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An evaluation of the quality of epilepsy education on the Canadian World Wide Web.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172097
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2006 Feb;8(1):299-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Jorge G Burneo
Author Affiliation
Epilepsy Programme, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. jburneo2@uwo.ca
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2006 Feb;8(1):299-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Epilepsy
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Information Services - standards
Internet - standards
Patient Education as Topic - methods - standards
Abstract
Despite the substantial amount of epilepsy-related information available on the Internet, little is known about its quality. Epilepsy-related information in English on the Canadian Internet was reviewed.
Popular search engines (google.ca, yahoo.ca, ca.altavista.com, simpatico.msn.ca) were interrogated. Web sites aimed primarily at patient and family education, geared toward human epilepsy, and epilepsy in general as opposed to one specific type or aspect of epilepsy, were included. Web sites were then subdivided in to proprietary (directly sponsored by the industry) and nonproprietary, and evaluated according to compliance with the principles of the Health on the Net (HON) Foundation Code of Conduct. Web sites without comprehensive contents were excluded. Comparison between total scores was done using the rank test. Categorized descriptors were assessed with t tests.
Five proprietary and fourteen nonproprietary websites were identified. None of them were compliant with all eight principles of the HON code. The average number of principles with which these sites were in compliance was 3.3 (range: 1-6.5, P = 0.4, proprietary vs nonproprietary).
The Internet has the potential to be a very powerful educational tool for patients with epilepsy. However, most of the easily accessed epilepsy web sites do not comply with accepted standards for health web sites.
PubMed ID
16275110 View in PubMed
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Comparison of interventional cardiology in two European countries: a nationwide Internet based registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118194
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 30;168(2):1237-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2013
Author
T. Gudnason
G S Gudnadottir
B. Lagerqvist
K. Eyjolfsson
T. Nilsson
G. Thorgeirsson
K. Andersen
S. James
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Landspitali University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Cardiovascular Research Institute of Landspitali and the University of Iceland, Iceland; University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: thorgudn@landspitali.is.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 30;168(2):1237-42
Date
Sep-30-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiology - methods - standards
Coronary Angiography - methods - standards
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Internet - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - methods - standards
Prospective Studies
Radiography, Interventional - methods - standards
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The practice of interventional cardiology differs between countries and regions. In this study we report the results of the first nation-wide long-term comparison of interventional cardiology in two countries using a common web-based registry.
The Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR) was used to prospectively and continuously collect background-, quality-, and outcome parameters for all coronary angiographies (CA) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed in Iceland and Sweden during one year.
The rate of CA per million inhabitants was higher in Iceland than in Sweden. A higher proportion of patients had CA for stable angina in Iceland than in Sweden, while the opposite was true for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Left main stem stenosis was more commonly found in Iceland than in Sweden. The PCI rate was similar in the two countries as was the general success rate of PCI, achievement of complete revascularisation and the overall stent use. Drug eluting stents were more commonly used in Iceland (23% vs. 19%). The use of fractional flow reserve (0.2% vs. 10%) and the radial approach (0.6% vs. 33%) was more frequent in Sweden than in Iceland. Serious complications and death were very rare in both countries.
By prospectively comparing interventional cardiology in two countries, using a common web based registry online, we have discovered important differences in technique and indications. A discovery such as this can lead to a change in clinical practice and inspire prospective multinational randomised registry trials in unselected, real world populations.
PubMed ID
23232456 View in PubMed
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Conducting a client-focused survey using e-mail.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177619
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Catherine Yetter Read
Author Affiliation
William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA. readca@.edu.
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):83-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electronic Mail - standards
Health Surveys
Heterozygote
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internet - standards
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Phenylketonurias - genetics - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires - standards
Research Design - standards
Research Personnel - psychology
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
An e-mail listserv was used to recruit participants, administer a survey, send electronic gift certificates, and disseminate the findings of a study of psychological responses to being a carrier of the gene for phenylketonuria, a rare genetic disease. The majority of responses to the call for participants were received within the first 24 hours, and most surveys (n = 83) were returned via e-mail within 5 days. The use of e-mail allowed more opportunities for researcher-participant interaction than Web-based surveys, but the return rate of 51% may reflect concerns about privacy when e-mail addresses are required.
PubMed ID
15520570 View in PubMed
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Consumer e-health education in HIV/AIDS: a pilot study of a web-based video workshop.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170517
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2006;6:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Laura A O'Grady
Author Affiliation
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. laura.ogrady@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2006;6:10
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - therapy
Adult
Audiovisual Aids
Complementary Therapies - education
Education, Distance - standards
Educational Technology
Efficiency
Feedback
HIV Infections - therapy
Health Education - methods - standards
Humans
Information Services - standards - utilization
Internet - standards
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
User-Computer Interface
Videotape Recording - standards
Abstract
Members of the HIV/AIDS community are known to use web-based tools to support learning about treatment issues. Initial research indicated components such as message forums or web-based documentation were effectively used by persons with HIV/AIDS. Video has also shown promise as a technology to aid consumer health education. However, no research has been published thus far investigating the impact of web-based environments combining these components in an educational workshop format.
In this qualitative study HIV/AIDS community members provided feedback on an integrated web-based consumer health education environment. Participants were recruited through organizations that serve the HIV/AIDS community located in Toronto, Canada. Demographics, data on Internet use, including messages exchanged in the study environment were collected. A group interview provided feedback on usability of the study environment, preferences for information formats, use of the message forum, and other sources for learning about treatment information.
In this pilot study analysis of the posted messages did not demonstrate use for learning of the workshop content. Participants did not generally find the environment of value for learning about treatment information. However, participants did share how they were meeting these needs. It was indicated that a combination of resources are being used to find and discuss treatment information, including in-person sources.
More research on the ways in which treatment information needs are being met by HIV/AIDS community members and how technology fits in this process is necessary before investing large amounts of money into web-based interventions. Although this study had a limited number of participants, the findings were unexpected and, therefore, of interest to those who intend to implement online consumer health education initiatives or interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16504148 View in PubMed
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The DARTS tool for assessing online medicines information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155185
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2008 Dec;30(6):898-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Ulla Närhi
Marika Pohjanoksa-Mäntylä
Anna Karjalainen
Johanna K Saari
Hannes Wahlroos
Marja S Airaksinen
Simon J Bell
Author Affiliation
European Commission, Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry, Unit F/2, Avenue l'Auderghem 45, Brussels, Belgium. ulla.narhi@ec.europa.eu
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2008 Dec;30(6):898-906
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Information Services - standards
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Humans
Internet - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quality of Health Care
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of the Internet as a source of medicines information is increasing. However, the quality of online information is highly variable. Equipping Internet users to distinguish good quality information is the aim of a new five-item quality assessment tool (DARTS) that was developed by the Working Group on Information to Patients under the Pharmaceutical Forum established by the European Commission. The objective of this study was to investigate how people with depression assess the quality of online medicines information and to study their opinions about the DARTS tool in assisting in this process.
Focus group discussions with Internet users were conducted in metropolitan Helsinki, Finland.
Six focus group discussions (67-109 min duration) were conducted with people with depression (n = 29). The DARTS tool was used as a stimulus after open discussion in relation to the evaluation of the quality of Internet-based medicines information. The focus groups were digitally audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were thematically content analysed by two researchers.
Focus group participants were generally critical of the information they retrieved. However, few participants systematically applied quality assessment criteria when retrieving online information. No participants had knowledge or experience of any quality assessment tools. The DARTS tool was perceived as being concise and easy to use and understand. Many participants indicated it would allay some of their concerns related to information quality and act as a reminder. While several participants felt the tool should not be any more extensive, some of them believed it should include a more in-depth explanation to accompany each of the quality criteria.
The DARTS tool may act as a prompt for people with depression to assess the quality of online information they obtain. The five DARTS criteria may form the basis of a systematic approach to quality assessment and the tool may also act as a reminder of quality issues in general. Further studies are needed to assess the actual value of the DARTS tool as well as its value in relation to other quality assessment instruments.
PubMed ID
18791806 View in PubMed
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A descriptive study of registered nurses' experiences with web-based learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187859
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Nov;40(4):457-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Lynda Atack
James Rankin
Author Affiliation
Centennial College, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. latack@centennialcollege.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Nov;40(4):457-65
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Canada
Computer User Training - standards
Computer-Assisted Instruction - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Distance - standards
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internet - standards
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Professional Competence - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
To describe the experiences of registered nurses (RNs) who enrolled in a web-based course from either their home or the workplace.
In order to maintain competency in rapidly changing health care systems, and meet the challenge of overcoming traditional barriers to continuing education, RNs need access to innovative educational delivery methods. As yet, little is known about the web-based learners' experience, particularly when courses are accessed from the nursing practice setting.
The article focuses on the results from questionnaires conducted with 57 RNs enrolled in a web-based, postdiploma course. These findings emanate from a larger study using survey method and focus group interviews. Nurses' experiences were measured using the Online Learner Support Instrument which was developed and tested for use in the study.
Most nurses found the course highly satisfactory. Not all experiences were positive however, and a number of challenges were faced. Access to the course from home was reported as very satisfactory for the majority, while work users encountered a number of serious barriers such as insufficient time and limited computer access. The RNs made significant gains in their learning with e-mail, Internet, keyboarding and word processing skills during the 16-week course. Lack of computer skills, erroneous perceptions of course workload and inadequate preparation for web learning were largely responsible for the majority of withdrawals.
Web-based learning can be an effective mode of delivery for nursing education. Advance preparation by educational institutions, employers and prospective students is essential. Teachers, peers, technology, course design and the learning environment are key variables that influence the learners' experience and success.
PubMed ID
12421405 View in PubMed
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Development, implementation and pilot evaluation of a Web-based Virtual Patient Case Simulation environment--Web-SP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82716
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Zary Nabil
Johnson Gunilla
Boberg Jonas
Fors Uno G H
Author Affiliation
Dept of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Nabil.Zary@ki.se
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:10
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Computer Graphics
Computer Simulation - standards
Computer-Assisted Instruction - standards
Consumer Satisfaction
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods - standards
Humans
Internet - standards
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Web-based Simulation of Patients (Web-SP) project was initiated in order to facilitate the use of realistic and interactive virtual patients (VP) in medicine and healthcare education. Web-SP focuses on moving beyond the technology savvy teachers, when integrating simulation-based education into health sciences curricula, by making the creation and use of virtual patients easier. The project strives to provide a common generic platform for design/creation, management, evaluation and sharing of web-based virtual patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if it was possible to develop a web-based virtual patient case simulation environment where the entire case authoring process might be handled by teachers and which would be flexible enough to be used in different healthcare disciplines. RESULTS: The Web-SP system was constructed to support easy authoring, management and presentation of virtual patient cases. The case authoring environment was found to facilitate for teachers to create full-fledged patient cases without the assistance of computer specialists. Web-SP was successfully implemented at several universities by taking into account key factors such as cost, access, security, scalability and flexibility. Pilot evaluations in medical, dentistry and pharmacy courses shows that students regarded Web-SP as easy to use, engaging and to be of educational value. Cases adapted for all three disciplines were judged to be of significant educational value by the course leaders. CONCLUSION: The Web-SP system seems to fulfil the aim of providing a common generic platform for creation, management and evaluation of web-based virtual patient cases. The responses regarding the authoring environment indicated that the system might be user-friendly enough to appeal to a majority of the academic staff. In terms of implementation strengths, Web-SP seems to fulfil most needs from course directors and teachers from various educational institutions and disciplines. The system is currently in use or under implementation in several healthcare disciplines at more than ten universities worldwide. Future aims include structuring the exchange of cases between teachers and academic institutions by building a VP library function. We intend to follow up the positive results presented in this paper with other studies looking at the learning outcomes, critical thinking and patient management. Studying the potential of Web-SP as an assessment tool will also be performed. More information about Web-SP: http://websp.lime.ki.se.
PubMed ID
16504041 View in PubMed
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Evaluating a Web-based graduate level nursing ethics course: thumbs up or thumbs down?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174849
Source
J Contin Educ Nurs. 2002 Jan-Feb;33(1):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather McAlpine
Linda Lockerbie
Deyanne Ramsay
Sue Beaman
Author Affiliation
University of New Brunswick, Saint John, NewBrunswick, Canada.
Source
J Contin Educ Nurs. 2002 Jan-Feb;33(1):12-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Canada
Clinical Competence
Computer-Assisted Instruction - standards
Decision Making
Education, Distance - standards
Education, Nursing, Graduate - standards
Ethics, Nursing - education
Faculty, Nursing
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internet - standards
Nursing Education Research
Program Evaluation
Students, Nursing - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
This article discusses the course design, experiential findings, and evaluation of a Web-based course for graduate nurses examining professional health care practice and ethical issues.
Using course input and evaluative data, the article addresses student and teacher perceptions of use of a Web-based delivery mode for graduate level courses and the appropriateness of this ethics course for graduate level students.
Evaluative data supported existing knowledge concerning pros and cons of Web-based education. New insights concerning the Web's ability to foster critical thinking skills and supports for continuing ethics education for nurses are reported. All students assessed this ethics course as being of considerable value to their professional practice.
Students evaluated the pros of Web use for the course as far outweighing the cons. The students' substantial interest in and critical thinking about appropriate knowledge bases to underpin effective ethical decision-making strongly supports the need for continuing ethics education for practicing nurses.
PubMed ID
15887355 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of Norwegian cancer hospitals web sites and explorative survey among cancer patients on their use of the internet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19374
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2001 Oct-Dec;3(4):E30
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Norum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, University Hospital of Tromsø, N-9038 Tromsø, Norway. jan.norum@telemed.no
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2001 Oct-Dec;3(4):E30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Computers
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Cancer Care Facilities - organization & administration - standards
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Female
Health Care Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Services - standards - trends
Internet - standards - trends
Lymphoma - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oncology Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Palliative Care
Patient Education
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hospital homepages should provide comprehensive information on the hospital's services, such as departments and treatments available, prices, waiting time, leisure facilities, and other information important for patients and their relatives. Norway, with its population of approximately 4.3 million, ranks among the top countries globally for its ability to absorb and use technology. It is unclear to what degree Norwegian hospitals and patients use the Internet for information about health services. OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to evaluate the quality of the biggest Norwegian cancer hospitals Web sites and to gather some preliminary data on patients use of the Internet. METHODS: In January 2001, we analyzed Web sites of 5 of the 7 biggest Norwegian hospitals treating cancer patients using a scoring system. The scoring instrument was based on recommendations developed by the Norwegian Central Information Service for Web sites and reflects the scope and depth of service information offered on hospital Web pages. In addition, 31 cancer patients visiting one hospital-based medical oncologist were surveyed about their use of the Internet. RESULTS: Of the 7 hospitals, 5 had a Web site. The Web sites differed markedly in quality. Types of information included - and number of Web sites that included each type of information - were, for example: search option, 1; interpreter service, 2; date of last update, 2; postal address, phone number, and e-mail service, 3; information in English, 2. None of the Web sites included information on waiting time or prices. Of the 31 patients surveyed, 12 had personal experience using the Internet and 4 had searched for medical information. The Internet users were significantly younger (mean age 47.8 years, range 28.4-66.8 years) than the nonusers (mean age 61.8 years, range 33.1-90.0 years) (P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: The hospitals Web sites offer cancer patients and relatives useful information, but the Web sites were not impressive.
PubMed ID
11772545 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.