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The added value of the combined use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule: diagnostic validity in a clinical Swedish sample of toddlers and young preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267308
Source
Autism. 2015 Feb;19(2):187-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Eric Zander
Harald Sturm
Sven Bölte
Source
Autism. 2015 Feb;19(2):187-99
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Interview, Psychological - methods - standards
Male
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The diagnostic validity of the new research algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the revised algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was examined in a clinical sample of children aged 18-47 months. Validity was determined for each instrument separately and their combination against a clinical consensus diagnosis. A total of N = 268 children (n = 171 with autism spectrum disorder) were assessed. The new Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised algorithms (research cutoff) gave excellent specificities (91%-96%) but low sensitivities (44%-52%). Applying adjusted cutoffs (lower than recommended based on receiver operating characteristics) yielded a better balance between sensitivity (77%-82%) and specificity (60%-62%). Findings for the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule were consistent with previous studies showing high sensitivity (94%-100%) and alongside lower specificity (52%-76%) when using the autism spectrum cutoff, but better balanced sensitivity (81%-94%) and specificity (81%-83%) when using the autism cutoff. A combination of both the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (with adjusted cutoff) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (autism spectrum cutoff) yielded balanced sensitivity (77%-80%) and specificity (87%-90%). Results favor a combined usage of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule in young children with unclear developmental problems, including suspicion of autism spectrum disorder. Evaluated separately, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (cutoff for autism) provides a better diagnostic accuracy than the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised.
PubMed ID
24413849 View in PubMed
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Adult attachment insecurity and narrative processes in psychotherapy: an exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139033
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):498-511
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah I F Daniel
Author Affiliation
The University Clinic, Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. sarah@selskabet.org
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):498-511
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Narration
Object Attachment
Observer Variation
Psychoanalytic Therapy - methods
Scandinavia
Abstract
Different types of client attachment insecurity may affect the psychotherapeutic process in distinct ways. This exploratory study compared the in-session discourse of clients with dismissing and preoccupied attachment states of mind on Adult Attachment Interviews conducted prior to therapy in the context of a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. In a subsample of six sessions from each of eight therapy dyads, preoccupied clients were found to talk more and have longer speaking turns than dismissing clients, who in turn generated more pauses. Using the Narrative Processes Coding System, preoccupied clients were found to show more narrative initiative; whereas, differences in terms of narrative process modes were not as clearly interpretable. Contrary to expectations, the two insecure states of mind were equally different in the relationship-focused psychoanalytic therapy and in the symptom-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy. Suggestions for further investigations of the in-session discourse of clients with different attachment states of mind are given.
PubMed ID
21110406 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug abusers' perceived reasons for self-change in Canada and Switzerland: computer-assisted content analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192643
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2001 Sep;36(11):1467-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
L C Sobell
H K Klingemann
T. Toneatto
M B Sobell
S. Agrawal
G I Leo
Author Affiliation
Center for Psychological Studies, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33314, USA. sobelll@nova.edu
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2001 Sep;36(11):1467-500
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior, Addictive - psychology - therapy
Canada
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted
Remission, Spontaneous
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Switzerland
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
Although many people recover from substance-use associated problems on their own, little is known about this phenomenon. The paper had two objectives: to use a new research method, computer-assisted content analysis, to understand alcohol and drug abusers' perceived reasons for self-change and to undertake a comparative evaluation across substances and cultures to validate previous findings about subjective appraisal processes. Three studies of natural recoveries of alcohol and drug abusers in two countries conducted tape-recorded interviews with 216 respondents. The taped responses were coded based on a content analytic dictionary approach using a computerized content analysis program. All three studies found several processes mediating the decision to change substance use. The computer content analysis confirmed a cognitive appraisal process regardless of the cultural setting or substance. The findings suggest that several procedures might have benefit in clinical interventions.
PubMed ID
11693952 View in PubMed
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An education and training course in motivational interviewing influence: GPs' professional behaviour--ADDITION Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81927
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Jun;56(527):429-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Rubak Sune
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Christensen Bo
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Skejby University, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. sr@alm.au.dk
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Jun;56(527):429-36
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus, type 2 - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Family Practice - education
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods - standards
Motivation
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Motivational interviewing has been shown to be broadly usable in a scientific setting in the management of behavioural problems and diseases. However, data concerning implementation and aspects regarding the use of motivational interviewing in general practice is missing. AIM:To evaluate GPs' conception of motivational interviewing in terms of methods, adherence to and aspects of its use in general practice after a course. STUDY DESIGN: In a randomised controlled trial concerning intensive treatment of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes detected by screening, the GPs were randomised to a course in motivational interviewing or not. The study also included a third group of GPs outside the randomised controlled trial, who had 2 years previously received a similar course in motivational interviewing. SETTING: General practice in Denmark. METHOD: The intervention consisted of a 1.5-day residential course in motivational interviewing with 0.5-day follow-ups, twice during the first year. Questionnaire data from GPs were obtained. RESULTS: We obtained a 100% response-rate from the GPs in all three groups. The GPs trained in motivational interviewing adhered statistically significantly more to the methods than did the control group. More than 95% of the GPs receiving the course stated that they had used the specific methods in general practice. CONCLUSION: A course in motivational interviewing seems to influence GPs professional behaviour. Based on self-reported questionnaires, this study shows that the GPs after a course in motivational interviewing seemed to change their professional behaviour in daily practice using motivational interviewing compared with the control group. GPs evaluated motivational interviewing to be more effective than 'traditional advice giving'. Furthermore, GPs stated that the method was not more time consuming than 'traditional advice giving'.
Notes
Comment In: Fam Med. 2007 Mar;39(3):21517323217
PubMed ID
16762124 View in PubMed
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An Icelandic version of the Kiddie-SADS-PL: translation, cross-cultural adaptation and inter-rater reliability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92307
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(5):379-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Lauth Bertrand
Magnusson Pall
Ferrari Pierre
Pétursson Hannes
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Iceland, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. bertrand@landspitali.is
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(5):379-85
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - instrumentation - methods
Child
Child Psychiatry - instrumentation - methods
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Iceland
Interview, Psychological - methods
Language
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - diagnosis
Schizophrenic Psychology
Semantics
Abstract
The development of structured diagnostic instruments has been an important step for research in child and adolescent psychiatry, but the adequacy of a diagnostic instrument in a given culture does not guarantee its reliability or validity in another population. The objective of the study was to describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation into Icelandic of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (Kiddie-SADS-PL) and to test the inter-rater reliability of the adapted version. To attain cross-cultural equivalency, five important dimensions were addressed: semantic, technical, content, criterion and conceptual. The adapted Icelandic version was introduced into an inpatient clinical setting, and inter-rater reliability was estimated both at the symptom and diagnoses level, for the most frequent diagnostic categories in both international diagnostic classification systems (DSM-IV and ICD-10). The cross-cultural adaptation has provided an Icelandic version allowing similar understanding among different raters and has achieved acceptable cross-cultural equivalence. This initial study confirmed the quality of the translation and adaptation of Kiddie-SADS-PL and constitutes the first step of a larger validation study of the Icelandic version of the instrument.
PubMed ID
18752110 View in PubMed
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Assessing and treating different suicidal states in a danish outpatient sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108420
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2013;17(3):302-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christopher D Corona
David A Jobes
Ann C Nielsen
Christian M Pedersen
Keith W Jennings
René M Lento
Katherine A Brazaitis
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064, USA. 18corona@cardinalmail.cua.edu
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2013;17(3):302-12
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Risk Assessment - methods
Self Report
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The studies presented compare two methodologies for categorizing suicidal patients based on clinical data. Discussion follows regarding implications for risk assessment and treatment. In these studies, 52 outpatient subjects were placed into different groups based on coding their "suicidal motivation" (Study 1) and their "internal struggle" ratings (Study 2) using data collected at intake. Self-report ratings of 6 Suicide Status Form (SSF) Core Constructs (Psychological Pain, Stress, Agitation, Hopelessness, Self-Hate, and Overall Risk of Suicide) recorded both at intake and at completion of treatment were then compared to determine differences in Core Construct ratings among groups at different time points. In Study 1, overall differences among motivation groups (Life-motivated, Ambivalent, and Death-motivated) were significant for ratings at treatment completion of Overall Risk of Suicide, Self-Hate, and Psychological Pain. In Study 2, overall differences among groups (Wish to live, Ambivalent, and Wish to die) were significant for ratings at intake of Overall Risk of Suicide. At completion of treatment, overall differences among groups were significant for ratings of Overall Risk of Suicide, Hopelessness, and Self-Hate. In addition, significant interactions were found between test time and group for Overall Risk of Suicide and Self-Hate. Results suggest that categorizing suicidal patients by motivation and by the nature of their internal struggle could be beneficial to differential risk assessment with implications for clinical treatment.
PubMed ID
23889578 View in PubMed
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Assessing readiness for change in adolescents with eating disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158503
Source
Psychol Assess. 2008 Mar;20(1):63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Josie Geller
Krista E Brown
Shannon L Zaitsoff
Rosanne Menna
Mollie E Bates
Erin C Dunn
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. jgeller@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
Psychol Assess. 2008 Mar;20(1):63-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Canada
Child
Discriminant Analysis
Eating Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Motivation
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Abstract
The Readiness and Motivation Interview (RMI) is a semistructured interview measure of readiness and motivation to change that can be used for all eating disorder diagnoses. The RMI has demonstrated excellent psychometric properties and has both clinical and predictive utility in adult samples. This study examined the psychometric properties of the RMI in a younger population, namely, 12- to 18-year-old girls with eating disorders. Study participants (N = 65) completed the RMI and measures of convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity. Adolescents with eating disorders were able to conceptualize and articulate their readiness for change and to report the extent to which change efforts were for themselves versus for others. RMI readiness profiles across eating disorder symptom domains in adolescents were comparable to those in adults, with higher reported readiness to change binge eating than to change dietary restriction or compensatory strategies. Differences in internal consistency between adult and adolescent samples are discussed. Interviewing adolescents early in treatment about readiness may assist clinicians in forming an alliance with this difficult-to-engage population, while also providing valuable information for treatment planning.
PubMed ID
18315400 View in PubMed
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Assessment of physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders in structured diagnostic interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164012
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne V A Williams
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary (AB) Canada T2N 4N1. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Episode of Care
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Assessment
Syndrome
Abstract
Structured diagnostic inter- views include items that evaluate physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders. The objective of this article was to assess the impact of such items.
A mental health survey in Canada collected data from n = 36,984 household residents. The lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders was calculated with and without exclusions due to physical causes.
Approximately 10% of subjects with a lifetime depressive disorder reported that all of their episodes were due to one or more physical cause. Many of the reported etiologies were implausible given the DSM-IV requirement that the disturbance be a "direct physiological consequence" of the physical cause. The results were similar for manic episodes and anxiety disorders.
Structured diagnostic interviews assess physical etiologies in ways that are subject to inconsistency and inaccuracy. Physical etiology items may bias estimates by introducing etiological opinions into the assessment of disorder frequency.
PubMed ID
17450450 View in PubMed
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The Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II): psychometric properties in Icelandic student and patient populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92309
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(5):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Arnarson Thornorethur Orn
Olason Daníel Thorn
Smári Jakob
Sigurethsson Jón Friethrik
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(5):360-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Patients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is one of the most widely used self-report measures of depression in both research and clinical practice. The Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II) is the most recent version of the BDI. The objective of the present study was to assess the psychometric foundations of the Icelandic translation of the BDI-II, adding to its international knowledge base. Participants were in total 1454, 1206 students and 248 outpatient-clinic patients. All students completed the BDI-II and a subgroup (n=142) completed additional measures of anxiety and depression. The Mini-International Psychiatric Interview (MINI) and the BDI-II were administrated to the patients. Convergent and divergent validity of the BDI-II were supported. It discriminated satisfactorily between patients diagnosed and those not diagnosed with major depression. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed small differences between various factor models of the BDI-II, derived from previous studies. However, a model of three first-order factors (cognitive-affective-somatic) and one second-order factor (general depression) offered an acceptable description of the item covariance structure for the BDI-II in both samples. It is concluded that the psychometric properties of the Icelandic version of the BDI-II are supported in patient and student populations.
PubMed ID
18752106 View in PubMed
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Caring relationships with patients suffering from dementia--an interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202346
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Apr;29(4):800-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
E M Rundqvist
E. Severinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Science, Abo Academy University, Vasa, Finland. rundqvist@mailbox.swipnet.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Apr;29(4):800-7
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dementia - nursing - psychology
Empathy
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Long-Term Care - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study reported in this paper was to describe and analyse care-givers' caring relationships with patients suffering from dementia. The theoretical perspective was caring science. Data were collected through interviews with six care-givers in a ward for patients with severe dementia. From the qualitative analysis of the narratives, the following factors emerged as important for the caring relationships: 'touching', mutual 'confirmation', and the care-givers' 'values in the caring culture' in the ward. We conclude that communication skills are very important in a ward where patients with severe dementia reside, and that there is always a need for formulating the basic values. Theoretical education and clinical supervision are examples of means to improve competence and skills.
PubMed ID
10215970 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.