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Family pattern and family care in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2852
Source
Pages 109-112 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Family Pattern and Family Care in Greenland Tine Curtis, Karo Thomsen, and Peter Bjerregaard Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Information on household and family patterns from the 1993-94 Health Interview Survey in
  1 document  
Author
Curtis, T
Thomsen, K
Bjerregaard, P
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 109-112 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Family patterns
Greenland Health Interview Survey
Home nursing - organization & administration
Household surveys
Abstract
Information on household and family patterns from the 1993-94 Health Interview Survey in Greenland is described. The average size of households is 3.5, and almost three-fourths of the Greenlandic population live in families with children. The pattern of these families with children covers a variety of single-parent families (6% of the total Greenlandic population), nuclear families (42%), extended families (14%), and other types of families (11%).
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"I only smoke when I have nothing to do": a qualitative study on how smoking is part of everyday life in a Greenlandic village.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107894
Source
Pages 231-236 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):231-236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
in northern Greenland. Design. An ethnographic field study was carried out in 2010, including participant observation, informal conversation with health professionals and semi-structured interviews with 4 smokers (2 women and 2 men). Data were analysed mth a phenomenological hermeneutic approach
  1 document  
Author
Anne Birgitte Jensen
Lise Hounsgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen Ingrid's Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland. ABJ@peqqik.gl
Source
Pages 231-236 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):231-236
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Behavior
Boredom
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Stigma
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - psychology
Abstract
Smoking-related illnesses, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease and lung cancer, are common in Greenland. Factors such as age, gender, cigarette use, restricted smoking at home and socio-economic determinants are well-known predictors for smoking and smoking cessation. In 2005, 66% of the adult population in were Greenland smokers, despite widespread smoking cessation campaigns. It is therefore imperative to identify the factors that influence the low levels of smoking cessation to be able to offer cessation interventions of high quality.
To develop knowledge about how smoking forms an incorporated part of a social and cultural context in the daily lives of unskilled residents of a small town in northern Greenland.
An ethnographic field study was carried out in 2010, including participant observation, informal conversation with health professionals and semi-structured interviews with 4 smokers (2 women and 2 men). Data were analysed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach.
All informants were daily smokers. During work hours, they smoked fewer cigarettes due to control policy as well as having something to do. At home, they smoke more during leisure time. Having time on one's hands can be a factor in smokers remaining as smokers. It appears that smokers seem to consider themselves to be stigmatised. This may be one reason for wanting to stop smoking. Smokers ask how to quit and also ask for help to give up smoking with regard to medical treatment for withdrawal symptoms. Serious illness and pregnancy both appear to be triggers to consider giving up smoking. Severe withdrawal symptoms and lack of knowledge about how to give up smoking are barriers to participants achieving their goal.
Prevention initiatives should be targeted at all smokers and a smoking cessation service should be developed, where smokers are supervised and receive medical treatment for withdrawal symptoms.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2004 Jun;18(2):145-5315147477
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2009 Mar;16(1):64-7319228305
Cites: Tob Control. 2006 Aug;15(4):280-516885576
PubMed ID
23967409 View in PubMed
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The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote areas of Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107710
Source
Pages 368-375 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):368-375
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
. Design. This ethnographic study utilised documentary analysis, participant observation and qualitative interviewing carried out in remote areas of Greenland during 2011- 2012. Eight registered nurses, four women and four men, aged between 35 and 55, participated in this study. Four were working at
  1 document  
Author
Lise Hounsgaard
Anne Birgitte Jensen
Julie Præst Wilche
Ilone Dolmer
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing and Health Science, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland. lhounsgaard@health.sdu.dk
Source
Pages 368-375 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):368-375
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Female
Greenland
Health Care Reform
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Services - organization & administration
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
The Greenlandic Healthcare Reform (2010) required improved quality of services for health promotion, prevention of infectious and lifestyle diseases, family nursing and evidence-based clinical nursing.
To investigate current nursing practice in Greenland and to identify whether it meets the requirements of healthcare reform.
This ethnographic study utilised documentary analysis, participant observation and qualitative interviewing carried out in remote areas of Greenland during 2011-2012. Eight registered nurses, four women and four men, aged between 35 and 55, participated in this study. Four were working at healthcare centres in towns and four were working at nursing stations in villages. The nurses were educated in Greenland or a Nordic country and had been practicing nursing for at least 2 years in an Arctic region. They were observed for 1-5 days, and subsequently interviewed. Interviews included in-depth questioning, based on emerging outcomes from observation. Interviews were recorded and transcribed; they were analysed within a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.
Nurses in rural and remote areas navigate their health promotion and preventive work with conflict between health strategies and everyday realities, where unpredictable tasks often lead to prioritisation of urgent, acute work. There is interaction between personal and professional skills. Everyday life is characterised by opportunities and challenges in the grey areas, namely nursing, medical and social work.
The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote Greenland is characterised by a high degree of variability and complexity, with a requirement for a wide range of knowledge and skills. Nurses need to be better prepared with regard to acute medical care, preventive care, social work, humanistic approaches and information technology to implement the ideology of health strategies.
Notes
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2009 Mar;16(1):64-7319228305
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2012;12:190923228181
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2004 Jun;18(2):145-5315147477
Cites: Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2007 Dec;11(5):417-2317604694
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Sep 23-30;260(12):1743-83045356
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):86-10015887767
Cites: Can Nurse. 2004 Jun;100(6):27-3115301092
PubMed ID
23984291 View in PubMed
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Population-based study of acute respiratory infections in children, Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6044
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Jun;8(6):586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
  1 website  
Author
Anders Koch
Per Sørensen
Preben Homøe
Kåre Mølbak
Freddy Karup Pedersen
Tine Mortensen
Hanne Elberling
Anne Mette Eriksen
Ove Rosing Olsen
Mads Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. ako@ssi.dk
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Jun;8(6):586-93
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cohort Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Interviews
Inuits
Male
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in Inuit children, in terms of incidence and severity. A cohort of 294 children
PubMed ID
12023914 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Reducing unwanted pregnancies in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63261
Source
Pages 267-269 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
. Participating observations, individual and group interviews. Re- sults. Though there are local variations, many problems are identical in the different communities. The general problems are related to collaboration, sexual supervision, education and mediation, contracep- tive methods, access to contraceptive
  1 document  
Author
Meldgaard, S
Author Affiliation
PAARISA Department of Prevention, Directorate of Health, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 267-269 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Abortion
Condoms - supply & distribution
Contraception
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Sex Education
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: In 2002 the number of births in Greenland was 940 and the number of abortions 821. The Home Rule Government in Greenland and PAARISA, The Department of Health (Ministry of Health) have the goal to reduce the abortion rate in Greenland with 50% within the next 5 years. In spring 2003 an internal campaign was carried out in 8 communities/hospitals: Ittoqqortoormiit, Upernavik, Ilulissat, Aasiaat, Maniitsoq, Paamiut, Narsaq and Qaqortoq. The aim of the campaign was to recognize the problems and wishes for the future effort from the perspective of professionals (health professionals, teachers, preventive workers). STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive analyses of possibilities and barriers among professionals and lay people. METHODS: Participating observations, individual and group interviews. RESULTS: Though there are local variations, many problems are identical in the different communities. The general problems are related to collaboration, sexual supervision, education and mediation, contraceptive methods, access to contraceptive methods and moral standards in communities and the society in general. CONCLUSION: Increased collaboration between professionals, lay people and key persons in the community; improved quality and focus on sexual education; awareness on contraceptive methods used; new strategies in access to (desirable) condoms and increased focus on the problems related to unwanted pregnancies in society.
PubMed ID
15736665 View in PubMed
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The role of hunting in a socioeconomic classification for Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2919
Source
Pages 626-629 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
not directly applicable to Green- land where other factors, such as success as a hunter, participation in community life, and raising chil- dren, also convey status and must be included in a status coding. In the 1993 Greenland Health Interview Survey the participants' hunting activities were
  1 document  
Author
Thomsen, K.
Curtis, T.
Bjerregaard, P.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 626-629 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Greenland Health Interview Survey
Hunting
Indigenous peoples
Occupational classification
Survey methodology
Abstract
The socioeconomic classification used in Western societies is not directly applicable to Greenland where other factors, such as success as a hunter, participation in community life, and raising children, also convey status and must be included in a status coding. In the 1993 Greenland Health Interview Survey the participants' hunting activities were estimated through a number of questions. Nineteen percent of male Greenlanders classified themselves as hunters when asked about their primary occupation, but in another question an additional 10% stated that they relied on hunting for a living. When asked about their job, hunters were confused as to whether hunting was considered a job by the researchers. This uncertainty may explain the difference between the two questions regarding classification of individuals as hunters. For future research it is necessary to develop a socioeconomic status classification which is culturally sensitive and suited to contemporary Greenlandic society.
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Social and cultural factors as determinants of self-rated health in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2918
Source
Pages 622-625 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
, Greenland Abstract: In 1993-94, a countrywide health interview survey was performed in 38 towns and villages throughout Greenland. Information was collected on self-rated health and self-reported disease, social and cultural factors, lifestyle, and living conditions. A total of 1,580 adult Greenlanders
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard, P.
Curtis, T.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 622-625 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Greenland Health Interview Survey
Health status surveys
Indigenous peoples
Sociocultural classification
Survey methodology
Abstract
In 1993-94, a countrywide health interview survey was performed in 38 towns and villages throughout Greenland. Information was collected on self-rated health and self-reported disease, social and cultural factors, lifestyle, and living conditions. A total of 1,580 adult Greenlanders and 148 Danes was interviewed (57% of the sample). Respondents were classified according to ethnic self-identification and job category, but these customary classifications were not satisfactory. An alternative classification according to exposure to traditional Greenlandic hunting culture and Danish culture during childhood was tested. The population fell into three subgroups, each with its own socioeconomic, ethnic, and occupational pattern, and with different health and health behavior. The new classification has distinct advantages as a supplement to the usual classification according to ethnicity and job category. The aim of the present paper is to present a comprehensive health interview survey from Greenland andto discuss some considerations regarding sociocultural classification of the population.
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Three children on one bike: An anthropological study on what children are capable of and what children want

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257697
Source
Page 436 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
participant observation, interviews and observations in our fieldwork. We will take you to the places where we find the children and to places children have shown us through their pictures. In this presentation we would like to show you our pathways. Pictures from our fieldwork will be helpers in the
  1 document  
Author
Thorsen K
Bergenholtz G
Author Affiliation
Greenland Management of Health, Nuuk
Center of Health Education, Nuuk
Source
Page 436 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Children
Greenland
Interviews
Observations
Classifications
Anthropological study
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
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Women's perspectives on illness when being screened for cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107722
Source
Pages 541-547 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):541-547
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
cervical cancer, and the knowledge that they deem necessary to decide whether to participate in cervical cancer screening. Study design. The methods used to perform this research were 2 focus-group interviews with 5 Danish- speaking women and 2 individual interviews with Greenlandic-speaking women. The
  1 document  
Author
Lise Hounsgaard
Mikaela Augustussen
Helle Møller
Stephen K Bradley
Suzanne Møller
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing, and Health Science, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland. lhounsgaard@health.sdu.dk
Source
Pages 541-547 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):541-547
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Greenland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Abstract
In Greenland, the incidence of cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) is 25 per 100,000 women; 2.5 times the Danish rate. In Greenland, the disease is most frequent among women aged 30-40. Systematic screening can identify women with cervical cell changes, which if untreated may cause cervical cancer. In 2007, less than 40% of eligible women in Greenland participated in screening.
To examine Greenlandic women's perception of disease, their understanding of the connection between HPV and cervical cancer, and the knowledge that they deem necessary to decide whether to participate in cervical cancer screening.
The methods used to perform this research were 2 focus-group interviews with 5 Danish-speaking women and 2 individual interviews with Greenlandic-speaking women. The analysis involved a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach with 3 levels of analysis: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation.
These revealed that women were unprepared for screening results showing cervical cell changes, since they had no symptoms. When diagnosed, participants believed that they had early-stage cancer, leading to feelings of vulnerability and an increased need to care for themselves. Later on, an understanding of HPV as the basis for diagnosis and the realization that disease might not be accompanied by symptoms developed. The outcome for participants was a life experience, which they used to encourage others to participate in screening and to suggest ways that information about screening and HPV might reach a wider Greenlandic population.
Women living through the process of cervical disease, treatment and follow-up develop knowledge about HPV, cervical cell changes, cervical disease and their connection, which, if used to inform cervical screening programmes, will improve the quality of information about HPV, cervical cancer and screening participation. This includes that verbal and written information given at the point of screening and diagnosis needs to be complemented by visual imagery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984277 View in PubMed
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