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Accessible support for family caregivers of seniors with chronic conditions: from isolation to inclusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168465
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):179-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Miriam Stewart
Alison Barnfather
Anne Neufeld
Sharon Warren
Nicole Letourneau
Lili Liu
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nusing, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):179-92
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - psychology
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Health education
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Social Isolation
Social Support
Stroke - psychology
Abstract
Accessible support programs can improve health outcomes for family caregivers of older relatives with a chronic condition. Over the course of 6 months, 27 experienced family caregivers provided weekly support via the telephone to 66 individuals, either new family caregivers of seniors recently diagnosed with stroke or newly vulnerable family caregivers (i.e., facing increasing demands from the deterioration of their senior relative's condition) of seniors with Alzheimer's disease. Qualitative data documented the perceived impact of the intervention, including increased satisfaction with support, coping skills, caregiving competence and confidence, and decreased caregiver burden and loneliness. Caregivers identified varied support processes that overcame support deficits in their social networks. These processes can facilitate replication in future research and inform practice, programs, and policies.
PubMed ID
16821200 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods in a school meal intervention study: comparison between control and intervention period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267753
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Aug 28;114(4):635-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2015
Author
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Camilla Trab Damsgaard
Rikke Andersen
Karin Hess Ygil
Elisabeth Wreford Andersen
Majken Ege
Tue Christensen
Louise Bergmann Sørensen
Ken D Stark
Inge Tetens
Anne-Vibeke Thorsen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Aug 28;114(4):635-44
Date
Aug-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Denmark
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food Services
Humans
Intervention Studies
Lunch
Male
Schools
Self Report
Abstract
Bias in self-reported dietary intake is important when evaluating the effect of dietary interventions, particularly for intervention foods. However, few have investigated this in children, and none have investigated the reporting accuracy of fish intake in children using biomarkers. In a Danish school meal study, 8- to 11-year-old children (n 834) were served the New Nordic Diet (NND) for lunch. The present study examined the accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods (berries, cabbage, root vegetables, legumes, herbs, potatoes, wild plants, mushrooms, nuts and fish) characterising the NND. Children, assisted by parents, self-reported their diet in a Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children during the intervention and control (packed lunch) periods. The reported fish intake by children was compared with their ranking according to fasting whole-blood EPA and DHA concentration and weight percentage using the Spearman correlations and cross-classification. Direct observation of school lunch intake (n 193) was used to score the accuracy of food-reporting as matches, intrusions, omissions and faults. The reporting of all lunch foods had higher percentage of matches compared with the reporting of signature foods in both periods, and the accuracy was higher during the control period compared with the intervention period. Both Spearman's rank correlations and linear mixed models demonstrated positive associations between EPA+DHA and reported fish intake. The direct observations showed that both reported and real intake of signature foods did increase during the intervention period. In conclusion, the self-reported data represented a true increase in the intake of signature foods and can be used to examine dietary intervention effects.
PubMed ID
26189886 View in PubMed
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The ADDITION study: proposed trial of the cost-effectiveness of an intensive multifactorial intervention on morbidity and mortality among people with Type 2 diabetes detected by screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47804
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
T. Lauritzen
S. Griffin
K. Borch-Johnsen
N J Wareham
B H Wolffenbuttel
G. Rutten
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - therapy
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - economics - therapy
Intervention Studies
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Netherlands - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - economics
Randomized Controlled Trials - methods
Risk factors
Vascular Diseases - etiology - mortality - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The overall aims of the ADDITION study are to evaluate whether screening for prevalent undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes is feasible, and whether subsequent optimised intensive treatment of diabetes, and associated risk factors, is feasible and beneficial. DESIGN: Population-based screening in three European countries followed by an open, randomised controlled trial. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: People aged 40-69 y in the community, without known diabetes, will be offered a random capillary blood glucose screening test by their primary care physicians, followed, if equal to or greater than 5.5 mmol/l, by fasting and 2-h post-glucose-challenge blood glucose measurements. Three thousand newly diagnosed patients will subsequently receive conventional treatment (according to current national guidelines) or intensive multifactorial treatment (lifestyle advice, prescription of aspirin and ACE-inhibitors, in addition to protocol-driven tight control of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol). Patients allocated to intensive treatment will be further randomised to centre-specific interventions to motivate adherence to lifestyle changes and medication. Duration of follow-up is planned for 5 y. Endpoints will include mortality, macrovascular and microvascular complications, patient health status and satisfaction, process-of-care indicators and costs.
PubMed ID
11063279 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of a two-year oral health intervention programme in two Swedish secondary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113112
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
E. Hedman
P. Gabre
D. Birkhed
M. Lepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentisty, Public Dental Health, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Communication
Dental Hygienists
Dental Prophylaxis
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Focus Groups
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oral Health
Patient Participation
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
School Dentistry
Self Concept
Sweden
Time Factors
Trust
Abstract
To describe adolescents' experiences of participating in a school-based oral health intervention programme for 2 years containing education about oral health and fluoride varnish treatment at the school clinic.
Sixteen adolescents aged 13-16 were interviewed in three focus group sessions. A phenomenographic approach was used for analysis.
The results are presented as three themes and seven descriptive categories. The three themes were 'Seeing the dental hygienist', 'Treatments at the dental hygiene clinic' and 'Education about oral health in class'. The results demonstrate satisfaction with the intervention, such as accessibility, time gain and expanding knowledge. On the other hand, feelings of vulnerability in the treatment sessions were expressed. The fluoride varnish treatment was given both positive and negative reviews. The contact between the participants and the dental hygienist was important, and the opportunity to ask questions about oral health issues was emphasized.
Both positive and negative experiences of the programme were found. Adolescence is a transitional period of life, and for this reason, it is important to create a good working alliance between students and the dental hygienist in future school-based oral health interventions.
PubMed ID
23763634 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of a clinical intervention according to instruments inspired by the ethnopsychiatric approach elaborated by Devereux and Nathan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170493
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2005;30(2):233-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Marie-Rosaire Tshisekedi-Kalanga
Gisèle Legault
Author Affiliation
Ecole de service social, Université de Montréal.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2005;30(2):233-55
Date
2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnopsychology
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This article analyses a clinical intervention that was carried out at the ethnopsychiatric unit of the Jean-Talon hospital in Montreal. The authors first present an overview of the central concepts of an ethnopsychiatric approach elaborated in France by Nathan in response to mental health problems experienced by immigrants. The authors' intervention is in line with this ethnopsychiatric approach currently being developed in Quebec. The clinical situation is then presented followed by a description of the intervention carried out by the ethnopsychiatric unit. Finally, the authors conclude with an analysis of the situation from various perspectives: psychosocial, psychodynamic (modern etiology) and cultural (traditional etiology).
PubMed ID
16505933 View in PubMed
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An efficacy study of a combined parent and teacher management training programme for children with ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129013
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;66(2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Monica Ostberg
Ann-Margret Rydell
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Specialist Child Health Clinic, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. monica.ostberg@telia.com
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;66(2):123-30
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology - therapy
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Behavior Therapy
Child
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Faculty
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mental disorders
Parents - education
Psychotherapy, Group
Schools
Sweden
Abstract
Several parent training programmes and behavioural teacher training programmes built on learning theory have been developed for problem prevention and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) during the last few decades. Group format has often been used for parent training but single-subject designs are more common in teacher training. More studies have focussed on pre-school children than on older children, and a minority have been conducted in public mental health settings.
This study aimed to evaluate a combined parent and teacher manual-based group training programme for children with ADHD conducted by the staff at a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic in Sweden.
The intervention was a modified version of Barkley's programme. Children were randomized to an Intervention or a Control group. Sixty-one parents and 68 teachers answered questions about ADHD and ODD symptoms, and about behavioural problems when the study started and at a 3-month follow-up.
RESULTS showed that the intervention resulted in a reduction of the number of children who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD and/or ODD. Effects were more pronounced in the home setting than in the school setting, and were further accentuated when both parents and teachers of the same child took part in the intervention. Teachers with more problematic classroom situations benefited most from the intervention.
The programme, "Strategies in Everyday Life", has, in a regular clinical setting, demonstrated promising effects on children's disruptive behaviour, and a clinical implication was to recommend involving both parents and teachers in the programme.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22150634 View in PubMed
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An indoor air filtration study in homes of elderly: cardiovascular and respiratory effects of exposure to particulate matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261646
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12:116
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Dorina Gabriela Karottki
Michal Spilak
Marie Frederiksen
Lars Gunnarsen
Elvira Vaclavik Brauner
Barbara Kolarik
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Torben Sigsgaard
Lars Barregard
Bo Strandberg
Gerd Sallsten
Peter Møller
Steffen Loft
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12:116
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena - drug effects
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cities
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Filtration
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Inflammation - blood - etiology
Intervention Studies
Lung - drug effects - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - analysis - toxicity
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
Exposure to particulate air pollution increases respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly, possibly through inflammation and vascular dysfunction.
We examined potential beneficial effects of indoor air filtration in the homes of elderly, including people taking vasoactive drugs.Forty-eight nonsmoking subjects (51 to 81 years) in 27 homes were included in this randomized, double-blind, crossover intervention study with consecutive two-week periods with or without the inclusion of a high-efficiency particle air filter in re-circulating custom built units in their living room and bedroom. We measured blood pressure, microvascular and lung function and collected blood samples for hematological, inflammation, monocyte surface and lung cell damage markers before and at day 2, 7 and 14 during each exposure scenario.
The particle filters reduced the median concentration of PM2.5 from approximately 8 to 4 µg/m3 and the particle number concentration from 7669 to 5352 particles/cm3. No statistically significant effects of filtration as category were observed on microvascular and lung function or the biomarkers of systemic inflammation among all subjects, or in the subgroups taking (n = 11) or not taking vasoactive drugs (n = 37). However, the filtration efficacy was variable and microvascular function was within 2 days significantly increased with the actual PM2.5 decrease in the bedroom, especially among 25 subjects not taking any drugs.
Substantial exposure contrasts in the bedroom and no confounding by drugs appear required for improved microvascular function by air filtration, whereas no other beneficial effect was found in this elderly population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24373585 View in PubMed
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An introduction to the framework project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207737
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
J E Till
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto. till@oci.utoronto.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Consumer Participation
Decision Making
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics
Female
Health planning
Health Priorities
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - prevention & control - therapy
Palliative Care
Population Surveillance
Program Development
Research
Smoking - prevention & control
Social Responsibility
Abstract
The framework project of the Advisory Committee on Cancer Control (ACOCC), National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), was based on the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework for bridging the gap between research and action. The project was carried out under the auspices of the Sociobehavioural Cancer Research Network (SCRN) of the NCIC. It focused on 3 research areas of cancer control research: smoking control, palliative care and screening for breast cancer. In this introductory paper, the criteria and methodology used for the framework project are described, the main features of the framework are outlined and the definitions of terms used in the framework are summarized. It was expected that the framework project would lead to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework. The project was also expected to assist the SCRN in its ongoing efforts to develop and refine an action-oriented research agenda.
PubMed ID
9765744 View in PubMed
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Annoyance and health symptoms and their influencing factors: a population-based air pollution intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89424
Source
Public Health. 2009 Apr;123(4):339-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Stenlund T.
Lidén E.
Andersson K.
Garvill J.
Nordin S.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Public Health. 2009 Apr;123(4):339-45
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Anger
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Industry
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden
Urban health
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Interventions for reducing air pollution are important means for improving public health. The role of psychological factors in understanding annoyance and health symptoms due to air pollution is limited and further investigation is required. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an intervention to reduce air pollution (predominantly dust and soot) with respect to perceived pollution, risk perception, annoyance and health symptoms. Another objective was to test a model that describes inter-relations between air pollution, perceived pollution, health risk perception, annoyance and health symptoms. STUDY DESIGN: An interventional, population-based questionnaire study. METHODS: Surveys were performed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) closure of a sinter plant. Instead, pellets were shipped to the community's harbour for steel production. Individuals in the community aged 18-75 years were selected at random for participation in the pre-test (n=738; 74% of the sample participated) and post-test (n=684; 68% of the sample participated). The two samples were representative of the populations at the two points in time, and thus not identical. RESULTS: After the sinter plant was closed, the environment was perceived as being less dusty, the residents were more positive in their risk perception, and they reported less annoyance due to dust, soot and odorous substances. No difference was found for health symptoms between the pre-test and the post-test. Based on path analyses, a model is proposed of inter-relations between air pollution, perceived pollution, health risk perception, annoyance and health symptoms. CONCLUSION: The intervention was successful with respect to perceived dust and soot pollution; to annoyance attributed to dust, soot and odorous substances; and to risk perception. The path analyses suggest that perceived pollution and health risk perception play important roles in understanding and predicting environmentally induced annoyance and health symptoms.
PubMed ID
19344922 View in PubMed
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[Antioxidants and cardiovascular disorders--epidemiologic aspects. Should high risk patients receive supplementation?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215980
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Jan 20;115(2):227-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1995
Author
S. Tonstad
Author Affiliation
Lipidklinikken, Medisinsk avdeling A, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Jan 20;115(2):227-9
Date
Jan-20-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin E, vitamin C, beta carotene and flavonoids may retard atherosclerosis by preventing low density lipoprotein oxidation. Observational epidemiological studies, including ecological correlations, case control and prospective studies, indicate that high vitamin E levels may be associated with decreased cardiovascular disease. Beta carotene may be protective among smokers and the elderly. Few studies have been able to show that vitamin C has a protective effect. A handful of intervention studies have examined the effects of vitamin E and beta carotene with mixed results. While few side effects of antioxidant supplementation are known, the results of current, large-scale studies in primary intervention must be awaited before recommendations can be made. Increased intake of fruits and vegetables that are rich in antioxidants is recommended.
PubMed ID
7855818 View in PubMed
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417 records – page 1 of 42.