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Accommodation needs and student-environment fit in upper secondary schools for students with severe physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197755
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Jun;67(3):162-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
H. Hemmingsson
L. Borell
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institution of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy and Elderly Care Research, Stockholm, Sweden. Helena.Hemmingsson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Jun;67(3):162-72
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Needs Assessment
Occupational therapy
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify, from the personal perspective of students with disability, their needs for physical and social accommodations in upper secondary schools specially adapted for students with severe physical disabilities. The study also aimed to identify those areas of student-environment fit which were most often achieved. Forty-eight students in four schools in Sweden were assessed by occupational therapists using the School Setting Interview. Forty-seven students reported needs for accommodations in the school setting. The study indicates that schools generally were able to meet the students' accommodation needs in the physical environment. The schools also met students' accommodation needs for field trips, sport activities and assistance. Student-environment fit in occupations requiring reading, remembering and speaking was unsatisfactory. Accommodations on a general, group and individual level are highlighted and discussed. The study recommends that occupational therapists become more involved and offer society their expertise in barrier removal to a greater extent.
PubMed ID
10914479 View in PubMed
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The aesthetic dimension in hospitals--an investigation into strategic plans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81540
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Caspari Synnøve
Eriksson Katie
Nåden Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Synnove.Caspari@su.hio.no
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environment Design - standards
Esthetics
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Guidelines
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction - standards
Hospitals, General - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Noise - prevention & control
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Plants
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The underlying assumption was that the aesthetics of the hospital surroundings are often neglected. AIMS: This article is the first part of a larger study into the aesthetics of general hospitals. The aim of the study is to throw light on the influence of aesthetics on the health and well-being of patients and the professional personnel, and to examine how aesthetic considerations are dealt with. We present a survey of how the aesthetic dimension is planned and it is considered important in the strategic plans of Norwegian general hospitals. METHODS: Data were sampled by analyzing the strategic plans of somatic hospitals. Sixty-four of 86 hospitals responded (74%). Concepts were categorized in a matrix of 11 main categories, each with subcategories. The method was quantitative, in that the analyzed material was amenable to counting. RESULTS: Very few concrete guidelines or directions for the aesthetic dimension have been included in written documents. This indicates that the aesthetic area is a neglected field in the directions for the daily management of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The research available today on the contribution of environmental aesthetics to health, rehabilitation, and well-being suggests that it is important to have concrete guidelines recorded in strategic plans. This field concerns the maintenance of high quality in the caring professions.
PubMed ID
16824528 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of furniture-related dermatitis: searching for a cause.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148252
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Jan;162(1):108-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
K. Lammintausta
E. Zimerson
T. Hasan
P. Susitaival
S. Winhoven
B. Gruvberger
M. Beck
J D Williams
M. Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Hospital, PO Box 52, 20521 Turku, Finland. kaija.lammintausta@tyks.fi
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Jan;162(1):108-16
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - toxicity
Antifungal Agents - chemistry - toxicity
Chromatography, Thin Layer
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fumarates - chemistry - toxicity
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests - adverse effects
Abstract
Background Sitting in new chairs or sofas has elicited dermatitis in numerous patients in Finland and in the U.K. since autumn 2006. The cause of the dermatitis seemed to be an allergen in the furniture materials. Objectives To determine the cause of the dermatitis in patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Methods Altogether 42 patients with furniture-related dermatitis were studied. First, 14 Finnish patients were patch tested with the standardized series and with the chair textile material. A thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) strip and an extract made from the same textile material were tested in seven Finnish patients. The test positive spot of the TLC and the content of a sachet found inside a sofa in the U.K. were analysed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All chemicals analysed were patch tested in 37 patients. Results A positive patch test reaction to the chair textile and to its extract was seen in all patients tested, one-third of whom had concurrent reactions to acrylates. Positive reactions to the same spot of the TLC strip were seen in five of seven patients and dimethyl fumarate was analysed from the spot as well as from the sachet contents. Dimethyl fumarate (0.01%) elicited positive reactions in all the patients. The other chemicals analysed did not elicit positive reactions, but one patient in the U.K. had a positive reaction to tributyl phosphate. Conclusions Sensitization to dimethyl fumarate was seen in all the patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Concurrent sensitization or cross-reactions were common among the sensitized patients.
PubMed ID
19796182 View in PubMed
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An exploration of environmental variables and patient falls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244453
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jun;58(6):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1981

An outbreak of furniture related dermatitis ('sofa dermatitis') in Finland and the UK: history and clinical cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148253
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Apr;24(4):486-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
P. Susitaival
S M Winhoven
J. Williams
K. Lammintausta
T. Hasan
M H Beck
B. Gruvberger
E. Zimerson
M. Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, North Carelia Central Hospital, Joensuu, Finland. paivikki.susitaival@pkssk.fi
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Apr;24(4):486-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatologic Agents - adverse effects - contraindications
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fumarates - adverse effects - contraindications
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
In February 2007, an epidemic of severe dermatitis from Chinese recliner chairs and sofas started to unfold first in Finland and a few months later in the UK. Some patients reacted in patch tests (PTs) strongly to the material of their furniture, either leather or fabric. There have been hundreds of reports of chair or sofa dermatitis from Finland and the UK, with all cases linked to the same furniture factory in China. Clinical findings in both countries were very similar and unlike any known dermatosis. Many cases have been quite severe, resembling mycosis fungoides or septic infections, requiring hospitalization. Commercial PTs did not reveal the cause but a fungicide was strongly suspected, although such use was denied by the factory. The laboratory of Malm? University Dermatology Clinic has helped in the process by making thin layer chromatograms from sofa or chair materials and test substances of suspected chemicals. Finally, sachets marked with 'mouldproof agent' were found in varying numbers and distribution in the sofas. These contained dimethyl fumarate (DMF) which proved in skin tests to cause strong positive reactions with down to 0.01 dilution. Reports from other countries (Belgium, France, Ireland, Sweden and Spain) have since appeared, and the EU has banned the use of DMF in consumer products.
PubMed ID
19796087 View in PubMed
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Are the desks and chairs at school appropriate?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160977
Source
Ergonomics. 2007 Oct;50(10):1561-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
L. Saarni
C-H Nygård
A. Kaukiainen
A. Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. lea.saarni@uta.fi
Source
Ergonomics. 2007 Oct;50(10):1561-70
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Child
Equipment Design
Female
Finland
Human Engineering
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Male
Posture - physiology
Schools
Students
Video Recording
Abstract
The aim of the current study was to find out how the measures of chairs and desks match with the anthropometrics of schoolchildren and how schoolchildren sit during a lesson in their classroom. This paper reports the baseline measurements of an intervention study. Participants of this study were 6th and 8th grade (12 and 14 year old) schoolchildren from two comprehensive schools in Finland (N = 101, 57 girls and 44 boys). The main outcome measures were the differences between desk height and elbow-floor height, and chair height and popliteal height. Forty-three participants were randomized for sitting posture analysis by video recordings. The study showed that desks were on average 13 cm above elbow-floor height and chairs 2 cm below popliteal height. For 56% of time participants sat with their backs flexed >20 degrees and/or rotated >45 degrees . For 70% of time they sat with their necks flexed >20 degrees or rotated >45 degrees. The results indicate that there is a mismatch between school furniture and the anthropometrics of schoolchildren. Schoolchildren sit in disadvantaged postures for a substantial part of school lessons.
PubMed ID
17917897 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Dec 13;166(51):4698-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-2004
Author
Ib Hessov
Author Affiliation
ib.hessov@privat.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Dec 13;166(51):4698-701
Date
Dec-13-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Environment Design - trends
Health Facility Environment - trends
Hospital Design and Construction - trends
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Paintings
Sculpture
PubMed ID
15669525 View in PubMed
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Asthma, wheezing, and allergies in Russian schoolchildren in relation to new surface materials in the home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180871
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Apr;94(4):560-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Helen Parise
Victor Kislitsin
Natalia I Lebedeva
John D Spengler
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. j.jaakkola@bham.ac.uk
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Apr;94(4):560-2
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Floors and Floorcoverings - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Interior Design and Furnishings - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Paint - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study of 5951 Russian 8-12-year-old schoolchildren, risks of current asthma, wheezing, and allergy were related to recent renovation and the installation of materials with potential chemical emissions. New linoleum flooring, synthetic carpeting, particleboard, wall coverings, and furniture and recent painting were determinants of 1 or several of these 3 health outcomes. These findings warrant further attention to the type of materials used in interior design.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2000 May;90(5):797-910800434
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):589-9410903609
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Apr;94(4):657-6215054021
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1978 Dec;118(6 Pt 2):1-120742764
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):188-929949747
Cites: Med Lav. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):503-108815361
Cites: J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1993;3 Suppl 1:129-429857299
Cites: Allergy. 1998 Nov;53(11):1096-1009860245
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1994;66(4):261-77843837
PubMed ID
15054004 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baycrest Centre for geriatric care. Part II: Community living at Baycrest Terrace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248270
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Sep 23;119(6):625-8, 633
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-1978
Author
D. Woods
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Sep 23;119(6):625-8, 633
Date
Sep-23-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Jews
Male
Ontario
Recreation
PubMed ID
709454 View in PubMed
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123 records – page 1 of 13.