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Continuity between interview-rated personality disorders and self-reported DSM-5 traits in a Danish psychiatric sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291088
Source
Personal Disord. 2017 Jul; 8(3):261-267
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Bo Bach
Jaime Anderson
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Region Zealand.
Source
Personal Disord. 2017 Jul; 8(3):261-267
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) Section III offers an alternative model for the diagnosis of personality disorders (PDs), including 25 pathological personality trait facets organized into 5 trait domains. To maintain continuity with the categorical PD diagnoses found in DSM-5 Section II, specified sets of facets are configured into familiar PD types. The current study aimed to evaluate the continuity across the Section II and III models of PDs. A sample of 142 psychiatric outpatients were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and rated with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II disorders. We investigated whether the DSM-5 Section III facet-profiles would be associated with their respective Section II counterparts, as well as determining whether additional facets could augment the prediction of the Section II disorders. Results showed that, overall, the interview-rated DSM-5 Section II disorders were most strongly associated with expected self-reported Section III traits. Results also supported the addition of facets not included in the proposed Section III PD criteria. These findings partly underscore the continuity between the Section II and III models of PDs and suggest how it may be enhanced; however, additional research is needed to further evaluate where continuity exists, where it does not exist, and how the traits system could be improved. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
26784892 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-2.25) in Quebec: reliability findings in light of the MECA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204002
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Nov;37(11):1167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
J J Breton
L. Bergeron
J P Valla
C. Berthiaume
M. St-Georges
Author Affiliation
Rivière-des-Prairies Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Nov;37(11):1167-74
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Confidence Intervals
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - standards
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Psychometrics - standards
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Translating
Abstract
To examine the reliability of the French Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-2.25) in Quebec in light of other DISC-2 studies conducted in the National Institute of Mental Health's Methods for the Epidemiology of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders Study.
Reliability was assessed for DSM-III-R disorders in a community sample comprising 260 parents of youths aged 6 to 14 years and 145 adolescents aged 12 to 14 years. The DISC was completed at home. The mean test-retest interval was 13.8 days for parents and 12.8 days for adolescents.
Parents' reports: Internal consistency was acceptable for a majority of disorders. The kappa coefficients were in the fair or good ranges except for depressive disorders and were higher for children than for adolescents, and intraclass correlations were higher than kappa coefficients. Adolescents' reports: Internal consistency was acceptable or nearly acceptable for a majority of disorders. The kappa coefficients were in the fair range, and intraclass correlations were higher than kappa coefficients. The kappa coefficients were significantly higher for the test-retest interval of 7 to 14 days than for 14 to 21 days for adolescents' reports of anxious disorders and internalizing disorders.
The French DISC-2.25 shows acceptable internal consistency and fair to good test-retest reliability. Across DISC-2 studies, test-retest reliability of the parents' reports improved for anxiety and depressive disorders. Among sources of variation, studies on attributes of questions would be meaningful.
PubMed ID
9808928 View in PubMed
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The Memorandum of Good Practice: theory versus application.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32106
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 May;25(5):669-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K J Sternberg
M E Lamb
G M Davies
H L Westcott
Author Affiliation
Section on Social and Emotional Development, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 May;25(5):669-81
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Guidelines
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality of investigative interviews in England and Wales since implementation of the Memorandum of Good Practice (MOGP), which specified how forensic interviews of alleged child abuse victims should be conducted. METHOD: Transcripts of 119 videotaped interviews of alleged victims between the ages of 4 and 13 years were obtained from 13 collaborating police forces. Trained raters then classified the types of prompts used by the investigators to elicit substantive information from the children, and tabulated the number of forensically relevant details provided by the children in each response. RESULTS: Like their counterparts in the United States, Israel, and Sweden, forensic interviewers in England and Wales relied heavily on option-posing prompts, seldom using open-ended utterances to elicit information from the children. Nearly 40% of the information obtained was elicited using option-posing and suggestive prompts, which are known to elicit less reliable information than open-ended prompts do. CONCLUSION: Despite the clarity and specificity of the MOGP, its implementation appears to have had less effect on the practices of forensic interviewers in the field than was hoped. Further work should focus on ways of training interviewers to implement the superior practices endorsed by the MOGP and similar professional guidelines.
PubMed ID
11428428 View in PubMed
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The performance of diagnostic measures of depression in alexithymic and nonalexithymic subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159520
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2008 Jan-Feb;30(1):77-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aino K Mattila
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, FIN-33014 Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2008 Jan-Feb;30(1):77-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine how the outcomes of a structured diagnostic interview for depression are related to the results of a self-report scale in alexithymic and nonalexithymic groups.
Subjects (N=389) recruited from primary care and psychiatric care completed the Depression Scale (DEPS) and the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Major depression was diagnosed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short-Form by telephone.
In the group without major depression, the DEPS scores of the alexithymic subjects were significantly higher than those of the nonalexithymic subjects. In the group with major depression, the ideal cutoff points of the DEPS, assessed by receiver operating characteristic analyses, were essentially higher for the alexithymic patients.
Alexithymic subjects without major depression may be rated as depressive if the only criterion is the score on a self-report scale. Furthermore, alexithymic patients may require higher cutoff points in a self-report depression scale.
PubMed ID
18164945 View in PubMed
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The Swedish version of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO-10). Psychometric properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90398
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2009 May;39(5):730-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nygren Gudrun
Hagberg Bibbi
Billstedt Eva
Skoglund Asa
Gillberg Christopher
Johansson Maria
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. gudrun.m.nygren@vgregion.se
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2009 May;39(5):730-41
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Communication Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Personality Assessment - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Social Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychometric properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders schedule (DISCO) have only been studied in the UK. The authorised Swedish translation of the tenth version of the DISCO (DISCO-10) was used in interviews with close relatives of 91 Swedish patients referred for neuropsychiatrical assessment. Validity analysis compared DISCO-10-algorithm diagnoses with clinical diagnoses and with Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised (ADI-R) algorithm diagnoses in 57 cases. Good-excellent inter-rater reliability was demonstrated in 40 cases of children and adults. The criterion validity was excellent when compared with clinical diagnoses and an investigator-based diagnostic interview. The DISCO-10 has good psychometric properties. Advantages over the ADI-R include valuable information of the broader autism phenotype and co-existing problems for clinical practice and research.
PubMed ID
19148741 View in PubMed
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Unconventional indicators of drug dependence among elderly long-term users of benzodiazepines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178341
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Sep;25(6):603-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Philippe Voyer
Michael McCubbin
David Cohen
Sylvie Lauzon
Johanne Collin
Caroline Boivin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing Sciences, Laval University, Cite Universitaire, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. philippe.voyer@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Sep;25(6):603-28
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged - psychology
Anti-Anxiety Agents - adverse effects
Attitude to Health
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects
Denial (Psychology)
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Needs Assessment
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
A quarter of the elderly population is prescribed benzodiazepines (BZD). This has led to growing concerns about drug dependence and the validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for dependence to a substance. This study aimed to understand how dependence was experienced by long-term BZD users. Interviews were conducted with 45 elderly persons who had been using BZDs for an average of nine years. These users' comments suggest six indicators of dependence: self-identifying as a dependent user, invoking multiple stressors to justify BZD use, using BZD to cope with anticipated stressors, trivializing the dangers of BZDs, keeping a supply in reserve, having previously tried and failed to stop, and reducing the dosage. Our results stress the need to take a more elaborate, person-centered view of dependence.
PubMed ID
15371146 View in PubMed
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Use of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in some Swedish child health care centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46597
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(3):149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W. Lundh
C. Gyllang
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(3):149-54
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - nursing
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - nursing
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was validated in 53 women, in comparison with an interview based on the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS-Depression). The EPDS was then applied to 258 women on four occasions, first at 2 and 6 weeks and then at 3 and 8 months post partum. At 2 weeks the proportion of women with signs of depression was 26%, 8% at 6 weeks, 13% at 3 months and 8% at 8 months. An analysis of the 10 items in the EPDS was performed. The subjects felt the questionnaire to express their situation accurately and relevantly. It was also regarded as easy to complete.
PubMed ID
8108616 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.