Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1123 records – page 1 of 113.

2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174812
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005
Author
Don Yee
Alysa Fairchild
Mira Keyes
Jim Butler
George Dundas
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Date
Jun-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Radiation Oncology - education
Abstract
Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences.
Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey.
Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns.
Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.
PubMed ID
15890597 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114387
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fadi T Hamadani
Dan Deckelbaum
Alexandre Sauve
Kosar Khwaja
Tarek Razek
Paola Fata
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Division of Trauma Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Patient Safety
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workload - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training.
We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions.
Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life.
The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care.
PubMed ID
23618437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168081
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Genevieve Roy
Ram Parvataneni
Brooke Friedman
Katherine Eastwood
Phillip D Darney
Jody Steinauer
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):309-14
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic - education - utilization
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Obstetrics - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical
Abstract
To study abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology (ob-gyn) residency programs.
An anonymous questionnaire was sent to all postgraduate year (PGY)-4 and PGY-5 ob-gyn residents (n=130) and residency program directors (n=16) in Canada. The questionnaires inquired about demographic information, details of abortion training, resident participation in training, and intention to provide abortions after residency.
Ninety-two of 130 residents (71%) and 15 of 16 program directors (94%) responded. Abortion training is considered routine in approximately half of programs and elective in half. The majority of residents (71%) participated in abortion training, and half plan to do elective abortions after residency. More than half of residents felt competent after training to perform first-trimester aspiration and second-trimester inductions but did not feel competent in first-trimester medical abortions or dilation and evacuation (D&E). Residents were more likely to participate in training if the program arranged the training for residents (P=.04) and were more likely to intend to provide abortions if the training was considered routine (P=.02), while controlling for all significant demographic and training variables.
Most Canadian ob-gyn programs offer some training in elective abortion, but only half include it routinely in training, and the minority of residents feels competent in D&E and medical abortion. Integrated abortion training was associated with greater resident participation in training and increased likelihood of intention to provide abortions after residency.
PubMed ID
16880300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse of residents: it's time to take action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211834
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1996
Author
M F Myers
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Date
Jun-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression
Canada
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Women - psychology
Prejudice
Sex Factors
Sexual Harassment
Abstract
The scientific study of the sexual dynamics that come into play during residency training seems to both fascinate and repel trainees and their supervisors. One of the more provocative and shameful dimensions of this area of inquiry, the abuse of residents, causes a good deal of distress. How do we respond to findings of significant psychological abuse, discrimination on the basis of sex or sexual orientation and sexual harassment in medical settings? How can we ignore over a decade of research? How can we not heed the experience of so many young physicians? Given the uncertain times in Canadian medicine and the insecurity in our professional and personal lives, we must work together to improve the culture of our teaching institutions and implement measures nationally and locally to close this dark chapter.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Feb 10;251(6):739-426694276
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1056-77897792
Cites: JAMA. 1995 May 17;273(19):15537739086
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Feb 7;275(5):414-68569024
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1022-57897785
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1987 Sep;28(9):462-83432549
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Jan 26;263(4):527-322294324
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;151(1):10-78267106
Comment On: CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1657-658646653
PubMed ID
8646658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic family physicians' perception of genetic testing and integration into practice: a CERA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115009
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Arch G Mainous
Sharleen P Johnson
Svetlana Chirina
Richard Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. mainouag@musc.edu
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Faculty, Medical
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Genetic Testing - methods
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
United States
Abstract
Genetic testing for a variety of diseases is becoming more available to primary care physicians, but it is unclear how useful physicians perceive these tests to be. We examined academic family physicians' perception of and experiences with clinical genetic testing and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.
This study is an analysis of a survey conducted as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA). Academic family physicians in the United States and Canada were queried about their perception of genetic testing's utility, how frequently patients ask about genetic testing, and the importance of genetic testing in future practice and education of students and residents.
The overall survey had a response rate of 45.1% (1,404/3,112). A majority (54.4%) of respondents felt that they were not knowledgeable about available genetic tests. Respondents perceived greater utility of genetic tests for breast cancer (94.9%) and hemochromatosis (74.9%) than for Alzheimer's disease (30.3%), heart disease (25.4%), or diabetes (25.2%). Individuals with greater self-perceived knowledge of genetic tests were more likely to feel that genetic testing would have a significant impact on their future practice (23.1%) than those with less knowledge (13.4%). Respondents had little exposure to direct-to-consumer genetic tests, but a majority felt that they were more likely to cause harm than benefit.
Academic family physicians acknowledge their lack of knowledge about genetic tests. Educational initiatives may be useful in helping them incorporate genetic testing into practice and in teaching these skills to medical students and residents.
PubMed ID
23553089 View in PubMed
Less detail

The academic half-day in Canadian neurology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177008
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Colin Chalk
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adult
Canada
Education, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Neurology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The academic half-day (AHD) appears to have become widespread in Canadian neurology residency programs, but there is little published information about the structure, content, or impact of the AHD.
A written questionnaire was sent to the directors of all active Canadian adult and child neurology residency programs.
All 21 program directors responded. An AHD was operating in 15/15 adult and 5/6 child neurology programs. The AHD typically lasts three hours, and occurs weekly, 10 months per year. Most of the weekly sessions are lectures or seminars, usually led by clinicians, with about 90% resident attendance. Course-like features (required textbook, examinations) are present in many AHDs. There is a wide range of topics, from disease pathophysiology to practice management, with considerable variation between programs.
Almost all Canadian neurology programs now have an AHD. Academic half-days are broadly similar in content and format across the country, and residents now spend a substantial portion of their training attending the AHD. The impact of the AHD on how residency programs are organized, and on the learning, clinical work, and professional development of residents merits further study.
PubMed ID
15595258 View in PubMed
Less detail

The academic organization of residency programs: the evaluation of the effect of "service" responsibilities upon the residency program; the influence of personal responsibility of a "chief" for the resident compared with the "system" approach to resident education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111652
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):760-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-1966
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):760-2
Date
Oct-8-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospitalization
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medical Staff, Hospital
Universities
PubMed ID
5926143 View in PubMed
Less detail

The academic organization of residency programs: the evaluation of the effect of "service" responsibilities upon the residency program; the influence of personal responsibility of a "chief" for the resident compared with the "system" approach to resident education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111653
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):759
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-1966
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):759
Date
Oct-8-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospitalization
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medical Staff, Hospital
PubMed ID
5926142 View in PubMed
Less detail

1123 records – page 1 of 113.