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3rd Nordic Meeting on Genetics and Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122296
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2012 Aug;76(2):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Marie Wahren-Herlenius
Anna Fogdell-Hahn
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2012 Aug;76(2):75-6
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Humans
Inflammation - genetics - immunology
Internet
Sweden
PubMed ID
22830591 View in PubMed
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Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
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Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaare Meier
Lone Nikolajsen
Morten Flink
Ronnie Simonsen
Ioanna Milidou
Troels Staehelin Jensen
Jens Christian Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Anesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; ITmedico, Aarhus, Denmark; Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - therapy
Computer Security
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Employment
Humans
Internet
Neuralgia - drug therapy - therapy
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Software
Spinal Cord Stimulation - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
?? Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is increasingly gaining widespread use as a treatment for chronic pain. A widely used electronic registry could play a pivotal role in improving this complex and cost-?intensive treatment. We aimed to construct a comprehensive, universally available data base for SCS.
?? The design considerations behind a new online data base for SCS are presented; basic structure, technical issues, research applications, and future perspectives are described.
?? The Aarhus Neuromodulation Database covers core SCS treatment parameters, including procedure-?related details and complications, and features recording of key success parameters such as pain intensity, work status, and quality of life. It combines easy access to patient information with exhaustive data extraction options, and it can readily be adapted and expanded to suit different needs, including other neuromodulation treatment modalities.
?? We believe that the data base described in this article offers a powerful and versatile data collection tool suited for both clinicians and researchers in the field. The basic data base structure is immediately available on a no?-cost basis, and we invite our colleagues to make use of the data base as part of the efforts to further the field of neuromodulation.
PubMed ID
22882331 View in PubMed
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Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274081
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Åke Olofsson
Karin Taube
Astrid Ahl
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Dyslexia - diagnosis - psychology
Education, Nursing
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Multilingualism
Reading
Sweden
Teaching
Universities
Writing
Young Adult
Abstract
Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students.
PubMed ID
26459832 View in PubMed
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Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a web-based community reinforcement approach for substance use disorders with treatment-seeking American Indians/Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270301
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):393-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Aimee N C Campbell
Eva Turrigiano
Michelle Moore
Gloria M Miele
Traci Rieckmann
Mei-Chen Hu
Frankie Kropp
Roz Ringor-Carty
Edward V Nunes
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):393-403
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Longstanding disparities in substance use disorders and treatment access exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Computerized, web-delivered interventions have potential to increase access to quality treatment and improve patient outcomes. Prior research supports the efficacy of a web-based version [therapeutic education system (TES)] of the community reinforcement approach to improve outcomes among outpatients in substance abuse treatment; however, TES has not been tested among AI/AN. The results from this mixed method acceptability study among a diverse sample of urban AI/AN (N = 40) show that TES was acceptable across seven indices (range 7.8-9.4 on 0-10 scales with 10 indicating highest acceptability). Qualitative interviews suggest adaptation specific to AI/AN culture could improve adoption. Additional efforts to adapt TES and conduct a larger effectiveness study are warranted.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;165(7):881-818450927
PubMed ID
25022913 View in PubMed
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Access and interest: two important issues in considering the feasibility of web-assisted tobacco interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154400
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - methods
Telephone
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous research has found that current smokers are less likely to have access to the Internet than nonsmokers. As access to the Internet continues to expand, does this finding remain true? Also, how many smokers are interested in Web-assisted tobacco interventions (WATIs)? These questions are important to determine the potential role that WATIs might play in promoting tobacco cessation.
The aims of the study were to determine whether smokers are less likely than nonsmokers to have access to the Internet and to establish the level of interest in WATIs among a representative sample of smokers.
A random digit dialing telephone survey was conducted of 8467 adult respondents, 18 years and older, in Ontario, Canada from September 2006 to August 2007. All respondents were asked their smoking status and whether they used the Internet (at home or work in the past 12 months; where; how often in the past 12 months). To assess the level of interest in WATIs, current daily smokers were asked whether they would be interested in a confidential program that they could access on the Internet, free of charge, that would allow them to check their smoking and compare it to other Canadians.
Smokers were marginally less likely to have used the Internet than nonsmokers (74% vs 81% in the last year), and, of those who had access to the Internet, smokers used the Internet less often than nonsmokers. Overall, 40% of smokers said they would be interested in a WATI. The number of cigarettes smoked per day was unrelated to level of interest in the WATI, but time to first cigarette after waking was. Smokers who used the Internet were more interested in the WATI than smokers who did not use the Internet (46% vs 20%).
While the difference in level of Internet use between smokers and nonsmokers was greatly reduced compared to 2002 and 2004 data, smokers still remain marginally less likely to use the Internet than nonsmokers. Overall, there was a substantial level of interest in the WATI among smokers, in particular among smokers who currently use the Internet. These results indicate that WATIs have a substantial potential audience among smokers, and, given the growing body of evidence regarding their efficacy, there is growing support that WATIs have a significant role to play in promoting tobacco cessation.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2006 Jan;75(1):110-616125450
PubMed ID
18984558 View in PubMed
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Access to internet in rural and remote Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264077
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Leanne M Currie
Charlene Ronquillo
Tania Dick
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - ethnology
Computer Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Health Information - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Canada is the second largest landmass country in the world, but has one of the lowest population densities. As of 2011, approximately 19% of the Canadian population lives in rural, or remote communities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in rural and urban access to the Internet and device use in Canada, and to explore differences in access to broadband between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in Canada. In general rural-dwellers had lower levels of Internet access and despite efforts to increase access to high speed Internet, Aboriginal communities in some regions have limited access. Future research should explore computer and health literacy in the context of rural and remote communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
24943574 View in PubMed
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[Access to own health information and services on the Internet by disability pensioners and other citizens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91436
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Halldórsdóttir Gyda
Thoroddsen Asta St
Author Affiliation
Heilsuneti ehf. gyda@heilsunet.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Date
Nov-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Health Information
Disabled Persons - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Iceland
Insurance, Disability
Internet
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pensions
Perception
Questionnaires
Social Security
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study Icelandic citizens' perception, attitude and preferences regarding access to own health information and interactive services at the State Social Security Institute of Iceland (SSSI). Hypotheses regarding differences between disability pensioners and other citizens were put forward. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive mail survey was performed with a random sample from the Icelandic population, 1400 individuals, age 16 to 67, divided into two groups of 700 each: (1) persons entitled to disability pension (2) other citizens in Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 56 questions, descriptive statistics were used and Chi square for comparison with 95% as confidence level of significance. Response rate was 34.9%. RESULTS: Perception of rights to access own's health information was significantly higher by pensioners than other citizens. Attitude concerning impact of access was in general positive, with pensioners significantly more positive about effectiveness, perception of health, communication and decisions owing to services, access at SSSI, maintaining health records and controlling access. CONCLUSIONS: The study, the first of its kind in Iceland, supports previous research. The results, as well as foreign models of research projects, are recommended to be used for evolution of electronic health services and researching employees' viewpoints. Future research in Iceland should address the impact of interactive health communication on quality of life, health and services' efficiency.
PubMed ID
18974434 View in PubMed
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1367 records – page 1 of 137.