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25 records – page 1 of 3.

An ethicist’s commentary on the sale of a veterinary practice to an associate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122069
Source
Can Vet J. 2012 Feb;53(2):119-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012

Commentary: Lack of scientific influences on epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159003
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Feb;37(1):59-64; discussion 65-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Carl V Phillips
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 114 St-89 Ave, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E1, Canada. carl.v.phillips@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Feb;37(1):59-64; discussion 65-8
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Conflict of Interest
Epidemiologic Research Design
Ethics, Business
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional Corporations - ethics
Science
Scientific Misconduct
Notes
Comment On: Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Feb;37(1):46-5318245050
PubMed ID
18245053 View in PubMed
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Dare we speak of ethics? Attending to the unsayable amongst nurse leaders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141191
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2010 Sep;17(5):566-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Kara Schick Makaroff
Janet Storch
Lorelei Newton
Tom Fulton
Lynne Stevenson
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria, School of Nursing, Victoria, BC, Canada. karimasm@uvic.ca
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2010 Sep;17(5):566-76
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Canada
Communication Barriers
Community-Based Participatory Research
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Ethics, Nursing
Faculty, Nursing
Health Facility Environment - ethics
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Leadership
Nurse Administrators - ethics - psychology
Research Design
Semantics
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
There is increasing emphasis on the need for collaboration between practice and academic leaders in health care research. However, many problems can arise owing to differences between academic and clinical goals and timelines. In order for research to move forward it is important to name and address these issues early in a project. In this article we use an example of a participatory action research study of ethical practice in nursing to highlight some of the issues that are not frequently discussed and we identify the impact of things not-named. Further, we offer our insights to others who wish to be partners in research between academic and practice settings. These findings have wide implications for ameliorating misunderstandings that may develop between nurse leaders in light of collaborative research, as well as for participatory action research.
PubMed ID
20801959 View in PubMed
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The development of ethical guidelines for nurses' collegiality using the Delphi method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285166
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Aug;24(5):538-555
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Mari Kangasniemi
Katariina Arala
Eve Becker
Anna Suutarla
Toni Haapa
Anne Korhonen
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Aug;24(5):538-555
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Delphi Technique
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Male
Middle Aged
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Nurses' collegiality is topical because patient care is complicated, requiring shared knowledge and working methods. Nurses' collaboration has been supported by a number of different working models, but there has been less focus on ethics.
This study aimed to develop nurses' collegiality guidelines using the Delphi method.
Two online panels of Finnish experts, with 35 and 40 members, used the four-step Delphi method in December 2013 and January 2014. They reformulated the items of nurses' collegiality identified by the literature and rated based on validity and importance. Content analysis and descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze the data, and the nurses' collegiality guidelines were formulated. Ethical considerations: Organizational approval was received, and an informed consent was obtained from all participants. Information about the voluntary nature of participation was provided.
During the first Delphi panel round, a number of items were reformulated and added, resulting in 32 reformulated items. As a result of the second round, 8 of the 32 items scored an agreement rate of more than 75%, with the most rated item being collegiality means that professionals respect each other. The item with second highest rating was collegiality has a common objective: what is best for patients, followed by the third highest which was professional ethics is the basis of collegiality.
Nurses' collegiality and its content are well recognized in clinical practice but seldom studied. Collegiality can be supported by guidelines, and nurses working in clinical practice, together with teachers and managers, have shared responsibilities to support and develop it. More research in different nursing environments is needed to improve understanding of the content and practice of nursing collegiality.
PubMed ID
26754970 View in PubMed
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Ethical challenges in the provision of end-of-life care in Norwegian nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142593
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Aug;71(4):677-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Elisabeth Gjerberg
Reidun Førde
Reidar Pedersen
Georg Bollig
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services/Section for Medical Ethics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. elisabeth.gjerberg@medisin.uio.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Aug;71(4):677-84
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Resources - ethics - supply & distribution
Homes for the Aged - ethics - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - ethics - organization & administration
Nursing Staff - psychology
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Family Relations - ethics
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Terminal Care - ethics
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
As in other Western countries, most Norwegian nursing home patients are suffering from multi-pathological conditions and a large majority of them will die in the nursing home. End-of-life care represents many challenges, and it is a widespread concern that several nursing homes lack both resources and competence to ensure good quality care. This article examines the types and prevalence of ethical challenges in end-of-life care as nursing home staff consider them, as well as what they believe can help them to better cope with the ethical challenges. It is based on a national survey probing Norwegian nursing homes' end-of-life care at the ward level conducted in 2007. 664 respondents from 364 nursing homes answered the questionnaire, representing 68% of the patients and 76% of the nursing home sample. Inadequate care due to lack of resources and breaches of the patient's autonomy and integrity were the ethical challenges reported most often. Conflicts with the next of kin regarding nursing care and termination of life-prolonging treatment were reported more seldom. However, when asking the respondents to outline one of the most recent ethical dilemmas they had encountered, the majority of the respondents described ethical dilemmas concerning limitation of life-prolonging treatment, often mixed with disagreements between the wish of the family and that of the patient, or between the wish of the next of kin and what the staff consider to be right. Ethical dilemmas associated with breaches of the patient's autonomy and integrity were also thoroughly described. According to the staff, better ethical knowledge along with more time to reflect on ethical dilemmas were the initiatives most desired to improve the staff's way of handling ethical challenges. Furthermore, to have an opportunity to consult with a person holding ethical competence was emphasised by more than half of the respondents.
PubMed ID
20580142 View in PubMed
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The ethics of interprofessional collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117157
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Jun;20(4):426-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Joyce Engel
Dawn Prentice
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines,ONL2S 3A1, Canada. jengel@brocku.ca
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Jun;20(4):426-35
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing
Ethics, Nursing
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Patient Safety
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
United States
Abstract
Interprofessional collaboration has become accepted as an important component in today's health care and has been guided by concerns with patient safety, quality health-care outcomes, and economics. It is widely accepted that interprofessional collaboration improves patient outcomes through enhanced communication among health-care providers and increased accessibility to services. Although there is a paucity of research that provides confirmatory evidence, interprofessional competencies continue to be incorporated into the curricula of health-care students. This article examines the ethics of interprofessional collaboration and ethical issues that arise from the mainstream adoption of interprofessional competencies and the potential for moral distress in nursing.
PubMed ID
23329780 View in PubMed
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Habits in perioperative nursing culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155780
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Sep;15(5):670-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Lillemor Lindwall
Iréne von Post
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden. lillemor.lindwall@mdh.se
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Sep;15(5):670-81
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Focus Groups
Habits
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Middle Aged
Nurse Anesthetists - ethics
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Organizational Culture
Perioperative Nursing - ethics
Power (Psychology)
Sweden
Abstract
This study focuses on investigating habits in perioperative nursing culture, which are often simply accepted and not normally considered or discussed. A hermeneutical approach was chosen as the means of understanding perioperative nurses' experiences of and reflections on operating theatre culture. Focus group discussions were used to collect data, which was analysed using hermeneutical text analysis. The results revealed three main categories of habits present in perioperative nursing culture: habits that promote ethical values (by temporary friendship with patients, showing respect for each other, and spending time on reflection on ethics and caring); habits that hinder progress (by seeing the patient as a surgical case, not acknowledging colleagues, and not talking about ethics); and habits that set the cultural tone (the hidden power structure and achieving more in less time).
PubMed ID
18687820 View in PubMed
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How to avoid and prevent coercion in nursing homes: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266133
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Sep;20(6):632-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Elisabeth Gjerberg
Marit Helene Hem
Reidun Førde
Reidar Pedersen
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Sep;20(6):632-44
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coercion
Dementia - nursing
Geriatric Nursing - ethics
Homes for the Aged - ethics - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Norway
Nurse's Practice Patterns - ethics - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Homes - ethics - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care - ethics
Restraint, Physical - ethics - methods
Abstract
In many Western countries, studies have demonstrated extensive use of coercion in nursing homes, especially towards patients suffering from dementia. This article examines what kinds of strategies or alternative interventions nursing staff in Norway used when patients resist care and treatment and what conditions the staff considered as necessary to succeed in avoiding the use of coercion. The data are based on interdisciplinary focus group interviews with nursing home staff. The study revealed that the nursing home staff usually spent a lot of time trying a wide range of approaches to avoid the use of coercion. The most common strategies were deflecting and persuasive strategies, limiting choices by conscious use of language, different kinds of flexibility and one-to-one care. According to the staff, their opportunities to use alternative strategies effectively are greatly affected by the nursing home's resources, by the organization of care and by the staff's competence.
PubMed ID
23442786 View in PubMed
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Identifying bioethics learning needs: a survey of Canadian emergency medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169784
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2006 Jun;13(6):645-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Merril A Pauls
Stacy Ackroyd-Stolarz
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. merril_pauls@yahoo.com
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2006 Jun;13(6):645-52
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethics - education
Canada
Conflict of Interest
Drug Industry - ethics
Emergency Medicine - education - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Nursing - education - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Interprofessional Relations - ethics
Needs Assessment
Occupational Exposure - ethics
Professional Autonomy
Professional Misconduct - ethics
Social Behavior
Social Responsibility
Spouse Abuse - ethics
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
Emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate training programs must prepare residents for the ethical challenges of clinical practice. Bioethics curricula have been developed for EM residents, but they are based on expert opinion rather than resident learning needs. Educational interventions based on identified learning needs are more effective at changing practice than interventions that are not. The goal of this study was to identify the bioethics learning needs of Canadian EM residents.
A survey-based needs assessment of Canadian EM residents was performed between July 2000 and June 2001. Residents were asked to identify their learning needs by rating bioethics topics and by relating their clinical experiences. Physicians and nurses who work with residents were surveyed in a similar manner and also asked to identify the residents' bioethics learning needs.
A total of 129 EM residents (77% of eligible residents), 94 physicians, and 87 nurses responded. Residents, physicians, and nurses all identified issues in end-of-life care as the greatest bioethics learning needs of the residents. Other areas identified as learning needs included negotiating consent, capacity assessment, truth telling, and breaking bad news. A learning need identified by nurses, but not residents, was the manner in which residents interact with patients and colleagues.
This needs assessment provides valuable information about the ethical challenges EM residents encounter and the ethical issues they believe they have not been prepared to face. This information should be used to direct and shape ethics education interventions for EM residents.
PubMed ID
16614457 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.