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539 records – page 1 of 54.

The validity of a revised version of the Mortimer-Filkins Test with impaired drivers in Oshawa, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244351
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1981 Jul;42(7):685-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981

Interviewing alleged victims with intellectual disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87368
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2008 Jan;52(Pt 1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Cederborg A-C
Lamb M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. ann-christin.cederborg@liu.se
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2008 Jan;52(Pt 1):49-58
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Crime Victims
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental retardation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: When interviewing alleged victims of crime, it is important to obtain reports that are as accurate and complete as possible. This can be especially difficult when the alleged victims have intellectual disabilities (ID). This study explored how alleged victims with ID are interviewed by police officers in Sweden and how this may affect their ability to report information as accurately as possible. METHODS: Twelve interviews with 11 alleged victims were selected from a larger sample. The complainants were interviewed when their chronological ages ranged from 6.1 to 22 years. A quantitative analysis examined the type of questions asked and the numbers of words and details they elicited in response. RESULTS: Instead of open-ended questions, the interviewers relied heavily on focused questions, which are more likely to elicit inaccurate information. When given the opportunity, the witnesses were able to answer directive questions informatively. CONCLUSIONS: Interviewers need special skills in order to interview alleged victims who have ID. In addition to using more open-ended questions, interviewers should speak in shorter sentences.
PubMed ID
18173572 View in PubMed
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[Adopted children from developing countries. The adjustment of preschool children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41537
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Dec 13;75(50):4676-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1978
Author
A. Gunnarby
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Dec 13;75(50):4676-7
Date
Dec-13-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Child, Preschool
Developing Countries
Humans
Infant
Interview, Psychological
Social Adjustment
Sweden
PubMed ID
723361 View in PubMed
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Detecting early signs of alcohol problems: a clinical application of an interview method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12777
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1985;8(4):435-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
C. Sandahl
S. Rönnberg
C. Albrechtson
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1985;8(4):435-42
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
In this study a simple interview method to identify patients with potential alcohol problems was tested in a clinical setting. Nurses interviewed an unbiased sample of 393 patients attending practices within occupational health care. The technique used was a day by day follow back procedure covering the preceding two weeks. The time needed to accomplish the interviews varied between 2 and 15 minutes, depending on how much alcohol consumption was reported. Nurses and doctors reported that the interview was easily integrated in daily working routines. When defining the limit of high consumption as more than 200 g absolute alcohol for the two week period, 11% of the group studied (17% among men and 2% among women) were regarded as high consumers. Strategies for confronting and motivating patients for further analysis of their alcohol habits and for treatment are discussed.
PubMed ID
3833819 View in PubMed
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[Motivation and care of alcohol abuse. A new method increases therapeutic efficiency]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11635
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Dec 15;90(50):4574-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1993
Author
S. Andréasson
S. Ekman
L. Forsberg
S. Rönnberg
A. Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska beroendekliniken, St Görans sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Dec 15;90(50):4574-6
Date
Dec-15-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Motivation
Psychotherapy - methods
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
8264298 View in PubMed
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X: a case study of a Swedish neo-Nzi and his reintegration into Swedish society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259918
Source
Behav Sci Law. 2014 May-Jun;32(3):440-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jessica Eve Stern
Source
Behav Sci Law. 2014 May-Jun;32(3):440-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Criminals - psychology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Motivation
National Socialism
Socialization
Societies
Sweden
Terrorism
Abstract
This article provides a case study of a Swedish neo-Nazi and the reintegration program being provided to him. During an extensive interview that took place over two days, he told a researcher that he was interested in having a violent adventure, and that he was drawn to Nazi symbols and history more than their creed. In comparison with ordinary crime, terrorist crime is quite rare, and access to detailed case studies is rarer still, making the development of a prospective risk-assessment instrument extremely difficult. Researchers' "thick descriptions" of their encounters with terrorists can help us to develop putative risk factors which can then be tested against controls. The article concludes by arguing that just as there is no single pathway into or out of terrorism, there can be no single reintegration program. A series of thick descriptions is a first step toward understanding what leads individuals into and out of terrorism.
PubMed ID
24711284 View in PubMed
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Depression embodied: an ambiguous striving against fading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279260
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):501-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Louise Danielsson
Susanne Rosberg
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):501-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Although depression is associated to physical discomfort, meanings of the body in depression are rarely addressed in clinical research. Drawing on the concept of the lived body, this study explores depression as an embodied phenomenon. Using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, the analysis of narrative-based interviews with 11 depressed adults discloses a thematic structure of an embodied process of an ambiguous striving against fading. Five subthemes elicit different dimensions of this process, interpreted as disabling or enabling: feeling estranged, feeling confined, feeling burdensome, sensing life and seeking belongingness. In relation to clinical practice, we suggest that the interdisciplinary team can focus on enhancing the enabling dimensions, for example through guided physical activities to support the patient to feel more alive, capable and connected. Moreover, we suggest that the treatment process benefits from an increased awareness of the ambiguity in the patient's struggle, acknowledging both destructive and recharging elements of the withdrawing, and the perceived conflict in-between.
PubMed ID
25251165 View in PubMed
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Mental illness in the biological and adoptive families of adopted individuals who have become schizophrenic: a preliminary report based on psychiatric interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252590
Source
Proc Annu Meet Am Psychopathol Assoc. 1975;(63):147-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975

Understanding the experiences of hearing voices and sounds others do not hear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102765
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Nov;23(11):1470-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Anne Martha Kalhovde
Ingunn Elstad
Anne-Grethe Talseth
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Nov;23(11):1470-80
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Hallucinations - psychology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Voice
Abstract
In this article, we aim to contribute to the understanding of how people with mental illness experience hearing voices and sounds that others do not hear in daily life. We conducted in-depth interviews with 14 people and analyzed the interviews using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The themes we arrived at included the following: hearing someone else or myself, am I losing my mind?, and daily life recurrently dominated by opposing voices. Our overall understanding of how the voices and sounds were experienced in daily life was that the intentions of others resounded intrusively in the participants and disrupted their lives. The tones and contents of these perplexing perceptions echoed and amplified past, present, and future experiences and concerns. The results elucidate the value that exploring and attempting to understand people's daily life experiences of hearing voices and sounds might have for the voice hearer, his or her family, and health care providers.
PubMed ID
24122514 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3988-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
I. Kjølseth
O. Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Klinikk for geriatri og rehabilitering, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3988-91
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Geriatric Psychiatry
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Norway
Quality of Life
Suicide, Attempted
Abstract
The purpose of the study is to describe the life stories leading to the suicide attempts. In-depth interviews with nine persons who had attempted suicide (six females and three males, mean age 73 years) were analysed using a qualitative method. Five categories describe the main interview topics: "I had to leave home to survive." (childhood, youth), "You have to bear it." (adult life), "I will manage, I always have." (present life), "You have to give in order to get. If you have nothing to offer, then life is not worth living." (expectations for future life), "I want to decide my own life." (reflections concerning the suicide attempt). The life stories have a common theme; the patients grew up under very difficult conditions and had little emotional support. Their basic trust was poorly developed and their self-esteem was dependent on their capability to work and to give. Without this capability they felt worthless, and life was unbearable. Attempted suicide was the consequence.
PubMed ID
9441429 View in PubMed
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539 records – page 1 of 54.