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27 records – page 1 of 3.

alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone protects the allograft in experimental heart transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51606
Source
Transplantation. 2002 Dec 27;74(12):1678-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-27-2002
Author
Stefano Gatti
Gualtiero Colombo
Roberto Buffa
Flavia Turcatti
Letizia Garofalo
Nadia Carboni
Luca Ferla
Luigi R Fassati
James M Lipton
Anna Catania
Author Affiliation
Division of Liver Transplantation, Ospedale Maggiore di Milano IRCCS, Milano, Italy.
Source
Transplantation. 2002 Dec 27;74(12):1678-84
Date
Dec-27-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Endothelin-1 - genetics
Gene Expression - drug effects
Graft Rejection - drug therapy - immunology - pathology
Graft Survival - drug effects - immunology
Heart Transplantation
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 - genetics
Interferon Type II - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 - genetics
Nitrates - blood
Nitric Oxide - blood
Nitric Oxide Synthase - genetics
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Nitrites - blood
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis - genetics
RANTES - genetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transforming Growth Factor beta - genetics
Transplantation, Homologous
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - genetics
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 - genetics
alpha-MSH - pharmacology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: With the increasing need for organ transplantation and the use of "marginal" organs, novel approaches are sought to increase the efficiency and survival of transplanted tissue. We tested the idea that treatment with the anti-inflammatory peptide, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), an endogenous hormone that does not cause marked immunosuppression but does reduce reperfusion injury, may protect allografts and prolong their survival. METHODS: Donor cardiac grafts (Brown Norway) were transplanted heterotopically into the abdomen of recipient (Lewis) rats. Treatments consisted of intraperitoneal injections of Nle DPhe -alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) or saline from the time of transplantation until sacrifice or spontaneous rejection. Allografts were removed on day 1, day 4, or at the time of rejection and examined for histopathology and expression of molecules prominent in reperfusion injury, transplant rejection, and apoptosis. RESULTS: NDP-alpha-MSH treatment caused a significant increase in allograft survival and a marked decrease in leukocyte infiltration. Expression of molecules such as endothelin 1, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, which are involved in allograft rejection, was significantly inhibited in NDP-alpha-MSH-treated rats. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that protection of the allograft from early injury with alpha-MSH can postpone rejection. Addition of this early protection with the peptide to usual treatment with immunosuppressive agents may, therefore, improve success of organ transplants.
PubMed ID
12499879 View in PubMed
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Association between interleukin 1 gene cluster polymorphisms and bilateral distal interphalangeal osteoarthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149097
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Sep;36(9):1977-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Svetlana Solovieva
Olli-Pekka Kämäräinen
Ari Hirvonen
Satu Hämäläinen
Mari Laitala
Tapio Vehmas
Katariina Luoma
Annu Näkki
Hilkka Riihimäki
Leena Ala-Kokko
Minna Männikkö
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Author Affiliation
Centre of Expertise Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. Svetlana.Solovieva@ttl.fi
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Sep;36(9):1977-86
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomechanical Phenomena
Dentistry
Female
Finger Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Finland
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multigene Family - genetics
Occupational Diseases - genetics - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Receptors, Interleukin-1 - genetics
Risk factors
Teaching
Weight-Bearing - physiology
Abstract
To examine the association of the interleukin 1 gene (IL1) cluster polymorphisms and their haplotypes with bilateral distal interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis (DIP OA).
Radiographs of both hands of 295 dentists and 248 teachers were examined and classified for the presence of OA using reference images. Bilateral DIP OA was defined by the presence of radiographic findings of grade 2 or more in at least 1 symmetrical pair of the DIP joints. We genotyped 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the IL1R1, IL1RL2, IL1A, IL1B, and IL1RN genes using polymerase chain reaction-based methods. Haplotypes were statistically reconstructed using the PHASE program. The association between the genotypes/diplotypes and bilateral DIP OA was examined with logistic regression analysis.
Two IL1B SNP (rs1143634 and rs1143633) were associated with bilateral DIP OA. The carriers of the IL1B rs1143634 minor allele had an increased OA risk [odds ratio (OR) 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.26] compared to the noncarriers. The association was stronger in the dentists. The distribution of the IL1B rs1143633 genotype fit a recessive mode of inheritance (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.35-6.83, p = 0.006). Two IL1B-IL1RN extended haplotype alleles (211-1 and 121-1) were associated with bilateral DIP OA. An interaction between the IL1B rs1143634 and the IL1R1-IL1RL2 and IL1B-IL1RN extended haplotypes and occupation (increased risk of OA among dentists only) was observed.
Our results provide further evidence for the role of IL1 gene cluster polymorphisms in the etiology of OA and suggest that some of these may predispose DIP joints to the effects of mechanical overload.
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2009 Sep;36(9):1864-519738208
PubMed ID
19684156 View in PubMed
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Association of pesticide exposure, vaccination response, and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153968
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
M. Baranska
L. Van Amelsvoort
S. Birindelli
S. Fustinoni
E. Corsini
J. Liesivuori
H. Van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bulgaria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Immunity - drug effects - immunology
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Interleukin-1alpha - genetics
Interleukin-1beta - genetics
Italy
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Pesticides - poisoning
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk assessment
Vaccination
Abstract
We performed a cross-sectional study involving workers from four European countries in which exposure to pesticides and immune parameters were evaluated over a short period of time. The total study population consisted of 238 workers occupationally exposed to pesticides and 198 nonoccupationally exposed workers. The study showed that pesticide exposure at levels encountered by workers under different conditions in Europe did not affect the ability of the immune system to respond to vaccination. We could, however, identify individuals within the group of pesticide exposed workers who were genetically characterized by the 2.2 IL-1alpha polymorphism and who showed a lower antibody response, pointing out the importance of the understanding of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the identification of high-risk individuals, which may eventually lead to preventive measures.
PubMed ID
19042953 View in PubMed
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Association of the IL1 gene cluster with susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis: an analysis of three Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170470
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Mar;54(3):974-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Walter P Maksymowych
Proton Rahman
Jeff P Reeve
Dafna D Gladman
Lynette Peddle
Robert D Inman
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. walter.maksymowych@ualberta.ca
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Mar;54(3):974-85
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Multigene Family
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
To examine the association between the IL1 gene cluster and susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in 3 independent case-control cohorts.
We analyzed 394 patients and 446 controls from Alberta, Newfoundland, and Toronto, Canada. Samples were genotyped using a panel of 38 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers within the IL1 gene cluster. Data from 20 informative and nonredundant SNP markers were analyzed using several association test strategies. First, we used the program WHAP to identify single-marker associations. Second, we used WHAP to analyze "sliding windows" of 3 contiguous markers along the entire extent of the IL1 gene cluster in order to identify haplotypic associations. Third, we used the linkage disequilibrium mapping program DMLE to estimate the posterior probability distribution of a disease locus.
A total of 14 SNP markers showed significant single-locus disease associations, the most significant being rs3783526 (IL1A) (P = 0.0009 in the Alberta cohort, P = 0.04 in the Newfoundland cohort) and rs1143627 (IL1B) (P = 0.0005 in the Alberta cohort, P = 0.02 in the Newfoundland cohort). Analysis of 3-marker sliding windows revealed significant and consistent associations with all of the haplotypes in the IL1A and IL1B loci in the Alberta cohort and with IL1B in the Newfoundland cohort, especially haplotypes rs1143634/rs1143630/rs3917356 and rs1143630/rs3917356/rs3917354 (P = 0.006-0.0001). With DMLE, a strong peak in the probability distribution was estimated near IL1A in both the Alberta and the Newfoundland populations.
These results indicate that the IL1 locus, or a locus close to IL1, is associated with susceptibility to AS.
PubMed ID
16508980 View in PubMed
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Clinical consequences of IL-1 genotype on early implant failures in patients under periodontal maintenance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62762
Source
Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2005;7(1):51-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Henrik Jansson
Kristina Hamberg
Hugo De Bruyn
Gunilla Bratthall
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Centre for Oral Health Sciences, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. Henrik.Jansson@od.mah.se
Source
Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2005;7(1):51-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans - isolation & purification
Adult
Aged
Dental Implants
Dental Plaque - microbiology
Dental Restoration Failure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Gingival Hemorrhage - immunology - microbiology
Humans
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - rehabilitation - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - immunology - microbiology - prevention & control
Periodontal Index
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Porphyromonas gingivalis - isolation & purification
Prevotella nigrescens - isolation & purification
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Smoking
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Implant failure and biologic complications such as periimplantitis are not completely avoidable. Are there any genetic and microbiologic parameters that could be used to identify patients at risk for implant failure, preferably prior to treatment? This would result in improvement of the diagnostics, treatment decision, and risk assessment. PURPOSE: The aims of this retrospective study were to describe (1) the absolute failure rate of Brånemark System implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) consecutively installed over a 10-year period in partially edentulous patients treated for periodontal disease prior to implant treatment and under regular professional maintenance, (2) the rate of interleukin-1 (IL-1) polymorphism in those patients who experienced at least one implant failure during the first year of function, and (3) the prevalence of periodontal pathogens in dental and periimplant sites with and without signs of inflammation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Of 766 patients, 81 encountered at least one implant failure; 22 patients were clinically examined and were tested genetically for IL-1 genotypes. The presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens was analyzed. RESULTS: The absolute implant survival rate for the whole population was 95.32%; 10.57% of the patients encountered an implant loss. Implant loss in the examined group (n = 22) was 32 of 106 (30.1%); 10 (45%) of the 22 patients were smokers, and 6 (27%) of the 22 patients were IL-1 genotype positive. Patients positive for IL-1 genotype were not more prone to implant loss; however, a significant synergistic effect with smoking was demonstrated. Between patients who were IL-1 genotype positive and those who were IL-1 genotype negative, the differences in regard to bleeding on probing or periodontal pathogens did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: The overall implant failure rate in a population treated and maintained for periodontal disease is similar to that of healthy subjects. A synergistic effect found between smoking and a positive IL-1 genotype resulted in a significantly higher implant loss. This indicates that further research with a larger patient group should focus on multifactorial analysis for adequate risk assessment.
PubMed ID
15903175 View in PubMed
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A common IL-1 complex haplotype is associated with an increased risk of atopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185376
Source
J Med Genet. 2003 May;40(5):e66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003

Cytokine gene expression in cerebral hemispheres and behavioral reactions of (CBAxC57Bl)F1 mice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57452
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2002 Jan;133(1):65-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
A F Poveshchenko
E V Markova
N A Korotkova
E V Yakushenko
V V Abramov
V A Kozlov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Immunology, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk. PoveshchenkoA200@mail.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2002 Jan;133(1):65-7
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Brain - metabolism
Cytokines - genetics - metabolism
Interleukin-1 - genetics - metabolism
Laterality
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Inbred CBA
Peptide Fragments - genetics - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Receptors, Erythropoietin - genetics - metabolism
Receptors, Interleukin - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Interleukin-1beta mRNA, interleukin-1beta receptor mRNA, and erythropoietin receptor mRNA are expressed in the brain of (CBAxC57Bl)F1 mice. Immunization with sheep erythrocytes stimulated the expression of these cytokines in the cerebral hemispheres. Injection of recombinant erythropoietin reduced expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-1beta receptor, and erythropoietin receptor genes in the brain of experimental animals and considerably increased their motor activity in the open field test.
PubMed ID
12170310 View in PubMed
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Epistatic effect of IL1A and IL4RA genes on the risk of atopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181223
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Mar;113(3):445-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Kati Adjers
Tanja Pessi
Jussi Karjalainen
Heini Huhtala
Mikko Hurme
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical School, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Mar;113(3):445-7
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Asthma - genetics - immunology
Base Sequence
Case-Control Studies
DNA - genetics
Epistasis, Genetic
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - genetics - immunology
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Interleukin-4 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
Several studies have demonstrated a linkage or association of the atopic phenotype with T-cell cytokine genes involved in the regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance (eg, IL4, IL13, and their common receptor, IL4RA). We have recently shown that polymorphism of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1A gene is strongly associated with atopy.
We now examined whether the polymorphisms of IL1A (G/T at +4845) and IL4RA (T/C at +22446) would show an epistatic effect on the risk of atopy.
Skin prick tests and gene polymorphism analyses were performed in a population-based sample of asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects.
Our results showed that in the nonasthmatic group the previously described elevated risk of atopy in noncarriers of allele T of IL1A (ie, having the genotype GG) was restricted to individuals who were also noncarriers of allele C of IL4RA (genotype TT). This finding applies to the general population of Finland, where 3.3% of adults are asthmatic.
These data suggest that the IL1A and IL4RA genes show an epistatic effect on the risk of atopy.
PubMed ID
15007345 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.