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IMO-Polar Code : history, content, and shortcomings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297051
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 19 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
standards set for shipping in the polar waters. A mandatory international code applying to ships operating in polar waters has been on the International Maritime Organization (IMO)’s table for a long time. However, it took some time to agree on a comprehensive set of standards for polar waters
  1 document  
Author
Basaran, Ilker
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 19 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1027653
Keywords
International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Shipping
Arctic
Marine environment
Guidelines
Documents

ASC-Paper_Basaran_Ilker.pdf

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Use of human body temperatures for clothing evaluation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102180
Source
Pages 325-328 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
survival suits for~ helicopter transportation. NUTEC, Bergen. N«JWIY NUTEC report No. 43-82. . 5. International Maritime Organization (IMO) R~ LSA 17 /8 and MSC 48/25. . . . !fli 6. Allan D. Survival helicopter ~tching: A~­ for policy-makers. International Joum Safety 1983; 1:291-296. . . ~ 7
  1 document  
Author
PÃ¥sche, A
Pasche, A
Author Affiliation
SINTEF UNIMED, Trondheim, Norway
Source
Pages 325-328 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Body temperature
Core temperature
Clothing
Criteria
Immersion suits
International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Rectal temperature
Skin temperature
Thermal properties
Abstract
Experience shows that clothing manufacturers in their development work base their evaluation of the thermal properties of the clothing, in particular for survival systems, on the changes observed in human core temperatures. Body core temperatures of human test subjects are frequently used to evaluate the thermal protection provided by specific clothing. For survival suits, or immersion suits, international acceptance criteria are based on the changes occurring in a human test subject's core temperature. Unfortunately the core temperature changes observed in test persons in connection with thermal property tests of clothing garments may not necessarily reflect the real thermal quality of the garment. For a comparison test between several suits or garments, performed within a limited time period, the core temperatures may actually be misleading. In a suit providing less insulation, the human test subject is likely to be shivering more and producing more heat. The increased metabolic heat may compensate fully for the higher heat loss from the suit, and no difference would be seen in core (rectal) temperatures. Evaluation of the thermal protection provided by a specific garment should be based on other parameters than only core temperature. Skin temperatures and oxygen consumption should be included in the test criteria.
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