Skip header and navigation

Refine By

118 records – page 1 of 12.

[ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME WITHOUT ST SEGMENT ELEVATION: POSSIBILITIES FOR PREDICTING THE CLINICAL COURSE AT THE POST-HOSPITAL (6 AND 12 MONTHS) STAGE].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275680
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):205-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):205-10
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality
Aged
Calcium - blood
Creatinine - blood
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interleukin-10 - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Melatonin - analogs & derivatives - urine
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Sodium - metabolism
Abstract
To measure blood IL-6, IL-10, creatinine levels, calcium, sodium and potassium in blood and saliva, melatonin in urine of patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation for the prediction of the clinical course at the post-hospital stage.
The study included 93 patients with complicated (n = 46) and uncomplicated (n = 47) coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation. Blood IL-6, IL-1, creatinine levels, calcium, sodium and potassium in blood and saliva, melatoni n in urine were determined on days 1-3 after hospitalization. 6-hydroxymelatonin was measured by HPLC in urine collected between 23 p.m. and 8 a.m., melatonin i in urine collected between 8 a.m. and 23 p.m.
Complicated coronary syndrome was associated with increased levels of melatonin (night), blood IL-10 and Na, salivary, Na and Ca while the uncomplicated condition with increased blood melatonin (daytime), IL-6, creatinine, Ca, Na, K, and salivary K. 90 patients were followed up within 12 months after discharge. End-points developed in 36 (40%) of them. Logistic analysis yielded variables and 2 logistic regression equations The data on night melatonin +5 and +4 were included in ROC analysis. The night melatonin +5 values over 0.7453 were associated with increased risk of complications in the post-hospital period (6 months) and values of 0.7453 or lower with the enhanced probability of uncomplicated clinical course. Prognostic sensitivity was estimated at 90%, specificity at -54.39%. The night melatonin +4 values over 0.2903 were associated with increased risk of complications in the post-hospital period (12 months) and values of 0.2903 or lower with the enhanced probability of uncomplicated clinical course. Prognostic sensitivity was estimated at 77.8%, specificity at -59.26%.
The night melatonin +5 and +4 models can be used to predict the clinical course of acute coronary syndrome during 6 and 12 months of the post-hospitalization period.
PubMed ID
27522726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additive effects of soluble TWEAK and inflammation on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91537
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Jan;4(1):110-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Carrero Juan J
Ortiz Alberto
Qureshi Abdul R
Martín-Ventura Jose L
Bárány Peter
Heimbürger Olof
Marrón Belén
Metry George
Snaedal Sunna
Lindholm Bengt
Egido Jesús
Stenvinkel Peter
Blanco-Colio Luis M
Author Affiliation
Division of Renal Medicine and Baxter Novum, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Jan;4(1):110-8
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - etiology - mortality
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Renal Dialysis - mortality
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tumor Necrosis Factors - blood
Up-Regulation
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an exceptionally high mortality rate, primarily due to cardiovascular disease. Reduced soluble TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) plasma levels have been reported both in patients with subclinical atherosclerosis and CKD. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 218 prevalent patients (121 men; 63 +/- 14 yr) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). sTWEAK levels in relation with the patients' outcome were studied. RESULTS: sTWEAK plasma levels were 208 [(165 to 272) pg/ml, median interquartile range], significantly lower than healthy controls (P 7.0 pg/ml), in whom high sTWEAK strongly predicted cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These results were confirmed in a second cohort of HD patients. CONCLUSIONS: The concurrent presence of elevated sTWEAK plasma concentrations and an inflammatory environment have additive effects on mortality in HD patients. Further studies on the potential different role of sTWEAK in health and disease are warranted.
PubMed ID
18945991 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admission interleukin-6 is associated with post resuscitation organ dysfunction and predicts long-term neurological outcome after out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265459
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Nov;85(11):1573-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Jukka Vaahersalo
Markus B Skrifvars
Kari Pulkki
Mats Stridsberg
Helge Røsjø
Seppo Hovilehto
Marjaana Tiainen
Tero Varpula
Ville Pettilä
Esko Ruokonen
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Nov;85(11):1573-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Female
Finland
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Interleukin-6 - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Organ Failure - blood - mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - blood - mortality - therapy
Patient Admission
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
S100 Proteins - analysis
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - blood - mortality - therapy
Abstract
To study plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and S-100B during intensive care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest from ventricular fibrillation (OHCA-VF), and their associations with the duration of ischemia, organ dysfunction and long-term neurological outcome.
A 12-month prospective observational multicentre study was conducted in 21 Finnish intensive care units in 2011. IL-6, hs-CRP and S-100B were measured at 0-6 h, 24 h, 48 h and 96 h after ICU admission. Associations with the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores divided into tertiles and 12-month cerebral performance category (CPC) were tested.
Of 186 OHCA-VF patients included in the study, 110 (59.1%) patients survived with good neurological outcome (CPC 1-2) 12 months after cardiac arrest. Admission plasma concentrations of IL-6 but not hs-CRP were higher with prolonged time to ROSC (p
PubMed ID
25238742 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2011;80(6):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kirsi Honkalampi
Soili M Lehto
Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
Jukka Hintikka
Leo Niskanen
Minna Valkonen-Korhonen
Heimo Viinamäki
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Psychiatric Center, Kuopio, Finland. kirsi.honkalampi @ kuh.fi
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2011;80(6):359-64
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - immunology - pathology
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cluster analysis
Depression - immunology - pathology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammation - diagnosis - immunology - pathology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Registries
Abstract
Altered immune responses are seen in depression, and recent data suggest that similar changes could also be observable in alexithymia. We examined whether the inflammatory markers high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 are independently related to alexithymia or its factors in a population-based sample.
This study formed a clinical part of the Kuopio Depression (KUDEP) general population study focusing on the mental health of a general population of adults aged 25-64 years (n = 308). Alexithymia was measured using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21).
The levels of IL-6 (in picograms per milliliter) and hs-CRP (in milligrams per liter) were significantly higher in alexithymic than in nonalexithymic subjects (IL-6 effect size, ES: 0.50; hs-CRP ES: 0.27). The BDI scores, hs-CRP and IL-6 explained 33.5% of the variation in TAS scores in the whole study population. According to logistic regression analysis, hs-CRP but not IL-6 increased the likelihood of belonging to the alexithymic group. This observation remained unaltered after additional adjustments for chronic inflammation-related disorders, the use of inflammation-modulating medications and depressive symptoms.
Our findings suggest that the association between hs-CRP and alexithymia resembles that observed in depressed patients. It is, however, independent of depressive symptoms. These findings widen our view on the stress-alexithymia concept.
PubMed ID
21829048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anemia in early rheumatoid arthritis is associated with interleukin 6-mediated bone marrow suppression, but has no effect on disease course or mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86386
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Mar;35(3):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Nikolaisen Cathrin
Figenschau Yngve
Nossent Johannes C
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. cathrin.nikolaisen@unn.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Mar;35(3):380-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - complications - mortality
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - mortality
Blood Sedimentation
Bone Marrow - physiopathology
Female
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most common extraarticular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but there is limited information on the cause and consequences of ACD. We investigated the prevalence, relation with proinflammatory cytokines, and effect on disease outcome of ACD in patients with RA. METHODS: The presence of anemia was analyzed in a cohort of 111 consecutive patients with early RA. Anemia was related to markers of erythropoiesis and inflammation [clinically and by levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha]. The frequency of various disease outcomes during the mean followup of 74 months was compared between ACD and nonanemic patients. RESULTS: ACD was present in 25% during the first year of disease. ACD was associated with higher CRP (45 vs 22 g/l; p = 0.04) and ESR levels (54 vs 33 mm/h; p = 0.002). Hemoglobin levels were inversely correlated with serum erythropoietin (p = 0.003) in univariate analysis, but in multivariate analysis only ESR (p = 0.005) and IL-6 (p = 0.056) remained as independent predictors of hemoglobin levels. Presence of ACD was not associated with later development of disease manifestations or mortality. CONCLUSION: While ACD affected 25% of patients with RA early in the disease course, this had no influence on disease outcome including mortality during the following 6 years. The association between IL-6 and ACD suggests that IL-6-mediated bone marrow suppression is the main mechanism for development of ACD in RA.
PubMed ID
18260177 View in PubMed
Less detail

An increased concentration of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand pre-dates the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287470
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Dec 01;56(12):2190-2196
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Linda Johansson
Lisbeth Ärlestig
Heidi Kokkonen
Mikael Brink
Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Dec 01;56(12):2190-2196
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies - blood
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - diagnosis
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Specimen Banks
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Interleukin-10 - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Prodromal Symptoms
RANK Ligand - blood
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Sweden
Abstract
RANK ligand (RANKL) is involved in destruction and osteoporosis in RA. In this study, the relationships between RANKL and ACPA, anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP), cytokines and chemokines were analysed in individuals before the onset of RA symptoms, and their associations with radiological findings at disease onset were assessed.
This was a case-control study performed within the Medical Biobank of Northern Sweden that included 470 pre-symptomatic individuals [334 women and 136 men; mean (s.d.) age 52.3 (9.4) years] using blood samples donated before symptom onset (pre-dating time; 5.0 years) and 96 controls (60 women and 36 men). Plasma was analysed for RANKL (BioVendor, Karasek, Brno, Czech Republic), anti-CCP2 antibodies (Eurodiagnostics, Malmö, Sweden), anti-CarP antibodies (in-house ELISA), ACPA specificities (ISAC-platform, Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden) and cytokines/chemokines (Meso Scale Discovery methods, Rockville, MD, USA). Radiographs of hands and feet were graded using the Larsen score.
The concentration of RANKL was higher in the pre-symptomatic individuals compared with controls; mean (s.e.m.): 0.50 (0.03) vs 0.22 (0.02) nmol/l (P
PubMed ID
29029341 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anti-inflammatory effect of N-stearoylethanolamine in experimental burn injury in rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98804
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Mar-Apr;81(2):107-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Hula
A A Chumak
A H Berdyshev
O F Mehed'
T M Horid'ko
N L Kindruk
H V Kosiakova
O D Zhukov
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Mar-Apr;81(2):107-16
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Administration, Oral
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Burns - drug therapy - enzymology - immunology - metabolism
Catalase - blood - metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Erythrocytes - drug effects - enzymology - metabolism
Ethanolamines - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Glutathione Reductase - blood - metabolism
Interleukin-6 - blood - immunology
Liver - drug effects - enzymology
Nitric Oxide Synthase - metabolism
Rats
Skin - drug effects - enzymology - injuries - metabolism
Spleen - drug effects - enzymology
Stearic Acids - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Superoxide Dismutase - blood - metabolism
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood - immunology
Wound Healing - drug effects
Abstract
The biochemical mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effect of endocannabinoid congener N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE) was studied on the model of experimental burn in rats. The animals after the thermal burn of the skin received per os during 7 days the water suspension of NSE in a doze 10 mg/kg of body weight. In the other groups of rats the suspension was applied to the wound (the concentration of NSE was 10 mg/ml). It was shown for the first time that NSE accelerated the process of burn wound healing by the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6) production. NSE caused the normalization of the iNOS and cNOS activity and of nitrite content in plasma, erythrocytes, liver and spleen of rats. NSE also modified the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) activity and diminished the level of lipid peroxidation. The discovered anti-inflammatory NSE properties suggest the possibility of its usage for burn treatment.
PubMed ID
19873884 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Aortic valve stenosis: persistence of infective agents or noninfective inflammatory process?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174366
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2004;49(11):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
O V Andropova
E I Polubentseva
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2004;49(11):28-30
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Aortic Valve Stenosis - blood - etiology - pathology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Calcinosis - blood - etiology - pathology
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cytomegalovirus - immunology
Cytomegalovirus Infections - complications
Disease Progression
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Interleukin-8 - blood
Male
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
The probable risk factors leading to aortic valve calcification are not clearly defined. The cross-sectional study of 85 patients with vascular and valvular calcification was performed. Correlations between the immune tests and aortic stenosis severity were investigated. The predictors of aortic valve calcification were probably C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. The predictors of aortic stenosis progression were interleukin-8, antibodies of Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus, and dysregulation of complement's components. Implication of immune reactivity could influence aortic valve calcification.
PubMed ID
15945547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of red blood cell n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with plasma inflammatory biomarkers among the Quebec Cree population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262751
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;68(9):1042-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
M-È Labonté
E. Dewailly
M. Lucas
P. Couture
B. Lamarche
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;68(9):1042-7
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood
Abstract
We examined the prevalence of elevated plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations and associations with red blood cell (RBC) long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) in the James Bay Cree population from the province of Quebec (Canada).
A total of 744 Cree adults (18-91 years) from seven communities of Eastern James Bay were included in these cross-sectional analyses. Associations between RBC LCn-3PUFA and proinflammatory markers (hs-CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a)) were assessed by using multivariate general linear models with adjustment for sex, age and waist circumference. An arbitrary inflammation score was defined based on the sum of the quartiles of hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-a concentrations (range=3-12).
Elevated hs-CRP concentrations (>3?mg/l) were present in 46.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 43.3-50.5) of the James Bay Cree population. RBC docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3; C22:5n-3) was inversely associated with hs-CRP, TNF-a and the inflammation score (all P trend0.18). Among participants with RBC DPAn-3 levels above the median of the population, odds ratio of having an elevated inflammation score (=9) was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.48-0.93) compared with participants below the median.
RESULTS indicate that low-grade systemic inflammation is highly prevalent and that higher RBC DPAn-3 levels are associated with a lower risk of systemic inflammation in the James Bay Cree population.
PubMed ID
25028086 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of epicardial fat with coronary calcification, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibroblast growth factor-23 in stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116874
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jasmine D Kerr
Rachel M Holden
Alexander R Morton
Robert L Nolan
Wilma M Hopman
Cynthia M Pruss
Jocelyn S Garland
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:26
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Biological Markers - analysis
Calcinosis - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Fibroblast Growth Factors - blood
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Pericardium - pathology
Prevalence
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Epicardial fat, quantified in a single multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) slice, is a reliable estimate of total epicardial fat volume (EFV). We sought to determine risk factors for EFV detected in a single-slice MSCT measurement (ssEFV) in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Our primary objective was to determine the association between ssEFV and coronary artery calcification (CAC).
94 pre-dialysis stage 3-5 CKD patients underwent MSCT to measure ssEFV and CAC. ssEFV was quantified at the level of the left main coronary artery. Measures of inflammation, traditional and kidney-related cardiovascular disease risk factors were collected.
Mean age: 63.7 ± 14 years, 56% male, 39% had diabetes, and mean eGFR: 25.1 ± 11.9 mL/min/1.73 m2. Mean ssEFV was 5.03 ± 2.4 cm3. By univariate analysis, body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.53; P =
Notes
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2001 May;280(5):E745-5111287357
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2012 Jan;220(1):223-3022015177
Cites: Metabolism. 2002 Apr;51(4):487-9111912559
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Nov 18;108(20):2460-614581396
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec;26(12):3320-514633821
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Feb 3;140(3):167-7414757614
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004 May;15(5):1307-1515100371
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1990 Mar 15;15(4):827-322407762
Cites: Circulation. 1996 Sep 1;94(5):1175-928790070
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1999 Mar 16;130(6):461-7010075613
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Feb;16(2):507-1315601745
Cites: Nat Clin Pract Cardiovasc Med. 2005 Oct;2(10):536-4316186852
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2005 Oct;25(10):2062-816123319
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Oct 25;112(17):2735-5216157765
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2006 Jul;116(7):1784-9216823476
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Aug 15;145(4):247-5416908915
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2006 Sep;21(9):2464-7116735378
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2006 Sep;48(3):383-9116931211
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Oct;119(10):812-917000207
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2008 Sep;31(9):1898-90418591398
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Oct;52(4):661-7118805347
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Nov;52(5):849-5818562059
Cites: Ren Fail. 2009;31(2):140-319212911
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep;90(3):499-50419571212
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 Mar;25(3):993-720037168
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):590-720167683
Cites: Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2010 Jun;8(3):229-3420156077
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jul;30(7):1340-620395594
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2010 Aug;211(2):601-520363472
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Oct;25(10):2091-720593414
Cites: Hemodial Int. 2010 Oct;14(4):425-3220955275
Cites: Regul Pept. 2010 Dec 10;165(2-3):210-720691218
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011 Jan;31(1):219-2720966399
Cites: Jpn J Radiol. 2011 Feb;29(2):104-921359935
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Aug;6(8):1920-521757644
Cites: Ren Fail. 2011;33(8):770-521770856
Cites: Kidney Int. 2011 Dec;80(11):1231-821866089
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2002 Feb;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-26611904577
PubMed ID
23351146 View in PubMed
Less detail

118 records – page 1 of 12.