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1727 records – page 1 of 173.

A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of aggression at work and psychological health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51790
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Annie Hogh
Marie Engström Henriksson
Hermann Burr
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ah@ami.dk
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Workplace
Abstract
In a longitudinal cohort study, organizational climate and long-term effects of exposure to nasty teasing (aggression) at work were investigated. The baseline consisted of a representative sample of Danish employees in 1995 with a response rate of 80% (N = 5,652). Of these, 4,647 participated in the follow-up in 2000 (response rate 84%). In 1995, 6.3% were subjected to nasty teasing with no significant gender difference. At baseline, we found significant associations among nasty teasing, a negative organizational climate, and psychological health effects. In the follow-up analyses, associations were found between exposure to nasty teasing at baseline and psychological health problems at follow-up, even when controlled for organizational climate and psychological health at baseline and nasty teasing at follow-up. Stratified for gender, the follow-up associations were significant for women but not for men. Low coworker support and conflicts at baseline and teasing at follow-up mediated the effects on men.
PubMed ID
16262544 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study on subjective well-being and relationships to person-environment (P-E) fit and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence of older Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154920
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Monica Werngren-Elgström
Gunilla Carlsson
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In order to investigate how well-being and ill health is affected by the process of aging, the main aim was to investigate these self-perceived aspects of health over a 10-year period among older Swedish adults. The aim was also to study how these aspects correlated with objectively assessed functional limitations, use of mobility device, person-environment (P-E) fit (also denoted accessibility), problems in housing, and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence. Using the Swedish national population register, a baseline sample of persons aged 75-84 years was identified. Out of the 133 participants at baseline (1994), the 31 participants still available 10 years later were included. The data were collected by means of interview and observation at home visits. Overall, the participants rated their subjective well-being as high and a stable prevalence of ill-health symptoms over time was reported. Changes in subjective well-being as related to changes in functional aspects seem to mainly occur earlier in the aging process, while as time goes by these relations weaken. ADL dependence, however, is more influential in more advanced age. The results confirm the complexity of the construct of health. A main contribution is that the results shed light on the importance of taking the impact of environmental factors into consideration.
PubMed ID
18829123 View in PubMed
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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Abstinence in late adolescence--antecedents to and covariates of a sober lifestyle and its consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11379
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
H. Leifman
E. Kühlhorn
P. Allebeck
S. Andréasson
A. Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):113-21
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Fathers
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Behavior
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was first to compare 18-19-year-old male abstainers with alcohol consumers, and especially light consumers, regarding degree of sociability as indicated by their (in)security in the company of others, their number of close friends, intimate conversations with friends and their popularity in school. Secondly, we analysed the importance of antecedents to and covariates of abstinence. In addition, the significant antecedents and covariates gave us information as to abstinence patterns. The study was based on a survey of all Swedish males, 18-19 years old, conscripted for military service in 1969-70. Data had been collected by means of questionnaires and psychological interviews, giving measures of each respondent's social background, psychiatric/psychological and psychosomatic health status, substance use, deviant behaviour and degree of sociability. Poor sociability was more common among the abstainers than among all the other categories of drinkers, including the light consumers. The conscripts' social background, and especially their fathers' drinking habits, had the strongest effects in explaining abstinence. Sixty-two per cent of all abstainers had non-drinking fathers, compared to 28% of the light consumers. As to the majority of abstainers, this indicates a link between the social background of temperance and their own reported abstinence. Their poor sociability could be a consequence of abstaining at a young age when abstinence is uncommon. Those who abstained despite a drinking father showed a worsening psychological status, suggesting a link between psychologically impaired health, poor sociability and abstinence. Though the abstainers were the least sociable, the difference between the abstainers, the light consumers and the moderate consumers in other categories were generally small.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7667664 View in PubMed
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Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an emotional and behavioural screening tool for children in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in urban NSW.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140192
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anna Williamson
Sally Redman
Mark Dadds
John Daniels
Catherine D'Este
Beverley Raphael
Sandra Eades
Tracey Skinner
Author Affiliation
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. anna.williamson@saxinstitute.org.au
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Community Health Services
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental health
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHOs) located in the greater Sydney region.
A qualitative study was conducted in three ACCHOs located within the greater Sydney region in 2008-2009. A semi-structured approach was used in focus groups and small group interviews (n = 47) to elicit participants' views on the appropriateness of the SDQ and any additional issues of importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health.
The SDQ was found to cover many important aspects of Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health, however, the wording of some questions was considered ambiguous and some critical issues are not explored. The peer relationships subscale did not appear to fit well with Aboriginal concepts of the relative importance of different interpersonal relationships.
Overall the SDQ was acceptable in ACCHOs in Sydney; however, changes to the wording of some questions and the response scale may be indicated to improve cultural appropriateness and clarity. A further set of issues which are not covered by any commonly used screening tools but are of critical importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health should also be considered by clinicians.
PubMed ID
20932203 View in PubMed
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Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144806
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mélanie Levasseur
Johanne Desrosiers
Gale Whiteneck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12ième avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 5N4, Canada. Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Social Perception
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP.
A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age=73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components.
Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P=0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in "Physical environment and accessibility" (R2=0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in "Social support and attitudes" (R2=0.51).
With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20237957 View in PubMed
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Accounting for depressive symptoms in women: a twin study of associations with interpersonal relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45767
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Oct 1;82(1):101-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2004
Author
Erica L Spotts
Jenae M Neiderhiser
Jody Ganiban
David Reiss
Paul Lichtenstein
Kjell Hansson
Marianne Cederblad
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, S-171-77 Stockholm, Sweden. Erica.Spotts@mep.ki.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Oct 1;82(1):101-11
Date
Oct-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marriage
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study examined how interpersonal relationships, specifically marital quality and adequacy of social support, are associated with depressive symptoms among women. METHODS: A sample of 326 female monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs and their spouses was drawn from the Swedish Twin Registry. Associations among the three variables were evaluated by comparing similarities among monozygotic and dizygotic female twin pairs. RESULTS: Interpersonal relationships contributed between 18% and 31% of the variance for depressive symptoms in women. Associations among the three variables were accounted for by genetic influences when women's reports were used. Non-shared environmental influences were important for the association between marital quality and depressive symptoms when a combination of husband and wife reports of marital quality were used. LIMITATIONS: The data is cross-sectional and the generalizability of these findings to depressive symptoms in men or to individuals with major depression is not clear. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate important associations among marital quality, social support and depressive symptoms in women, which should be taken into consideration for prevention and intervention strategies targeting depression.
PubMed ID
15465582 View in PubMed
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1727 records – page 1 of 173.