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411 records – page 1 of 42.

Access by air: Mission Air provides vital link.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222916
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Barr
Author Affiliation
Mission Air Transportation Network, Toronto.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft - economics
Canada
Fund Raising - methods
Humans
Industry - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Organizational Objectives
Transportation of Patients - economics - methods
Travel
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Every year thousands of Canadians must travel far from home to receive specialized medical treatment or diagnosis. For many individuals, funds for air travel are limited. The Mission Air Network removes some of this stress by arranging free flights for patients and family members or escorts, using seats donated by commercial, corporate and government sponsors.
PubMed ID
10123350 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Actor or arena: contrasting translations of a law on interorganizational integration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117925
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2012;26(6):778-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Johanna Andersson
Mikael Löfström
Susanna Bihari Axelsson
Runo Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden. johanna.andersson@nhv.se
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2012;26(6):778-93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Financial Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, organizational
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics
Social Work - economics - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish framework law has enabled integration between public agencies in vocational rehabilitation. With the support of this law, coordination associations can be formed to fund and organize joint activities. The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze how the law has been interpreted and translated into local coordination associations and how local institutional logics have developed to guide the organization of these associations.
Data was collected through observations of meetings within two coordination associations and supplemented with documents. The material was analyzed by compilation and examination of data from field notes, whereupon the most important aspects were crystallized and framed with institutional organization theory.
Two different translations of the law were seen in the associations studied: the association as an independent actor, and as an arena for its member organizations. Two subsequent institutional logics have developed, influencing decisions on autonomy, objectives and rationality for initiating and organizing in the two associations and their activities. The institutional logics are circular, further enhancing the different translations creating different forms of integration.
Both forms of integration are legitimate, but the different translations have created integration with different degrees of autonomy in relation to the member organizations. Only a long-term analysis can show whether one form of integration is more functional than the other.
This article is based on an extensive material providing insights into a form of interorganizational integration which has been scarcely researched. The findings show how different translations can influence the integration of welfare services.
PubMed ID
23252326 View in PubMed
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Addressing the non-medical determinants of health: a survey of Canada's health regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165318
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
C James Frankish
Glen E Moulton
Darryl Quantz
Arlene J Carson
Ann L Casebeer
John D Eyles
Ronald Labonte
Brian E Evoy
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Frankish@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):41-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Priorities - organization & administration
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Public Health Administration
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Sociology, Medical
Urban health
Abstract
The Canadian health system is undergoing reform. Over the past decade a prominent trend has been creation of health regions. This structural shift is concurrent with a greater emphasis on population health and the broad determinants of health. In parallel, there is a movement toward more intersectoral collaboration (i.e., collaboration between diverse segments of the health system, and between the health system and other sectors of society). The purpose of this exploratory study is to determine the self-reported level of internal action (within regional health authorities) and intersectoral collaboration around 10 determinants of health by regional health authorities across Canada.
From September 2003 to February 2004, we undertook a survey of regional health authorities in Canadian provinces (N = 69). Using SPSS 12.0, we generated frequencies for the self-reported level of internal and intersectoral action for each determinant. Other analyses were done to compare rural/suburban and urban regions, and to compare Western, Central and Eastern Canada.
Of the 10 determinants of health surveyed, child development and personal health practices were self-reported by the majority of health regions to receive greatest attention, both internally and through intersectoral activities. Culture, gender and employment/working conditions received least attention in most regions.
The exploratory survey results give us the first Canadian snapshot of health regions' activities in relation to the broad range of non-medical determinants of health. They provide a starting data set for baselining future progress, and for beginning deeper analyses of specific areas of action and intersectoral collaboration.
PubMed ID
17278677 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking prevention--primary health care in cooperation with local schools. A controlled intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67536
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Mar;17(1):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
N. Svoen
E. Schei
Author Affiliation
Flora municipality Health Centre, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Mar;17(1):54-8
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health Services
School Health Services
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a secondary school smoking prevention program in a small rural Norwegian municipality. DESIGN: The project applied grade specific intervention strategies to all students grades 6-9 and comprised a total of 32 lessons over a period of 3 years, with high student activity. A non-randomised control group was constituted by all 6th-9th grade students in municipalities of similar characteristics in the same county. Results were recorded in annual class-based surveys. SUBJECTS: The intervention group totalled 187 and the control group 364 students. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of daily and occasional smoking and number of cigarettes smoked, during the intervention period. RESULTS: An 80% lower rate of daily smoking and 50% fewer cigarettes smoked by daily smokers. Lower rates of smoking in 9th grade occurred mostly among girls. CONCLUSION: The project resulted in a lower recruitment of daily smokers up to grade 9, as well as fewer cigarettes smoked by daily smokers. The intervention was more successful among girls than boys.
PubMed ID
10229995 View in PubMed
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Advancing health system integration through supply chain improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170152
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):62-6, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mike Rosser
Author Affiliation
Healthcare Materials Management Services, London, Ontario. mike.rosser@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):62-6, 4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Cost Savings
Hospital Distribution Systems
Hospital Information Systems
Hospital Shared Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Inventories, Hospital
Leadership
Materials Management, Hospital - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Purchasing, Hospital
Safety Management
Abstract
Collaboration is a key element to success in the provision of sustainable and integrated healthcare services. Among the many initiatives undertaken to improve service quality and reduce costs, collaboration among hospitals in Ontario has been difficult to achieve; however, voluntary collaboration is vital to achieving transformation of the magnitude envisioned by system leaders.
PubMed ID
16548436 View in PubMed
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Advancing the population health agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170442
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(4):17-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Alan Davidson
Author Affiliation
UBC-Okanagan, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(4):17-21
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Priorities
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Public Health
Public Health Administration
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Using the case of the B.C. Interior Health Authority, the paper teases out some of the bases for practical success and failure in advancing population health in a regionalized health system.
PubMed ID
16509277 View in PubMed
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[Agreement between the Federation of family physicians of Quebec and the minister of Health and Social Services: impact on mental health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150724
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(1):179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jacques Ricard
Author Affiliation
Direction de l'organisation des services de première ligne intégrée, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(1):179-85
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Mental health
Physicians, Family
Quebec
Social Work, Psychiatric - organization & administration
PubMed ID
19475201 View in PubMed
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[Alternative variant of rendering phthisio-pulmonological services to the population at the inter-regional level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227374
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1991;(9):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A V Karpov
T M Golubeva
A N Karachevtsev
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1991;(9):15-9
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration - trends
Hospitals, District - organization & administration - trends
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Lung Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Pulmonary Medicine - trends
Russia
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - prevention & control - therapy
Urban Population
Abstract
An account is given of the work done by scientists and practical workers in establishing and putting into operation an interregional research and practical complex of phthisio-pulmonology on the basis of three regional antituberculosis services of North-Western region of the Russian Federation (Novgorod, Pskov and Leningrad regions) and Leningrad Research Institute of Phthisio-pulmonology on the basis of economic mechanism of their interrelationships.
PubMed ID
1838440 View in PubMed
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411 records – page 1 of 42.