Skip header and navigation

Refine By

148 records – page 1 of 15.

Acknowledging the past while looking to the future: conceptualizing indigenous child trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117696
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Shanley Swanson Nicolai
Merete Saus
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Intergenerational Relations
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Montana
Norway
Politics
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Work - methods - standards
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - ethnology
Abstract
Trauma affects children from all ethnicities, nationalities and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, indigenous children may experience trauma differently than their majority population peers due to traumatic histories of colonization and marginalization. This article reports on an exploratory qualitative study of how service providers in Western Montana and Northern Norway conceptualize Native American and Sámi children's experiences of trauma today. Findings reveal that participants relate current trauma experiences of indigenous youth to historical and intergenerational traumas.
PubMed ID
24851475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ageing of the nursing workforce: what lies ahead and what we can do.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107930
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2013 Sep;60(3):277-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013

Ageism in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181010
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2004 Mar;19(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Erdman B Palmore
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Aggin adn Human Development, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA. ebp@geri.duke.edu
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2004 Mar;19(1):41-6
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Data Collection
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Prejudice
Prevalence
United States
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of ageism in Canada and the United States, in Canada, the Ageism Survey was published in the CARPnews Report on Ageism, and in the United States, the Survey was administered to a convenience sample and published in the Center Report and Fifty Plus. Most respondents in both countries perceived ageism as frequent, but it was reported more often in Canada than in the United States. If the Ageism Survey is used to measure the prevalence of ageism among various groups and countries, we can develop an "epidemiology of ageism" and begin to reduce ageism.
PubMed ID
15032226 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging and risk: physical and sexual abuse of elders in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148833
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Jul;25(7):1183-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Kari Brozowski
David R Hall
Author Affiliation
Nipissing University, North Bay, Ontario, Canada. karib@nipissingu.ca
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Jul;25(7):1183-99
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Elder Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Young Adult
Abstract
In this article, we review the literature on physical and sexual elder abuse within the context of risk theory and feminist sociology. Employing data from the 1999 General Social Survey, we also examine several variables potentially associated with the risk for physical or sexual abuse of elders. Women, Aboriginal Canadians, and elders who are divorced, living in urban areas with low income have a higher risk of physical or sexual abuse. This supports risk and anxiety as factors. Further testing of elder abuse using this theoretical framework is required.
PubMed ID
19717787 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Indian/Alaskan Native grandparents raising grandchildren: findings from the Census 2000 Supplementary Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5982
Source
Soc Work. 2005 Apr;50(2):131-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Esme Fuller-Thomson
Meredith Minkler
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. esme.fuller.thomson@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Work. 2005 Apr;50(2):131-9
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alaska
Censuses
Child
Child care
Child Rearing - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Family - ethnology
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Welfare - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
This article documents the prevalence and national profile of American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) grandparents who are raising their grandchildren, based on data from the American Community Survey/Census 2000 Supplementary Survey. In 2000 there were estimated to be nearly 53,000 AI/AN grandparent caregivers age 45 and older in the United States. Almost half of the caregiving grandparents had been raising a grandchild for five years or longer. The findings reveal a portrait of grandparents committed to raising their grandchildren despite the fact that many were living in extreme poverty, with ill health, and with limited resources and services. One-third of grandparent caregivers were living below the poverty line, and only one-quarter of these were receiving public assistance. Even when compared with their noncaregiving AI/AN peers, grandparents raising grandchildren were disproportionately female, poor, living with a functional disability, and living in overcrowded conditions. Implications for social work practice are presented and recommendations for policy and research are discussed.
PubMed ID
15853190 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Indian and Alaska Native resilience along the life course and across generations: A literature review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286016
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2016;23(3):134-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Christina E Oré
Nicolette I Teufel-Shone
Tara M Chico-Jarillo
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2016;23(3):134-57
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives - ethnology
Human Development
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Resilience, Psychological
Abstract
Examining American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) resilience using the life course framework could inform public health strategies that support favorable health outcomes, despite adversity (e.g., discrimination, historical loss, comorbidity). A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature published from 1970 to 2015 yielded eight articles on AI/AN life course and resilience. A content analysis identified three themes. AI/AN resilience is 1) an ongoing, dynamic process, 2) evident within linked lives and life transitions, and 3) accessed through cultural knowledge and practice. Resilience research could change the paradigm of AI/AN health research to guide asset-based approaches across the life course.
PubMed ID
27383090 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are we in store for some intergenerational warfare?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207437
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Oct 15;157(8):1123-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1997

Assessing youth/adult partnerships: the Seven Circles (AK) experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9941
Source
J Drug Educ. 2002;32(1):1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Eric L Einspruch
Jonathan J Wunrow
Author Affiliation
RMC Research Corporation, Portland, Oregon, USA. eric_einspruch@rmccorp.com
Source
J Drug Educ. 2002;32(1):1-12
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
Seven Circles is a substance abuse prevention coalition in Southeast Alaska with a two-tiered structure consisting of local partnerships joined together in a regional coalition. Seven Circles incorporates a youth/adult partnership approach to accomplish its activities. This article describes the results of four annual administrations of a partnership member survey designed to assess the development and implementation of youth/adult partnerships in the local projects, assess the value of the partnerships to the participants, and gather feedback about the functioning of the Seven Circles Coalition. The results support the youth/adult partnership model and are also discussed in the context of youth empowerment.
PubMed ID
12096553 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between grandparenthood and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263585
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;118:89-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Solveig Glestad Christiansen
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;118:89-96
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
European Continental Ancestry Group
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Few studies have so far enquired into the relationship between being a grandparent and health and mortality outcomes, and the majority of these have looked exclusively at grandparents who take over parenting responsibility for their grandchildren. This study aims to fill this gap in the knowledge of how family structure is linked to mortality by focusing on whether being a grandparent in itself is associated with mortality. Norwegian parents in the age groups 40-73 are analysed using register data that encompass the entire population. The analysis is based on discrete-time hazard models, estimated for the years 1980-2008. I find a mortality disadvantage of being a grandfather, which is particularly strong for those who become grandfathers at an early age. Controlling for characteristics of the middle generation such as sex, education and marital status does not remove the association. For men the mortality disadvantage is not influenced by the number of grandchildren or the number of sets of grandchildren. For women there is significantly higher mortality only for those who become grandmothers in their thirties or forties, who are married or who have many children. Becoming a grandmother after age 50 is associated with significantly lower mortality. At least part of these associations are likely due to selection effects, however they may also to some extent be caused by the individuals' relationship with grandchildren, and children who have become parents themselves.
PubMed ID
25108695 View in PubMed
Less detail

148 records – page 1 of 15.