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Continuity between interview-rated personality disorders and self-reported DSM-5 traits in a Danish psychiatric sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291088
Source
Personal Disord. 2017 Jul; 8(3):261-267
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Bo Bach
Jaime Anderson
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Region Zealand.
Source
Personal Disord. 2017 Jul; 8(3):261-267
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) Section III offers an alternative model for the diagnosis of personality disorders (PDs), including 25 pathological personality trait facets organized into 5 trait domains. To maintain continuity with the categorical PD diagnoses found in DSM-5 Section II, specified sets of facets are configured into familiar PD types. The current study aimed to evaluate the continuity across the Section II and III models of PDs. A sample of 142 psychiatric outpatients were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and rated with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II disorders. We investigated whether the DSM-5 Section III facet-profiles would be associated with their respective Section II counterparts, as well as determining whether additional facets could augment the prediction of the Section II disorders. Results showed that, overall, the interview-rated DSM-5 Section II disorders were most strongly associated with expected self-reported Section III traits. Results also supported the addition of facets not included in the proposed Section III PD criteria. These findings partly underscore the continuity between the Section II and III models of PDs and suggest how it may be enhanced; however, additional research is needed to further evaluate where continuity exists, where it does not exist, and how the traits system could be improved. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
26784892 View in PubMed
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The Swedish version of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO-10). Psychometric properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90398
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2009 May;39(5):730-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nygren Gudrun
Hagberg Bibbi
Billstedt Eva
Skoglund Asa
Gillberg Christopher
Johansson Maria
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. gudrun.m.nygren@vgregion.se
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2009 May;39(5):730-41
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Communication Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Personality Assessment - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Social Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychometric properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders schedule (DISCO) have only been studied in the UK. The authorised Swedish translation of the tenth version of the DISCO (DISCO-10) was used in interviews with close relatives of 91 Swedish patients referred for neuropsychiatrical assessment. Validity analysis compared DISCO-10-algorithm diagnoses with clinical diagnoses and with Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised (ADI-R) algorithm diagnoses in 57 cases. Good-excellent inter-rater reliability was demonstrated in 40 cases of children and adults. The criterion validity was excellent when compared with clinical diagnoses and an investigator-based diagnostic interview. The DISCO-10 has good psychometric properties. Advantages over the ADI-R include valuable information of the broader autism phenotype and co-existing problems for clinical practice and research.
PubMed ID
19148741 View in PubMed
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