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3473 records – page 1 of 348.

Occupational Case Analysis Interview and Rating Scale. An examination of construct validity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190033
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(4):267-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
J S Lai
L. Haglund
G. Kielhofner
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Human Development Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(4):267-73
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Occupations
Sweden
Abstract
The Occupational Case Analysis Interview and Rating Scale (OCAIRS) was developed based on the Model of Human Occupation with the intention of assessing patients' occupational adaptation. Several studies examining the quality of this instrument have been completed; however, none have discussed the internal validity of the instrument or the appropriateness of the rating scale. The purpose of this study is to validate the internal validity of the OCAIRS and to test the quality of the rating scale. The results indicate that the OCAIRS is a valid measure of occupational adaptation. Each item was shown to have its own rating scale structure, however, all items together still shared the same five-point rating scale.
PubMed ID
12032924 View in PubMed
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Seeking health care through international medical tourism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115584
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2013 Jun;45(2):177-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Lee Ann Eissler
John Casken
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing & Dental Hygiene, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. eissler@hawaii.edu
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2013 Jun;45(2):177-84
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Medical Tourism
Travel
Abstract
The purpose of this study was the exploration of international travel experiences for the purpose of medical or dental care from the perspective of patients from Alaska and to develop insight and understanding of the essence of the phenomenon of medical tourism.
The study is conceptually oriented within a model of health-seeking behavior. Using a qualitative design, 15 Alaska medical tourists were individually interviewed. The data were analyzed using a hermeneutic process of inquiry to uncover the meaning of the experience.
Six themes reflecting the experiences of Alaska medical tourists emerged: "my motivation," "I did the research," "the medical care I need," "follow-up care," "the advice I give," and "in the future." Subthemes further categorized data for increased understanding of the phenomenon. The thematic analysis provides insight into the experience and reflects a modern approach to health-seeking behavior through international medical tourism.
The results of this study provide increased understanding of the experience of obtaining health care internationally from the patient perspective. Improved understanding of medical tourism provides additional information about a contemporary approach to health-seeking behavior.
Results of this study will aid nursing professionals in counseling regarding medical tourism options and providing follow-up health care after medical tourism. Nurses will be able to actively participate in global health policy discussions regarding medical tourism trends.
PubMed ID
23489601 View in PubMed
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Validity of occupational histories obtained by interview with female workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227082
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1991;19(4):523-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C. Brisson
M. Vézina
P M Bernard
S. Gingras
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Laval University, Québec, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1991;19(4):523-30
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
This study measured the validity of work histories obtained by interview with 84 female workers and examined specific factors which influence such validity. This is the first validation of work histories collected by interviews with women. The validity of each interview was assessed over a period of 29 years, from 1955 to 1983. The information provided by the worker was compared annually to job information registered in public and union records. On the average, interviews yielded the correct information (either employer's name or nonworking year) for 81% of the person years of these subjects. However, there was a time effect; the average validity score for recent employment (1972-1983) was 89%, while that for employment in the more distant past (1955-1971) was 74%. Furthermore, workers who had fewer jobs, had longer durations of employment, and were non-French speaking had higher validity scores. Most of these findings are consistent with previous studies conducted among male respondents.
PubMed ID
2035550 View in PubMed
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Welcome intrusions: an interpretive phenomenological study of TB nurses' relational work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134308
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 Nov;48(11):1409-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Amy Bender
Elizabeth Peter
Francine Wynn
Gavin Andrews
Dorothy Pringle
Author Affiliation
Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1P8, Canada. amy.bender@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 Nov;48(11):1409-19
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Public health nursing
Tuberculosis - nursing
Abstract
Nurse-client relationships are valued in descriptions of public health practice and require consideration as work involving knowledge, skill, and personal engagement. Even so, in public health, they are largely taken-for-granted, particularly in the area of tuberculosis (TB). Instead, TB nursing is often structured by a population focus, which at times challenges individually focused relationship ideals.
This paper describes an interpretive phenomenological study which was undertaken to understand the nature of TB nurses' relational work.
Data were collected over an eight month period through observations of usual nurse-client visits and semi-structured interviews.
The study took place in the TB program of a public health department of a large multicultural Canadian city with nine nurses and 24 clients.
The phrase 'welcome intrusions' represents the nature of relational work and along with three key themes, 'getting through the door', 'doing TB but more than that', and 'beyond a professional', speaks to the central tension in this relational work: balancing its dual surveillance-care focus.
Together these themes emphasize the importance of nurses' skill of involvement in two key domains of TB nursing practice: providing comfort and being watchful.
PubMed ID
21601205 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Aug 9;127(15):1921
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-9-2007
Author
Elisabeth Swensen
Author Affiliation
elswense@online.no.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Aug 9;127(15):1921
Date
Aug-9-2007
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Knowledge
Norway
Periodicals as Topic
Physicians
PubMed ID
17700728 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Randall Sexton
Ellen Anne Buljo Stabbursvik
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, P.O. Box 6124, 9291, Tromsø, Norway. randallno@yahoo.com
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Population Groups
Shamanism
Abstract
There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today's tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today's changing global society.
Notes
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;45(7):607-1611056823
Cites: Am Psychol. 2002 Nov;57(11):962-7812564209
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):488-9720044966
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;42(2):295-31616114587
Cites: Eur J Hum Genet. 2007 Jan;15(1):115-2016985502
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2003 Jun;40(2):248-7712940648
PubMed ID
20862528 View in PubMed
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The development of environmental visions and strategies at the municipal level: Case studies from the county of Östergötland in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282148
Source
J Environ Manage. 2016 Sep 01;179:76-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-01-2016
Author
E. Weddfelt
M. Vaccari
T. Tudor
Source
J Environ Manage. 2016 Sep 01;179:76-82
Date
Sep-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Decision Making
Environmental Policy
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden faces a number of environmental challenges. Municipalities can play an important role in managing these challenges. Using interviews with 13 municipalities in the county of Östergötland, the manner via which environmental visions and strategies were developed and implemented, and the challenges were explored. Differences were found in the effective development and implementation of both environmental visions and strategies due to a range of factors including the range and level of involvement of different stakeholders, variation in what constituted an environmental strategy, and the time horizons employed for the visions. Suggestions for how best to overcome the barriers are outlined.
PubMed ID
27179342 View in PubMed
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Model of care and pattern of nursing practice in ambulatory oncology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114456
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2013;23(1):19-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Charlotte T Lee
Barbara Fitzgerald
Author Affiliation
University of California, Irvine, 252C Berk Hall, Irvine, CA, 92697-3959, USA. charlotte.lee@uci.edu
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2013;23(1):19-27
Date
2013
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Canada
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, organizational
Neoplasms - nursing
Abstract
The worldwide burden of cancer warrants more effective and efficient cancer care management strategies (World Health Organization, 2003). Model of ambulatory care, in particular, has tremendous implications on patient and administrative outcomes (Knight, 2007; Lynch, Marcone & Kagan, 2007; Moore, Johnson, Fortner & Houts, 2008). Nevertheless, little is known about the pattern of practices and the clinic operations in this setting. As part of the hospital's ambulatory redesign program, this survey aims to: a) review and describe existing models of ambulatory care employed by key national and international cancer centres; b) identify models or elements within the models that are appropriate to be adopted for best practice.
Semi-structured interviews with 10 senior management members at 10 centres (N = 10) were conducted. Participants were asked to describe: a) model of ambulatory care employed by their institution (e.g., scope and model of ambulatory nursing practice); and b) strategies used to manage common patient care related issues in their institutions. Interviews were recorded and analyzed according to the objectives of this survey.
A majority of cancer centres employed models of care similar to the existing Hospital model of ambulatory care and are encountering similar challenges in care delivery. Therefore, it was not deemed appropriate to adopt any models from participating centres.
It is crucial for administrators to report and share best practices to ensure high-quality care. The survey of current practice did not yield sufficient data to adequately support the implementation of any specific models at the hospital's ambulatory care settings. Nevertheless, findings from the present review support the principles proposed for the new hospital model of ambulatory care.
PubMed ID
23617216 View in PubMed
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Survey of community-based ontario physicians about laboratory utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196100
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Mar;33(2):139-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
P S Bunting
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Department, Gamma-Dynacare Medical Laboratories, Brampton, Ontario, Canada. buntingp@gamma-dynacare.com
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Mar;33(2):139-42
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Laboratories - utilization
Ontario
Physicians, Family
PubMed ID
10751592 View in PubMed
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Junior faculty experiences with informal mentoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170918
Source
Med Teach. 2005 Dec;27(8):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Karen Leslie
Lorelei Lingard
Sarah Whyte
Author Affiliation
Wilson Centre for Research in Education, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. karen.leslie@sickkids.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2005 Dec;27(8):693-8
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Faculty, Medical
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mentors
Ontario
Pediatrics
Schools, Medical
Abstract
Mentoring is one way in which new faculty can acquire the skills needed for a successful academic career. Little is known about how informal mentoring is operationalized in an academic setting. This study had two main objectives: (1) to determine if junior faculty identify as having an informal mentor(s) and to describe their informal mentoring relationships; and (2) to identify the areas in which these faculty seek career assistance and advice. The study employed a grounded theory approach. Subjects were recruited from the clinical teaching faculty and were 3-7 years into their first faculty position. Theoretical sampling was employed in which data analysis proceeded along-side data collection, and collection ceased when saturation of themes was reached. Saturation was reached at ten subjects. Data were collected by individual interviews. Four topics recurred: qualities sought in mentors, processes by which guidance is obtained, content of the guidance received and barriers. Faculty obtained guidance in two principal ways: (a) through collegial working relationships; and (b) through discussion with senior clinicians as part of the evaluative system in the department. Participants discussed the degree of mentoring they received in the areas of: career focus, orientation to the organization, transition of role from trainee to faculty and work/nonwork balance. Barriers identified included an evaluative role and conflict of interest on the mentor's part. Junior faculty identify some relationships from which they receive guidance; however, limitations in these relationships result in a lack of mentorship on career direction and on balancing career with personal life.
PubMed ID
16451889 View in PubMed
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3473 records – page 1 of 348.