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Unconventional indicators of drug dependence among elderly long-term users of benzodiazepines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178341
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Sep;25(6):603-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Philippe Voyer
Michael McCubbin
David Cohen
Sylvie Lauzon
Johanne Collin
Caroline Boivin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing Sciences, Laval University, Cite Universitaire, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. philippe.voyer@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Sep;25(6):603-28
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged - psychology
Anti-Anxiety Agents - adverse effects
Attitude to Health
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects
Denial (Psychology)
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Needs Assessment
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
A quarter of the elderly population is prescribed benzodiazepines (BZD). This has led to growing concerns about drug dependence and the validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for dependence to a substance. This study aimed to understand how dependence was experienced by long-term BZD users. Interviews were conducted with 45 elderly persons who had been using BZDs for an average of nine years. These users' comments suggest six indicators of dependence: self-identifying as a dependent user, invoking multiple stressors to justify BZD use, using BZD to cope with anticipated stressors, trivializing the dangers of BZDs, keeping a supply in reserve, having previously tried and failed to stop, and reducing the dosage. Our results stress the need to take a more elaborate, person-centered view of dependence.
PubMed ID
15371146 View in PubMed
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Use of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in some Swedish child health care centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46597
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(3):149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W. Lundh
C. Gyllang
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(3):149-54
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - nursing
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - nursing
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was validated in 53 women, in comparison with an interview based on the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS-Depression). The EPDS was then applied to 258 women on four occasions, first at 2 and 6 weeks and then at 3 and 8 months post partum. At 2 weeks the proportion of women with signs of depression was 26%, 8% at 6 weeks, 13% at 3 months and 8% at 8 months. An analysis of the 10 items in the EPDS was performed. The subjects felt the questionnaire to express their situation accurately and relevantly. It was also regarded as easy to complete.
PubMed ID
8108616 View in PubMed
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