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521 records – page 1 of 53.

(3)H activity comparison between FTMC, VNIIM and LNE-LNHB.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278451
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Philippe Cassette
Paulius Butkus
Arunas Gudelis
Tatiana Shilnikova
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
France
Internationality
Laboratories - standards
Lithuania
Nuclear Medicine - standards
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Scintillation Counting
Sensitivity and specificity
Tritium - analysis - standards
Abstract
An activity comparison of tritiated water was organized in 2013 between 3 laboratories: FTMC (Lithuania), LNE-LNHB (France) and VNIIM (Russia). The solution was prepared by LNHB and ampoules were sent to the others laboratories. This solution was standardized in terms of activity per unit mass by participant laboratories using the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method in liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The tritiated water solution is traceable to the solution prepared by LNHB for the CCRI(II)-K2.H-3 2009 (3)H international comparison.
PubMed ID
26651170 View in PubMed
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45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5-7 October 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283198
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2017 Feb;39(1):208-341
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2017

Abortion and neonaticide: ethics, practice, and policy in four nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58480
Source
Bioethics. 2002 Jun;16(3):202-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Michael L Gross
Author Affiliation
Department of Political Science, The University of Haifa, Mt. Carmel, Haifa, Israel. mgross@poli.haifa.ac.il
Source
Bioethics. 2002 Jun;16(3):202-30
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities
Abortion, Eugenic
Abortion, Legal
Adult
Comparative Study
Decision Making
Denmark
Developed Countries
Ethical Analysis
Euthanasia, Passive
Female
Fetus
Great Britain
Health Care Rationing
Homicide
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Internationality
Israel
Parents
Personhood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Public Policy
Quality of Life
Resuscitation
Social Values
United States
Value of Life
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Abortion, particularly later-term abortion, and neonaticide, selective non-treatment of newborns, are feasible management strategies for fetuses or newborns diagnosed with severe abnormalities. However, policy varies considerably among developed nations. This article examines abortion and neonatal policy in four nations: Israel, the US, the UK and Denmark. In Israel, late-term abortion is permitted while non-treatment of newborns is prohibited. In the US, on the other hand, later-term abortion is severely restricted, while treatment to newborns may be withdrawn. Policy in the UK and Denmark bridges some of these gaps with liberal abortion and neonatal policy. Disparate policy within and between nations creates practical and ethical difficulties. Practice diverges from policy as many practitioners find it difficult to adhere to official policy. Ethically, it is difficult to entirely justify perinatal policy in these nations. In each nation, there are elements of ethically sound policy, while other aspects cannot be defended. Ethical policy hinges on two underlying normative issues: the question of fetal/newborn status and the morality of killing and letting die. While each issue has been the subject of extensive debate, there are firm ethical norms that should serve as the basis for coherent and consistent perinatal policy. These include 1) a grant of full moral and legal status to the newborn but only partial moral and legal status to the late-term fetus 2) a general prohibition against feticide unless to save the life of the mother or prevent the birth of a fetus facing certain death or severe pain or suffering and 3) a general endorsement of neonaticide subject to a parent's assessment of the newborn's interest broadly defined to consider physical harm as well as social, psychological and or financial harm to related third parties. Policies in each of the nations surveyed diverging from these norms should be the subject of public discourse and, where possible, legislative reform.
PubMed ID
12211246 View in PubMed
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Abortion, breast cancer, and epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22237
Source
N Engl J Med. 1997 Jan 9;336(2):127-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1997

Abortion denied--outcome of mothers and babies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240818
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):361-2, 366
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1984
Author
C. Del Campo
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):361-2, 366
Date
Feb-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion Applicants - psychology
Abortion, Legal
Canada
Child Psychology
Female
Humans
Internationality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Pregnant Women
Notes
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1975 Jul-Aug;7(4):165-711098923
Cites: N Z Med J. 1977 May 25;85(588):424-5271838
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Feb 1;136(3):374-97352527
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Feb 1;145(3):279-846824018
Cites: Sven Lakartidn. 1957 Dec 6;54(49):3709-8413507022
Cites: Nord Med. 1959 Aug 6;62:1182-514403964
PubMed ID
6692231 View in PubMed
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521 records – page 1 of 53.