Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Clinical educators' empowerment, job tension, and job satisfaction: A test of Kanter's Theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169867
Source
J Nurses Staff Dev. 2006 Mar-Apr;22(2):78-86
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary-Anne Davies
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. Maryanne.davies@lhsc.on.ca
Source
J Nurses Staff Dev. 2006 Mar-Apr;22(2):78-86
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Faculty, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - statistics & numerical data
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Professional Role
Psychological Theory
Regression Analysis
Social Perception
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Recruitment and retention of qualified nursing staff are vital to safe patient care and require the expertise of clinical educators to facilitate the nurses' professional development. However, organizational redesign has challenged clinical educators with role ambiguity, job stress, and decreased job satisfaction. This study used Kanter's Structural Theory of Organizational Behavior to examine the relationships between clinical educators' perceptions of empowerment, job tension, and job satisfaction. High levels of workplace empowerment were significantly related to low levels of job tension. In addition, the combination of high levels of empowerment and low levels of job tension was predictive of high levels of job satisfaction. Implications for staff development administrators are discussed.
PubMed ID
16603905 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of veterinary medical degree enrollment for academic years 1993-1994 and 1994-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214085
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1995 Oct 15;207(8):1036-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1995

Prediction of graduate dietetic internship appointments in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224358
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1991;52(2):89-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
G M Beazley
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1991;52(2):89-93
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Dietetics - education - manpower
Discriminant Analysis
Education, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
A statistical model of dietetic intern selection was developed from a profile of selection criteria that was obtained in a 1988 survey of Canadian graduate dietetic internship directors. The model was composed of four clusters of variables that resulted from the most frequently used selection criteria: academic performance, work experience, communication skills, and extracurricular activities. Data from a convenience sample of 39 dietetic intern applicants were analyzed, using principal components analysis and discriminant analysis, to test the model's power to predict success in obtaining an internship appointment. In descending order, the criteria with the greatest predictive powers were: academic performance; extracurricular activities; and supervisory, teaching, or instructing types of work experience. The model accounted for 41% of the differences between those who were successful and those who were not successful in obtaining internship appointments in 1989 and correctly classified 30 of 39 subjects. These results provide baseline data on the predictive power of some criteria used for selecting dietetic interns. These findings suggest the need for a replication study with a randomized national sample to crossvalidate the results obtained in this exploratory research.
PubMed ID
10111390 View in PubMed
Less detail

Unsuccessful dietetic internship applicants: a descriptive survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123766
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(2):e248-e252
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jennifer Brady
Annie Hoang
Roula Tzianetas
Jennifer Buccino
Kayla Glynn
Jacqui Gingras
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(2):e248-e252
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Data Collection
Dietetics - education
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - statistics & numerical data
Male
Models, Statistical
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the demographic characteristics of applicants who applied and were unsuccessful in securing an internship position, what these applicants did afterward in their efforts to obtain an internship position, and which career paths they pursued. We also searched for any differences in eligibility between applicants who had not obtained an internship position and those who eventually were successful.
A 68-item online survey was administered.
The study sample (n=84) was relatively homogeneous: female (99%), heterosexual (98%), Caucasian (70%), Canadian-born (75%), having English as a first language (73%), multilingual (40%), and having completed a previous degree (29%). Mean self-reported cumulative grade point average (3.35) exceeded the minimum (3.0) required by most Ontario internship programs. Over 25% eventually secured an internship position. Applicants who rated their packages strong in community nutrition were less successful in attaining an internship. Little difference in qualification was found between those who were eventually successful and not-yet-successful applicants.
Unsuccessful applicants met academic and other requirements for admission to dietetic internship programs in Ontario. Insufficient training opportunities, costs associated with internship, and competition may be contributing to a loss of human potential in dietetics.
PubMed ID
22668842 View in PubMed
Less detail

US and Canadian pharmacy residencies and fellowships: 1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214140
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 1995 Oct;29(10):1028-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
L K Ohri
K T Pincus
H T Brantley
Author Affiliation
Pharmacy Practice Department, School of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178, USA.
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 1995 Oct;29(10):1028-34
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Pharmacy, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Fellowships and Scholarships - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
To report statistical information about pharmacy postgraduate experiential training programs in the US and Canada.
RESFILE-95 database.
A questionnaire is mailed annually to the contact listed for each residency or fellowship in the RESFILE database. The data for this report were entered into the database between June and December 1994. The information obtained on the survey includes (1) program type and accreditation status, (2) primary focus of the program, (3) number of positions, (4) stipend, (5) availability to BS graduates.
Six hundred sixty-eight programs are listed in the RESFILE database, including 540 residences (70% accredited and 30% nonaccredited) and 128 fellowships. Fifty programs are located in Canada. There are a total of 1070 positions available, with a mean of 1.6 positions per program. Pharmacy practice residencies constitute 55% of accredited residencies in the US. General hospital residencies account for 88% of Canadian programs. Primary/ambulatory care residencies are the most common specialty focus. Infectious disease is the most common fellowship focus. The mean stipend for all programs is $24,837. Overall, at least 90% of the responding programs offer specified benefits. Forty-eight percent of the residency programs are available to BS graduates; most fellowships are not. Having completed a previous generalist residency is frequently preferred but often is not required to perform a specialty residency or fellowship.
The statistical data in this report will be useful to those assessing the role of postgraduate experiential training, institutions in the process of developing a residency or fellowship, and those considering application to enter such programs.
Notes
Erratum In: Ann Pharmacother 1995 Dec;29(12):1304
PubMed ID
8845541 View in PubMed
Less detail