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Access to internet in rural and remote Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264077
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Leanne M Currie
Charlene Ronquillo
Tania Dick
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - ethnology
Computer Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Health Information - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Canada is the second largest landmass country in the world, but has one of the lowest population densities. As of 2011, approximately 19% of the Canadian population lives in rural, or remote communities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in rural and urban access to the Internet and device use in Canada, and to explore differences in access to broadband between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in Canada. In general rural-dwellers had lower levels of Internet access and despite efforts to increase access to high speed Internet, Aboriginal communities in some regions have limited access. Future research should explore computer and health literacy in the context of rural and remote communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
24943574 View in PubMed
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Adolescent neck and shoulder pain--the association with depression, physical activity, screen-based activities, and use of health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262816
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Kjell Morten Stormark
Mari Hysing
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Cell Phones - utilization
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Motor Activity
Neck Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Television - utilization
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services.
Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses.
Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p
PubMed ID
24746679 View in PubMed
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An Evaluation of In-Person and Online Engagement in Central Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277010
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Peter Wilton
Doreen Neville
Rick Audas
Heather Brown
Roger Chafe
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluates the use of in-person focus groups and online engagement within the context of a large public engagement initiative conducted in rural Newfoundland.
Participants were surveyed about their engagement experience and demographic information. Pre and post key informant interviews were also conducted with organizers of the initiative.
Of the 111 participants in the focus groups, 97 (87%) completed evaluation surveys; as did 23 (88%) out of 26 online engagement participants. Overall, focus group participants were positive about their involvement, with 87.4% reporting that they would participate in a similar initiative. Online participation was below expectations and these participants viewed their experience less positively than in-person participants. Organizers viewed the engagement initiative and the combined use of online and in-person engagement positively.
This study presents a real-world example of the use of two methods of engagement. It also highlights the importance of the successful execution of whatever engagement mechanism is selected.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26742117 View in PubMed
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An Internet study of cybersex participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70666
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Jun;34(3):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Kristian Daneback
Al Cooper
Sven-Axel Månsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. kristian.daneback@socwork.gu.se
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Jun;34(3):321-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Masturbation
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Abstract
Cybersex is a subcategory of online sexual activities (OSA) and is defined as when two or more people are engaging in sexual talk while online for the purposes of sexual pleasure and may or may not include masturbation. Cybersex is a growing phenomenon with a significant impact on participants but very little research has been done on this subject to date. This study is the first to attempt to delineate characteristics of those who engage in cybersex. Data were collected through an online questionnaire in Swedish, administered through the Swedish web portal Passagen.se. Out of the total sample (N = 1828), almost a third, both men and women, reported to have engaged in cybersex. A logistic regression analysis showed that age, sex, and sexual orientation were important demographic variables to consider when investigating cybersex. A comparison of interval data showed those engaging in cybersex to have a higher likelihood of spending more time online for OSA and having more offline sex partners than those not engaging in cybersex.
PubMed ID
15971014 View in PubMed
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Are computer and cell phone use associated with body mass index and overweight? A population study among twin adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164971
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hanna-Reetta Lajunen
Anna Keski-Rahkonen
Lea Pulkkinen
Richard J Rose
Aila Rissanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Dept of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. hanna-reetta.lajunen@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:24
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Cellular Phone - utilization
Computers - utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Internet - utilization
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Overweight - physiology
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Overweight in children and adolescents has reached dimensions of a global epidemic during recent years. Simultaneously, information and communication technology use has rapidly increased.
A population-based sample of Finnish twins born in 1983-1987 (N = 4098) was assessed by self-report questionnaires at 17 y during 2000-2005. The association of overweight (defined by Cole's BMI-for-age cut-offs) with computer and cell phone use and ownership was analyzed by logistic regression and their association with BMI by linear regression models. The effect of twinship was taken into account by correcting for clustered sampling of families. All models were adjusted for gender, physical exercise, and parents' education and occupational class.
The proportion of adolescents who did not have a computer at home decreased from 18% to 8% from 2000 to 2005. Compared to them, having a home computer (without an Internet connection) was associated with a higher risk of overweight (odds ratio 2.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.8) and BMI (beta coefficient 0.57, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.98). However, having a computer with an Internet connection was not associated with weight status. Belonging to the highest quintile (OR 1.8 95% CI 1.2 to 2.8) and second-highest quintile (OR 1.6 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4) of weekly computer use was positively associated with overweight. The proportion of adolescents without a personal cell phone decreased from 12% to 1% across 2000 to 2005. There was a positive linear trend of increasing monthly phone bill with BMI (beta 0.18, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.30), but the association of a cell phone bill with overweight was very weak.
Time spent using a home computer was associated with an increased risk of overweight. Cell phone use correlated weakly with BMI. Increasing use of information and communication technology may be related to the obesity epidemic among adolescents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17324280 View in PubMed
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Assessing support needs of caregivers of persons with dementia: who wants what?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194138
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2001 Jun;37(3):231-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
A. Colantonio
C. Cohen
M. Pon
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. angela.colantonio@utoronto.ca
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2001 Jun;37(3):231-43
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - nursing
Female
Health Care Surveys
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Internet - utilization
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Periodicals as Topic - utilization
Social Support
Telephone - utilization
Abstract
This paper documents the use and interest in support strategies such as telephone support, newsletters, and computer services, among caregivers of all ages. Data obtained from telephone interviews with community living caregivers of persons with dementia (n = 148) showed substantial interest in the use of these types of services. Using a theoretical framework, this paper identifies caregiver and care-receiver characteristics associated with those interested in the utilization of these support strategies. The implications of these findings for program planning and future research are discussed.
PubMed ID
11440424 View in PubMed
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Barebacking among men who have sex with men recruited through a Swedish website: associations with sexual activities at last sexual encounter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114971
Source
Euro Surveill. 2013;18(13)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
R C Berg
R. Tikkanen
M W Ross
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Health Services, Oslo, Norway. rib@nokc.no
Source
Euro Surveill. 2013;18(13)
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV Infections - epidemiology - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Services
Internet - utilization
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Patient Selection
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sexual Partners
Sexually transmitted diseases
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The research topic of barebacking emerged in the mid-1990s. Since then, a multitude of studies, largely from the United States, have produced invaluable knowledge of factors that help explain the behaviour among men who have sex with men (MSM), and that may contribute to HIV risk reduction programming and advice to counsellors working with barebackers. Given the scant empirical research about barebacking among European MSM, we conducted a survey among 3,634 MSM recruited through a web community in Nordic countries. The objectives of the study were twofold: to describe the sexual activities associated with barebacking behaviour at last sexual encounter, and to evaluate the relationship of barebacking with relevant variables. Men who reported barebacking (n=356) and men who did not (n=3,278) were compared. On the basis of the results of the analyses, the socio-sexual profile of barebackers drawn was one that is at increased risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections due to their sexual practices, particularly unprotected anal intercourse, but also group sex and rimming. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the likelihood of engaging in barebacking was higher for MSM who reported more frequent HIV testing (odds ratio (OR)=5.16), a higher number of female sex partners (OR=16.80), using gay cruising places (OR=1.51) and gay chat rooms (OR=2.11).
PubMed ID
23557973 View in PubMed
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Canadian orthodontist Internet user profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170944
Source
Angle Orthod. 2006 Jan;76(1):92-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Neal G Palmer
James R Yacyshyn
Herbert C Northcott
Brian Nebbe
Carlos Flores-Mir
Paul W Major
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Angle Orthod. 2006 Jan;76(1):92-7
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Dental Staff - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Orthodontics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
An anonymous, self-administered, mail-out survey of Canadian Orthodontists was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of orthodontic Internet use. The response rate was 45.6% (304 of 667). A total of 76.6% of orthodontists reported having Internet access at work, and an additional 12.4% reported having Internet access from a different location. Statistically significant associations between Internet usage and office staff size (P
PubMed ID
16448275 View in PubMed
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Canadian physical therapists' interest in web-based and computer-assisted continuing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176034
Source
Phys Ther. 2005 Mar;85(3):226-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Sunita Mathur
Sue Stanton
W Darlene Reid
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia, T325-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5. smathur@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Phys Ther. 2005 Mar;85(3):226-37
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
CD-ROM - utilization
Canada
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Education, Continuing - methods
Education, Distance - methods
Humans
Internet - utilization
Logistic Models
Physical Therapy Specialty - classification - education - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
Distance education via computer-assisted learning (CAL), including Web-based and CD-ROM learning, confers a number of advantages compared with traditional learning methods. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the interest of Canadian physical therapists in participating in continuing education using CAL methods and (2) to determine whether interest in CAL was related to type of employment, area of practice, education, computer skill and access, and other demographic variables.
A random sample of Canadian physical therapists and all members of cardiopulmonary interest groups were surveyed.
Of 1,426 survey questionnaires mailed, 69 were returned (58 were unopened and 11 were duplicates). From the remaining 1,357 potential survey responses, 757 responses were received, for an overall response rate of 56%. Seventy-eight percent of the respondents indicated their interest in participating in CAL. Factors associated with interest in CAL included 2 or more hours of Internet access per week, Internet access at both home and work, computer skill, education level, practice area, and belonging to a cardiopulmonary interest group.
The findings indicate a large positive interest in CAL. Increasing CAL continuing education opportunities could increase options for physical therapists to meet professional expectations for continuing competency.
PubMed ID
15733047 View in PubMed
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126 records – page 1 of 13.