230870
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 May;15 Suppl 3:1-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989

Able to choose? Women's thoughts and experiences regarding informed choices during birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310264
Source
Midwifery. 2019 Oct; 77:123-129
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Hilde Bringedal
Ingvild Aune
Author Affiliation
Women and Children Center, St.Olavs Hospital, Olav Kyrres gate 11, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: hilde.bringedal@stolav.no.
Source
Midwifery. 2019 Oct; 77:123-129
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Decision Making, Shared
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Norway
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To gain a deeper understanding of women's thoughts and experiences regarding informed choices during childbirth.
A qualitative approach with individual in-depth interviews was chosen for data collection. Ten women were interviewed three to four weeks after the birth of their first child. The transcribed interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation.
Two main themes emerged based on the analysis: "women's resources and coping abilities" and "women's abilities to make informed choices during birth". Women's resources and coping abilities influenced how they retrieved information and made their own choices. Their abilities to make informed choices during birth were influenced by the course of the birth process and the fact that they were patients and submitted to the hospitals' routines.
Instead of using the term "informed choice", women in this study discussed involvement, participation and being heard and seen as individuals. How receptive women are to information during birth varies, and midwives play an important role during pregnancy in informing and encouraging them. The relationship between women and midwives influences women's abilities to make informed choices during birth. Women need individual care and should be encouraged to have realistic expectations and to gain knowledge and confidence in their ability to give birth. A model of care in which women experience greater continuity will have an impact on their expectations, decision-making and experience of birth.
PubMed ID
31323487 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admission and optometry grade comparisons among students receiving different types of admission interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219228
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 1994 Jan;71(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
M M Spafford
Author Affiliation
School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 1994 Jan;71(1):47-52
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Educational Measurement
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Optometry - education
Retrospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Students, Health Occupations
Abstract
This retrospective study examined the interview scores, admission grades, and optometry grades of students who received one of two types of admission interviews. The INDIV-BLIND group (N = 36) represented those students who had received an individual interview (i.e., one interviewer) for which the interviewer had no access to the candidate's file. The PANEL-ACCESS group (N = 21) was made up of those students who had received a panel interview (i.e., two interviewers) for which the interviewers had access to the candidate's file. The two groups were compared using two admission grades and seven optometry grades. Both t-test and Wilcoxon Score statistical procedures were used to test the null hypothesis (H0) that there were no significant grade differences (p
PubMed ID
8145998 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advantages and limitations of web-based surveys: evidence from a child mental health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147314
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;46(1):69-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Einar Heiervang
Robert Goodman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Unifob Health, Bergen, Norway. Einar.Heiervang@rbup.uib.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;46(1):69-76
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies - economics - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys - economics - methods - standards
Humans
Internet - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards - utilization
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires - economics - standards
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Web-based surveys may have advantages related to the speed and cost of data collection as well as data quality. However, they may be biased by low and selective participation. We predicted that such biases would distort point-estimates such as average symptom level or prevalence but not patterns of associations with putative risk-factors.
A structured psychiatric interview was administered to parents in two successive surveys of child mental health. In 2003, parents were interviewed face-to-face, whereas in 2006 they completed the interview online. In both surveys, interviews were preceded by paper questionnaires covering child and family characteristics.
The rate of parents logging onto the web site was comparable to the response rate for face-to-face interviews, but the rate of full response (completing all sections of the interview) was much lower for web-based interviews. Full response was less frequent for non-traditional families, immigrant parents, and less educated parents. Participation bias affected point estimates of psychopathology but had little effect on associations with putative risk factors. The time and cost of full web-based interviews was only a quarter of that for face-to-face interviews.
Web-based surveys may be performed faster and at lower cost than more traditional approaches with personal interviews. Selective participation seems a particular threat to point estimates of psychopathology, while patterns of associations are more robust.
PubMed ID
19921078 View in PubMed
Less detail

All that I need exists within me: A qualitative study of nulliparous Norwegian women's experiences with planned home birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306502
Source
Midwifery. 2020 Jul; 86:102705
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2020
Author
Tuva Falch Skrondal
Trine Bache-Gabrielsen
Ingvild Aune
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, ABC, Kirkeveien 166, 0450 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: tuva_falk@hotmail.com.
Source
Midwifery. 2020 Jul; 86:102705
Date
Jul-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Home Childbirth - psychology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Norway
Parity
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to gain knowledge regarding how Norwegian nulliparous women experience planned home birth and why they choose this route of giving birth.
A qualitative approach was used, and the study data were derived from semi-structured individual interviews, which were analysed through systematic text condensation.
Ten Norwegian women aged nineteen to thirty-nine years were interviewed. They had each gone through with a successful planned home birth of their first child within the last two years. These women all resided in the middle, western and eastern areas of Norway. A certified midwife was present throughout the labour and birth, and no transfer to the hospital was necessary.
The following two main themes were identified: 'inner motivation' and 'giving birth in safe surroundings'. The women in this study had a strong inner faith in the normal physiological processes of labour and birth and had educated and prepared themselves carefully for their planned home birth. To be able to enter one's own inner world was considered crucial for labour, and the trusting relationship they had with their midwife made this possible.
Planned home birth may be experienced as a very positive occurrence for nulliparous women, and the care those women in this study received contained several elements that can help to promote normal labour and birth at a time in which reducing interventions in maternity care is of importance. Their positive birth experiences gave the women confidence both in their transition to motherhood as well as in other aspects of life.
PubMed ID
32200282 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ambivalence of losing weight after bariatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256833
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22876
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christine Warholm
Aud Marie Øien
Målfrid Råheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; warstine@hotmail.com.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22876
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
This study is grounded in a phenomenological lifeworld perspective. It aims at providing rich descriptions of lived experience of the process of losing weight after obesity surgery. Two women participated in in-depth interviews four times each during the first postoperative year. Based on the women's experiences, a meaning structure--the ambivalence of losing weight after obesity surgery--was identified across the women's processes of change. This consisted of five core themes: movement and activity--freedom but new demands and old restraints; eating habits and digestion--the complexity of change; appearance--smaller, but looser; social relations--stability and change; and being oneself--vulnerability and self-assurance. These core themes changed over time in terms of dominance. The experience of ambivalence is discussed according to a phenomenological perspective of the body as lived experience.
Notes
Cites: Obes Surg. 2003 Oct;13(5):706-1314627464
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-811513933
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Apr 5;142(7):547-5915809466
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2005 Sep;46(3):244-5916259147
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 May;62(10):2445-5716289735
Cites: Obes Surg. 2006 Jun;16(6):787-9416756745
Cites: Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2005 May-Jun;1(3):371-8116925250
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2006 Oct 15;28(19):1211-2017005482
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Sep;14(9):1626-3617030974
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2006 Nov 7;12(41):6602-717075971
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Jan 4;127(1):34-717205087
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Jan 4;127(1):38-4217205088
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Apr;31(4):569-7717325689
Cites: Int J Psychiatry Med. 2007;37(1):69-7917645199
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Aug;31(8):1248-6117356530
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8):741-5217715408
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:26917903273
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Feb 28;128(5):559-6218311198
Cites: Obes Surg. 2008 Dec;18(12):1622-418941845
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Aug;76(2):254-919157764
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1504-1619805812
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Oct 4;131(19):1887-9221984294
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2013 Jan;23(1):66-7723166152
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):795-80523221918
Cites: Med Health Care Philos. 2013 Aug;16(3):507-2322395970
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2013 Sep;23(9):1202-1423921810
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2001 Jul;11(4):522-3711521609
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2014 May;70(5):1138-4924131222
Cites: Obes Res. 2001 Dec;9(12):788-80511743063
Cites: Obes Surg. 2002 Dec;12(6):781-812568182
Cites: Fam Pract. 1993 Jun;10(2):201-68359612
PubMed ID
24480033 View in PubMed
Less detail

An interview technique for recording work postures in epidemiological studies. Music-Norrtälje Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212773
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):171-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
C. Wiktorin
K. Selin
L. Ekenvall
L. Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):171-80
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Human Engineering
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Posture
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to present and evaluate a work-task-oriented interview technique focusing on the placement of the hands relative to the body and assessing per cent time spent in five standard work postures during a working day.
The reproducibility of estimated time spent in each work posture was tested by the test-retest method in 32 subjects; 16 were interviewed by the same interviewer and 16 were interviewed by another one at the retest. The validity concerning estimated time spent in th five standard work postures was tested in relation to observations in 58 male blue-collar workers. The mean registration (assessment) time was 6 hours and 15 minutes.
No evident differences in the reproducibility depending on same or different interviewers at test and retest could be observed. The linear relationship between times estimated by the interview and by observations was high for four of the work postures: 'sitting' (r = 0.86), 'standing with hands above shoulder level' (r = 0.87), 'between shoulder and knuckle level' (r = 0.75), and 'below knuckle level' (r = 0.93). When the work posture 'standing with hands between shoulder and knuckle level' was divided into 'hands fixed' (r = 0.62) and 'hands not fixed' (r = 0.50) the correlations were weak. Current musculoskeletal complaints did not influence the accuracy of the estimations.
The present task-oriented interview technique may be the best available method to estimate these work postures in a way that requires few resources compared to observations and technical measurements.
PubMed ID
8666487 View in PubMed
Less detail

An introductory letter in advance of a telephone survey may increase response rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179239
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2004 Jul 1;30(13):121-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2004
Author
S E Majowicz
V L Edge
J. Flint
P. Sockett
K. Doré
L. McDougall
V. Remple
M. Fyfe
S. Henson
K. Gaebel
Author Affiliation
Foodborne, Waterborne, and Zoonotic Infections Division, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2004 Jul 1;30(13):121-3
Date
Jul-1-2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
British Columbia
Correspondence as Topic
Data Collection - methods
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Reminder Systems
Research Design
Rural Population
Telephone
Urban Population
PubMed ID
15248524 View in PubMed
Less detail

An overview of the medical school admission process and use of applicant data in decision making: what has changed since the 1980s?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115265
Source
Acad Med. 2013 May;88(5):672-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Alicia Monroe
Erin Quinn
Wayne Samuelson
Dana M Dunleavy
Keith W Dowd
Author Affiliation
Educational Affairs, University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida, USA.
Source
Acad Med. 2013 May;88(5):672-81
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
College Admission Test
Correspondence as Topic
Curriculum - trends
Decision Making
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods - trends
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods - utilization
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data - trends
Schools, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data - trends
United States
Abstract
To investigate current medical school admission processes and whether they differ from those in 1986 when they were last reviewed by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).
In spring 2008, admission deans from all MD-granting U.S. and Canadian medical schools using the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) were invited to complete an online survey that asked participants to describe their institution's admission process and to report the use and rate the importance of applicant data in making decisions at each stage.
The 120 responding admission officers reported using a variety of data to make decisions. Most indicated using interviews to assess applicants' personal characteristics. Compared with 1986, there was an increase in the emphasis placed on academic data during pre-interview screening. While GPA data were among the most important data in decision making at all stages in 1986, data use and importance varied by the stage of the process in 2008: MCAT scores and undergraduate GPAs were rated as the most important data for deciding whom to invite to submit secondary applications and interview, whereas interview recommendations and letters of recommendation were rated as the most important data in deciding whom to accept.
This study underscores the complexity of the medical school admission process and suggests increased use of a holistic approach that considers the whole applicant when making admission decisions. Findings will inform AAMC initiatives focused on transforming admission processes.
PubMed ID
23524917 View in PubMed
Less detail

The appropriateness of referrals to a pediatric emergency department via a telephone health line.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152168
Source
CJEM. 2009 Mar;11(2):139-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Tawfik Al-Abdullah
Amy C Plint
Alyson Shaw
Rhonda Correll
Isabelle Gaboury
Carrol Pitters
Anna Bottaglia
Tammy Clifford
Author Affiliation
Emergency Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
Source
CJEM. 2009 Mar;11(2):139-48
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hotlines - standards
Humans
Infant
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric - standards
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards
Male
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Abstract
We compared the appropriateness of visits to a pediatric emergency department (ED) by provincial telephone health line-referral, by self- or parent-referral, and by physician-referral.
A cohort of patients younger than 18 years of age who presented to a pediatric ED during any of four 1-week study periods were prospectively enrolled. The cohort consisted of all patients who were referred to the ED by a provincial telephone health line or by a physician. For each patient referred by the health line, the next patient who was self- or parent-referred was also enrolled. The primary outcome was visit appropriateness, which was determined using previously published explicit criteria. Secondary outcomes included the treating physician's view of appropriateness, disposition (hospital admission or discharge), treatment, investigations and the length of stay in the ED.
Of the 578 patients who were enrolled, 129 were referred from the health line, 102 were either self- or parent-referred, and 347 were physician-referred. Groups were similar at baseline for sex, but health line-referred patients were significantly younger. Using explicitly set criteria, there was no significant difference in visit appropriateness among the health line-referrals (66%), the self- or parent-referrals (77%) and the physician-referrals (73%) (p = 0.11). However, when the examining physician determined visit appropriateness, physician-referred patients (80%) were deemed appropriate significantly more often than those referred by the health line (56%, p
PubMed ID
19272215 View in PubMed
Less detail

152 records – page 1 of 16.